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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of music therapy, 2013, Vol.50(3), pp.150-4
    Description: [...]in previous studies where mothers have been asked to sing, Blumenfeld and Eisenfeld (2006), and Carolan, Barry, Gamble, Turner, and Mascareñas (2012) found that, despite after initial interest in the idea of music for their babies, mothers were reluctant to actually sing and withdrew from the studies. [...]the first of my feasibility studies included the investigation of mothers' beliefs, thoughts and spontaneous actions to allow us to understand if building an education protocol around using their voice was acceptable (Shoemark & Arnup, in review). By attending to theory and mechanism for change, the practitioner-researcher can construct a pragmatic series of feasibility studies which will ensure evidence is created at each step and thereby generate capacity and investment for a new generation of music therapy research.
    Keywords: Music ; Periodicals As Topic ; Biomedical Research -- Organization & Administration ; Music Therapy -- Organization & Administration
    ISSN: 0022-2917
    E-ISSN: 20537395
    Source: MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic & Neonatal Nursing, May 2014, Vol.43(3), pp.341-350
    Description: To determine the effect of maternal presence on the physiological and behavioral status of the preterm infant when exposed to recorded music versus ambient sound. Repeated‐measures randomized controlled trial. Special care nursery (SCN) in a tertiary perinatal center. Clinically stable preterm infants (22) born at 〉 28 weeks gestation and enrolled at 〉 32 weeks gestation and their mothers. Infants were exposed to lullaby music (6 minutes of ambient sound alternating with 2x 6 minutes recorded lullaby music) at a volume within the recommended sound level for the SCN. The mothers in the experimental group were present for the first 12 minutes (baseline and first music period) whereas the mothers in the control group were absent overall. There was no discernible infant response to music and therefore no significant impact of maternal presence on infant's response to music over time. However during the mothers’ presence (first 12 minutes), the infants exhibited significantly higher oxygen saturation than during their absence  = .024) and less time spent in quiet sleep after their departure, though this was not significant. Infants may have been unable to detect the music against the ambient soundscape. Regardless of exposure to music, the infants’ physiological and behavioral regulation were affected by the presence and departure of the mothers.
    Keywords: NICU ; Music ; Maternal Presence ; Premature ; Noise ; Sound ; Medicine ; Music ; Nursing
    ISSN: 0884-2175
    E-ISSN: 1552-6909
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Australian Journal of Music Therapy, 2014, Vol.25, p.1(2)
    Keywords: Music Therapy – Methods ; Periodical Publishing – Services
    ISSN: 1036-9457
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Neonatal Nursing, June, 2014, Vol.20(3), p.115(7)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jnn.2013.09.007 Byline: Helen Shoemark, Sarah Arnup Abstract: Short-term family-centered early intervention enhances a mother's capacity for attuned interaction with her hospitalized newborn infant which in turn impacts positively on infant neurodevelopment. This study determined the acceptability of a focus on mothers' own voices to support their hospitalized infant. Sixty mothers of newborn surgical inpatient infants were surveyed about spontaneous vocal behavior in the NICU. Questions included age, education and first experience of parenting, contextualization of voice use relative to other nurturing behaviors, and mother's capacity to imagine or think of a reason for singing to her infant. Sixty percent of mothers sang spontaneously in the NICU. There was strong evidence for an association (p 〈 0.001) between imagining singing or thinking of a reason for singing, and actually singing. There was no evidence for an association between mothers' spontaneous voice use and their age, education or experience of parenting, and musical heritage. Barriers to singing included being too embarrassed or feeling too obvious in the NICU environment. The snapshot of mothers' beliefs, thoughts and action in using their voices is valuable in creating an efficient family empowerment model. Author Affiliation: (a) Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, 50 Flemington Road, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria 3052, Australia (b) The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, Australia (c) Conservatorium, University of Melbourne, Australia
    Keywords: Newborn Infants -- Surveys ; Parenting
    ISSN: 1355-1841
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Australian Journal of Music Therapy, 2018, Vol.29, p.118(2)
    ISSN: 1036-9457
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 6
    In: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, April 2016, Vol.52(4), pp.436-440
    Description: Byline: Helen Shoemark, Edward Harcourt, Sarah J Arnup, Rod W Hunt Keywords: auditory stimulation; Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU); noise; Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU); sound Aim The purpose of this study is to characterise ambient sound levels of paediatric and neonatal intensive care units in an old and new hospital according to current standards. Methods The sound environment was surveyed for 24-h data collection periods (n=80) in the Neonatal and Paediatric Intensive Care Units (NICUs and PICUs) and Special Care Nursery of the old and new Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne. The ambient sound environment was characterised as the proportion of time the ongoing ambient sound met standard benchmarks, the mean 5-s sound levels and the number and duration of noise events. Results In the old hospital, none of the data collection periods in the NICU and PICU met the standard benchmark for ongoing ambient sound, while only 5 of the 22 data collection periods in the new hospital met the recommended level. There was no change in proportion of time at recommended L.sub.eq between the old and the new Special Care Nursery. There was strong evidence for a difference in the mean number of events 〉65dBA (L.sub.max) in the old and new hospital (rate ratio=0.82, 95% confidence interval: 0.73 to 0.92, P=0.001). The NICU and PICU were above 50dBA in 75% of all data collection periods, with ventilatory equipment associated with higher ongoing ambient sound levels. Conclusions The ongoing ambient sound suggests that the background sound environment of the new hospital is not different to the old hospital. However, there may be a reduction in the number of noise events. Article Note: Conflict of interest: None declared.
