Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Language
Year
  • 1
    Article
    Article
    Language: English
    In: Science (New York, N.Y.), 05 December 2003, Vol.302(5651), pp.1681; author reply 1681
    Keywords: Ecosystem ; Carbon Dioxide -- Analysis
    ISSN: 00368075
    E-ISSN: 1095-9203
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: German
    In: best practice onkologie, 2015, Vol.10(2), pp.46-47
    Description: Viele Tumorimpfungen, die derzeit entwickelt werden, sollen das Immunsystem gegen veränderte Proteine der Krebszellen lenken. Jedoch können solche Impfungen nur dann wirken, wenn die Tumorzellen das krebstypisch veränderte Protein passend zurechtgeschnitten dem Immunsystem präsentieren. Wissenschaftler aus dem Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrum und dem Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg beschreiben nun einen Test, mit dem sie diese Grundvoraussetzung für die Wirksamkeit einer Tumorimpfung vorab überprüfen können.
    ISSN: 0946-4565
    E-ISSN: 1862-8559
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Science (New York, N.Y.), 23 September 2016, Vol.353(6306), pp.1393-1398
    Description: Body temperature homeostasis is critical for survival and requires precise regulation by the nervous system. The hypothalamus serves as the principal thermostat that detects and regulates internal temperature. We demonstrate that the ion channel TRPM2 [of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family] is a temperature sensor in a subpopulation of hypothalamic neurons. TRPM2 limits the fever response and may detect increased temperatures to prevent overheating. Furthermore, chemogenetic activation and inhibition of hypothalamic TRPM2-expressing neurons in vivo decreased and increased body temperature, respectively. Such manipulation may allow analysis of the beneficial effects of altered body temperature on diverse disease states. Identification of a functional role for TRP channels in monitoring internal body temperature should promote further analysis of molecular mechanisms governing thermoregulation and foster the genetic dissection of hypothalamic circuits involved with temperature homeostasis.
    Keywords: Hot Temperature ; Body Temperature Regulation -- Physiology ; Fever -- Physiopathology ; Hypothermia -- Physiopathology ; Preoptic Area -- Physiology ; Trpm Cation Channels -- Physiology
    ISSN: 00368075
    E-ISSN: 1095-9203
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Chemosphere, May 2013, Vol.91(7), pp.928-934
    Description: ► Incomplete dissipation of antibiotics increases risks of their accumulation in soil. ► Sulfonamides are leached down to 40 cm depth under routine farm practice. ► Sulfonamide concentrations in leachate exceed 100 ng/L under worst-case conditions. ► Leaching increases in the order: fluoroquinolones 〈 tetracyclines 〈 sulfonamides. ► Sulfonamide leaching is governed by preferential flow. Veterinary antibiotics reach the soil environment by manure application, where they accumulate or are prone to vertical translocation. We assumed that a high pH value at slightly calcareous soil properties should retain tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones even at high manure loads, whereas it should facilitate leaching of sulfonamides. Hence, we investigated the transport of manure-added antibiotics in a soil developed from calcareous parent material on a farm in peri-urban Beijing, China. Leachate was collected from zero-tension samplers, installed at 40 cm depth under undisturbed soil, which was treated according to (i) routine farm practice and (ii) worst-case conditions (high antibiotic concentrations, irrigation imitating heavy rainfall). Additionally, the soil depth distribution of pharmaceuticals at the end of the leaching experiment was analysed. Under routine farm practice, sulfamethazine was repeatedly detected in the leachate with a maximum concentration of 0.12 μg L . All applied substances were still detected in soil after 53 days, suggesting that there was no overall rapid and complete dissipation. Worst-case conditions enhanced vertical translocation; all leachate samples contained sulfonamides (up to 653 μg L sulfamethazine), and even tetracyclines were found in the leachate once, with doxycycline reaching the highest concentration (0.19 μg L ). The concentrated simultaneous occurrence of sulfonamides with the bromide tracer in leachate samples pointed to preferential flow as underlying transport process. The high pH values did not prevent the single leaching event for tetracyclines and hardly affected overall leaching behaviour. The applied fluoroquinolones were not significantly translocated below 4 cm depth, irrespective of irrigation and high manure addition.
