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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Modelling and Software, May, 2013, Vol.43, p.160(3)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envsoft.2013.01.008 Byline: Ralf Seppelt (a), Dagmar Bankamp (a), Alexey A. Voinov (b), Andrea Rizzoli (c) Author Affiliation: (a) UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department Computational Landscape Ecology, Leipzig D-04318, Germany (b) International Institute for Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation, University of Twente, The Netherlands (c) Instituto Dalle Molle di Studi sull'Intelligenza Artificiale, USI/SUPSI, Switzerland Article History: Received 19 December 2012; Revised 17 January 2013; Accepted 18 January 2013
    Keywords: Internet Software ; Software Industry ; Software
    ISSN: 1364-8152
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 2
    In: Nature, 2015, Vol.525(7567), p.33
    Keywords: Ecosystem ; Goals ; Spacecraft ; Conservation of Natural Resources -- Statistics & Numerical Data ; Ecology -- Methods ; Environmental Monitoring -- Methods;
    ISSN: 0028-0836
    E-ISSN: 14764687
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Nature, Sept 3, 2015, Vol.525(7567), p.33(1)
    Keywords: Remote Sensing ; Ecosystem Services ; Ecosystems;
    ISSN: 0028-0836
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Applied Ecology, 1 June 2011, Vol.48(3), pp.630-636
    Description: 1. Ecosystem services are defined as the benefits that humans obtain from ecosystems. Employing the ecosystem service concept is intended to support the development of policies and instruments that integrate social, economic and ecological perspectives. In recent years, this concept has become the paradigm of ecosystem management. 2. The prolific use of the term 'ecosystem services' in scientific studies has given rise to concerns about its arbitrary application. A quantitative review of recent literature shows the diversity of approaches and uncovers a lack of consistent methodology. 3. From this analysis, we have derived four facets that characterise the holistic ideal of ecosystem services research: (i) biophysical realism of ecosystem data and models; (ii) consideration of local trade-offs; (iii) recognition of off-site effects; and (iv) comprehensive but critical involvement of stakeholders within assessment studies. 4. These four facets should be taken as a methodological blueprint for further development and discussion. They should critically reveal and elucidate what may often appear to be ad-hoc approaches to ecosystem service assessments. 5. Synthesis and applications: Based on this quantitative review, we provide guidelines for further development and discussions supporting consistency in applications of the ecosystem service concept as well as the credibility of results, which in turn can make it easier to generalise from the numerous individual studies.
    Keywords: Special Profile: The Future of Agri-Environment Schemes
    ISSN: 00218901
    E-ISSN: 13652664
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, November 2018, Vol.33(11), pp.805-809
    Description: Humanity builds upon scientific findings, but the credibility of science might be at risk in a 'postfactual' era of advanced information technologies. Here we propose a systemic change for science, to turn away from a growth paradigm and to refocus on quality, characterized by curiosity, surprise, discovery, and societal relevance.
    Keywords: Environmental Sciences ; Biology ; Ecology
    ISSN: 0169-5347
    E-ISSN: 1872-8383
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 2012, Vol.7(4), p.e35954
    Description: Pollination is a well-studied and at the same time a threatened ecosystem service. A significant part of global crop production depends on or profits from pollination by animals. Using detailed information on global crop yields of 60 pollination dependent or profiting crops, we provide a map of global pollination benefits on a 5′ by 5′ latitude-longitude grid. The current spatial pattern of pollination benefits is only partly correlated with climate variables and the distribution of cropland. The resulting map of pollination benefits identifies hot spots of pollination benefits at sufficient detail to guide political decisions on where to protect pollination services by investing in structural diversity of land use. Additionally, we investigated the vulnerability of the national economies with respect to potential decline of pollination services as the portion of the (agricultural) economy depending on pollination benefits. While the general dependency of the agricultural economy on pollination seems to be stable from 1993 until 2009, we see increases in producer prices for pollination dependent crops, which we interpret as an early warning signal for a conflict between pollination service and other land uses at the global scale. Our spatially explicit analysis of global pollination benefit points to hot spots for the generation of pollination benefits and can serve as a base for further planning of land use, protection sites and agricultural policies for maintaining pollination services.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Agriculture ; Biology ; Earth Sciences ; Social And Behavioral Sciences ; Plant Biology ; Ecology
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, September 2017, Vol.32(9), pp.630-632
    Keywords: Ambiguity of Terms ; Archetypes ; Food Security ; Framework Applicability ; Environmental Sciences ; Biology ; Ecology
    ISSN: 0169-5347
    E-ISSN: 1872-8383
    Source: ScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
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  • 8
    In: PLoS ONE, 2016, Vol.11(3)