    Keywords: Auditory Stimulation ; Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nicu ; Noise ; Paediatric Intensive Care Unit Picu ; Sound
    ISSN: 1034-4810
    E-ISSN: 1440-1754
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Chest, 2015, Vol.147(3), p.764(7)
    Keywords: Bardet-Biedl Syndrome – Risk Factors ; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome – Care and Treatment ; Phenotypes – Research ; Signs and Symptoms – Analysis ; Hyperplasia – Risk Factors
    ISSN: 0012-3692
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 22 August 2017, Vol.114(34), pp.9014-9019
    Description: The formation of quasi-spherical cages from protein building blocks is a remarkable self-assembly process in many natural systems, where a small number of elementary building blocks are assembled to build a highly symmetric icosahedral cage. In turn, this has inspired synthetic biologists to design de novo protein cages. We use simple models, on multiple scales, to investigate the self-assembly of a spherical cage, focusing on the regularity of the packing of protein-like objects on the surface. Using building blocks, which are able to pack with icosahedral symmetry, we examine how stable these highly symmetric structures are to perturbations that may arise from the interplay between flexibility of the interacting blocks and entropic effects. We find that, in the presence of those perturbations, icosahedral packing is not the most stable arrangement for a wide range of parameters; rather disordered structures are found to be the most stable. Our results suggest that () many designed, or even natural, protein cages may not be regular in the presence of those perturbations and () optimizing those flexibilities can be a possible design strategy to obtain regular synthetic cages with full control over their surface properties.
    Keywords: Coarse-Grained Modeling ; Icosahedral Symmetry ; Protein Cage ; Protein Design ; Self-Assembly ; Models, Molecular ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Multimerization ; Proteins -- Chemistry
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Thorax, Feb, 2013, Vol.68(2), p.190(2)
    Keywords: Electron Beam Computed Tomography -- Usage ; Cilia -- Analysis ; Mucociliary System -- Physiological Aspects ; Mucociliary System -- Analysis
    ISSN: 0040-6376
    E-ISSN: 14683296
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Australian Journal of Music Therapy, 30 May 2015, Vol.26(No.), p.52-73
    Description: Portable technology has the potential to help support the wellbeing of older adults living in the community, particularly when targeting the health risk factors of social isolation and low self-esteem. This mixed-method feasibility study investigated the acceptability and efficacy of using iPads1 compared to traditional music instruments (TMI) with older adults living privately in the community. Five women, 71 - 96 years old, were recruited from a community-based day respite centre in Brisbane. Participants were randomly assigned to either the TMI or iPad group, and engaged in five sessions of activity-based music therapy. Participants completed journal entries following each session to detail their experiences, and were assessed for levels of perceived social isolation and global self-esteem pre- and post-intervention. Five themes were found for acceptability of iPads: learning was inherent to all sessions, differences in mood outcomes, differences in emotional communications, playing on an iPad resulted in greater creativity and freedom, and the importance of the environmental and structural considerations. There were no significant differences on scores of social isolation or self-esteem either between (TMI vs. iPad) or within (pre- vs. post-test) the treatment groups, however themes of developing social cohesion, group identity, and enhanced positive self-concepts suggest both iPads and TMIs contributed towards factors of wellbeing for the participants. Collectively, the encouraging findings present an entry point in illustrating that technology can be an acceptable and potentially successful tool for use in music therapy with older people living in the community.
    Keywords: Social isolation ; Musical instruments ; Music and technology ; Well-being ; Older people ; iPad (Computer)
    ISSN: 1036-9457
    Source: Informit (RMIT Publishing)
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