    Keywords: Veterinary Antibiotics ; Manure ; Lysimeter ; Preferential Flow ; China ; Chemistry ; Ecology
    ISSN: 0045-6535
    E-ISSN: 1879-1298
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Pollution, Jan, 2013, Vol.172, p.180(6)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2012.09.010 Byline: Tanja Muller (a), Ingrid Rosendahl (b), Andreas Focks (a), Jan Siemens (b), Jorg Klasmeier (a), Michael Matthies (a) Abstract: The long-term environmental fate of the veterinary antibiotic sulfadiazine (SDZ) in soils is determined by a reversible sequestration into a residual fraction and an irreversible formation of non-extractable residues (NER), which can be described as first-order rate processes. However, the concentration dynamics of the resulting fractions of SDZ in soil show an unexplained rapid reduction of extractability during the first 24 h. We therefore investigated the short-term extractability of SDZ in two different soils under different SDZ application procedures over 24 h: with and without manure, for air-dried and for moist soils. In all batches, we observed an instantaneous loss of extractability on a time scale of minutes as well as kinetically determined sequestration and NER formation over 24 h. Data evaluation with a simple kinetic model led to the conclusion that application with manure accelerated the short-term formation of NER, whereas sequestration was very similar for all batches. Author Affiliation: (a) Institute of Environmental Systems Research, University of Osnabruck, Barbarastra[sz]e 12, D-49076 Osnabruck, Germany (b) Institute of Crop Science and Resource Conservation - Soil Science, University of Bonn, Nussallee 13, D-53115 Bonn, Germany Article History: Received 10 June 2012; Revised 19 August 2012; Accepted 8 September 2012
    Keywords: Soils ; Sulfadiazine
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Neuroscience, 01 September 2018, Vol.387, pp.13-27
    Description: The somatosensory system allows us to detect a diverse range of physical and chemical stimuli including noxious ones, which can initiate protective reflexes to prevent tissue damage. However, the sensation of pain can – under pathological circumstances – outlive its usefulness and perpetrate ongoing suffering. Rodent model systems have been tremendously useful to help understand basic mechanisms of pain perception. Unfortunately, the translation of this knowledge into novel therapies has been challenging. We have investigated similarities and differences of human and mouse peptidergic (TRKA expressing) nociceptors using dual-color fluorescence hybridization of dorsal root ganglia. By comparing the transcripts of a selected group of well-established nociceptive markers, we observed significant differences for some of them. We found co-expression of , a key player for sensitization and inflammatory pain, with in a larger population in humans compared to mice. Similar results could be obtained for Na 1.8 and Na 1.9, two voltage gated sodium channels implicated in pathological forms of pain. Additionally, co-expression of and was also found to be more abundant in human neurons. Moreover, the neurofilament heavy polypeptide was detected in all human sensory DRG neurons compared to a more selective expression pattern observed in rodents. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such detailed comparative analysis has been performed and we believe that our findings will direct future experimentation geared to understand the difficulties we face in translating findings from rodent models to humans.