    Description: Growing demand of resources increases pressure on ecosystem services (ES) and biodiversity. Monetary valuation of ES is frequently seen as a decision-support tool by providing explicit values for unconsidered, non-market goods and services. Here we present global value transfer functions by using a meta-analytic framework for the synthesis of 194 case studies capturing 839 monetary values of ES. For 12 ES the variance of monetary values could be explained with a subset of 93 study- and site-specific variables by utilizing boosted regression trees. This provides the first global quantification of uncertainties and transferability of monetary valuations. Models explain from 18% (water provision) to 44% (food provision) of variance and provide statistically reliable extrapolations for 70% (water provision) to 91% (food provision) of the terrestrial earth surface. Although the application of different valuation methods is a source of uncertainty, we found evidence that assuming homogeneity of ecosystems is a major error in value transfer function models. Food provision is positively correlated with better life domains and variables indicating positive conditions for human well-being. Water provision and recreation service show that weak ownerships affect valuation of other common goods negatively (e.g. non-privately owned forests). Furthermore, we found support for the shifting baseline hypothesis in valuing climate regulation. Ecological conditions and societal vulnerability determine valuation of extreme event prevention. Valuation of habitat services is negatively correlated with indicators characterizing less favorable areas. Our analysis represents a stepping stone to establish a standardized integration of and reporting on uncertainties for reliable and valid benefit transfer as an important component for decision support.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Research And Analysis Methods ; Ecology And Environmental Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Ecology And Environmental Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Ecology And Environmental Sciences ; Earth Sciences ; Ecology And Environmental Sciences ; Earth Sciences ; Earth Sciences ; Social Sciences
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Management, 2010, Vol.46(6), pp.834-849
    Description: This article analyses the benefits and shortcomings of the recently developed decision support systems (DSS) FLUMAGIS, Elbe-DSS, CatchMODS, and MedAction. The analysis elaborates on the following aspects: (i) application area/decision problem, (ii) stakeholder interaction/users involved, (iii) structure of DSS/model structure, (iv) usage of the DSS, and finally (v) most important shortcomings. On the basis of this analysis, we formulate four criteria that we consider essential for the successful use of DSS in landscape and river basin management. The criteria relate to (i) system quality, (ii) user support and user training, (iii) perceived usefulness and (iv) user satisfaction. We can show that the availability of tools and technologies for DSS in landscape and river basin management is good to excellent. However, our investigations indicate that several problems have to be tackled. First of all, data availability and homogenisation, uncertainty analysis and uncertainty propagation and problems with model integration require further attention. Furthermore, the appropriate and methodological stakeholder interaction and the definition of ‘what end-users really need and want’ have been documented as general shortcomings of all four examples of DSS. Thus, we propose an iterative development process that enables social learning of the different groups involved in the development process, because it is easier to design a DSS for a group of stakeholders who actively participate in an iterative process. We also identify two important lines of further development in DSS: the use of interactive visualization tools and the methodology of optimization to inform scenario elaboration and evaluate trade-offs among environmental measures and management alternatives.
    Keywords: Decision support systems ; Models ; Optimization ; Landscape management ; River basin management ; Environmental policy ; Model integration
    ISSN: 0364-152X
    E-ISSN: 1432-1009
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  • 10
    In: Journal of Applied Ecology, December 2014, Vol.51(6), pp.1690-1700
    Description: Plant diversity is globally threatened by anthropogenic land use including management and modification of the natural environment. At regional and local scales, numerous studies world‐wide have examined land use and its effects on plant diversity, but evidence for declining species diversity is mixed. This is because, first, land use comes in many variations, hampering comparisons of studies. Second, land use directly affects the environment, but indirect effects extend beyond the boundaries of the land in use. Third, land‐use effects greatly depend on the environmental, historical and socio‐economic context. To evaluate the generality and variation of studies’ findings about land‐use effects, we undertook a quantitative synthesis using meta‐analytic techniques. Using 572 effect sizes from 375 studies distributed globally relating to 11 classes of land use, we found that direct and indirect effects of land use on plant diversity (measured as species richness) are variable and can lead to both local decreases and increases. Further, we found evidence (best AIC model) that land‐use‐specific covariables mostly determine effect‐size variation and that in general land‐use effects differ between biomes. Synthesis and applications. This extensive synthesis provides the most comprehensive and quantitative overview to date about the effects of the most widespread and relevant land‐use options on plant diversity and their covariables. We found important covariables of specific land‐use classes but little evidence that land‐use effects can be generally explained by their environmental and socio‐economic context. We also found a strong regional bias in the number of studies (i.e. more studies from Europe and North America) and highlight the need for an overarching and consistent land‐use classification scheme. Thereby, our study provides a new vantage point for future research directions. This extensive synthesis provides the most comprehensive and quantitative overview to date about the effects of the most widespread and relevant land‐use options on plant diversity and their covariables. We found important covariables of specific land‐use classes but little evidence that land‐use effects can be generally explained by their environmental and socio‐economic context. We also found a strong regional bias in the number of studies (i.e. more studies from Europe and North America) and highlight the need for an overarching and consistent land‐use classification scheme. Thereby, our study provides a new vantage point for future research directions. Editor's Choice
    Keywords: Diversity ; Effects ; Land Management ; Land Use ; Meta‐Analysis ; Plants ; Species Richness
    ISSN: 0021-8901
    E-ISSN: 1365-2664
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