    Keywords: Sensory Neurons ; Dorsal Root Ganglia ; Marker Expression ; Human Nociceptors ; Trp Ion Channels ; Chronic Pain ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0306-4522
    E-ISSN: 1873-7544
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: 2012, Vol.7(9), p.e45397
    Description: Irrigation with wastewater releases pharmaceuticals, pathogenic bacteria, and resistance genes, but little is known about the accumulation of these contaminants in the environment when wastewater is applied for decades. We sampled a chronosequence of soils that were variously irrigated with wastewater from zero up to 100 years in the Mezquital Valley, Mexico, and investigated the accumulation of ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, clarithromycin, carbamazepine, bezafibrate, naproxen, diclofenac, as well as the occurrence of Enterococcus spp., and sul and qnr resistance genes. Total concentrations of ciprofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, and carbamazepine increased with irrigation duration reaching 95% of their upper limit of 1.4 µg/kg (ciprofloxacin), 4.3 µg/kg (sulfamethoxazole), and 5.4 µg/kg (carbamazepine) in soils irrigated for 19–28 years. Accumulation was soil-type-specific, with largest accumulation rates in Leptosols and no time-trend in Vertisols. Acidic pharmaceuticals (diclofenac, naproxen, bezafibrate) were not retained and thus did not accumulate in soils. We did not detect qnrA genes, but qnrS and qnrB genes were found in two of the irrigated soils. Relative concentrations of sul1 genes in irrigated soils were two orders of magnitude larger (3.15×10 −3 ±0.22×10 −3 copies/16S rDNA) than in non-irrigated soils (4.35×10 −5 ±1.00×10 −5 copies/16S rDNA), while those of sul2 exceeded the ones in non-irrigated soils still by a factor of 22 (6.61×10 –4 ±0.59×10 −4 versus 2.99×10 −5 ±0.26×10 −5 copies/16S rDNA). Absolute numbers of sul genes continued to increase with prolonging irrigation together with Enterococcus spp. 23S rDNA and total 16S rDNA contents. Increasing total concentrations of antibiotics in soil are not accompanied by increasing relative abundances of resistance genes. Nevertheless, wastewater irrigation enlarges the absolute concentration of resistance genes in soils due to a long-term increase in total microbial biomass.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Agriculture ; Biology ; Chemistry ; Earth Sciences ; Engineering ; Medicine ; Chemistry ; Microbiology ; Ecology ; Pharmacology
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 12 November 2002, Vol.99(23), pp.14946-51
    Description: Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1) patients suffer from sensorineuronal deafness, vestibular dysfunction, and visual impairment. Several genetic loci have been linked to USH1, and four of the relevant genes have been identified. They encode the unconventional myosin VIIa, the PDZ-domain protein harmonin, and the putative adhesion receptors cadherin 23 (CDH23) and protocadherin 15 (PCDH15). We show here that CDH23 and harmonin form a protein complex. Two PDZ domains in harmonin interact with two complementary binding surfaces in the CDH23 cytoplasmic domain. One of the binding surfaces is disrupted by sequences encoded by an alternatively spliced CDH23 exon that is expressed in the ear, but not the retina. In the ear, CDH23 and harmonin are expressed in the stereocilia of hair cells, and in the retina within the photoreceptor cell layer. Because CDH23-deficient mice have splayed stereocilia, our data suggest that CDH23 and harmonin are part of a transmembrane complex that connects stereocilia into a bundle. Defects in the formation of this complex are predicted to disrupt stereocilia bundles and cause deafness in USH1 patients.
    Keywords: Cadherins -- Genetics ; Carrier Proteins -- Genetics ; Hearing Loss, Sensorineural -- Genetics ; Retinitis Pigmentosa -- Genetics
    ISSN: 0027-8424
    E-ISSN: 10916490
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Pflügers Archiv - European Journal of Physiology, 2018, Vol.470(5), pp.809-822
    Description: Temperature affects all aspects of life down to the diffusion rates of biologically active molecules and reaction rates of enzymes. The reciprocal argument holds true as well and every biological process down to enzymatic reactions influences temperature. In order to assure biological stability, mammalian organisms possess the remarkable ability to maintain internal body temperature within a narrow range, which in humans and mice is close to 37 °C, despite wide environmental temperature variations and different rates of internal heat production. Nevertheless, body temperature is not a static property but adaptively regulated upon physiological demands and in the context of pathological conditions. The brain region that has been primarily associated with internal temperature regulation is the preoptic area and the anterior portion of the hypothalamus. Similar to a thermostat, this brain area detects deep brain temperature, integrates temperature information from peripheral body sensors, and—based on these inputs––controls body temperature homeostasis. Discovered more than a century ago, we still know comparatively little about the molecular and cellular make-up of the hypothalamic thermoregulatory center. After a brief historic outline that led to the discovery of the thermoregulatory center, we here review recent studies that have considerably advanced our understanding of hypothalamic thermoregulation. We touch upon proposed mechanisms of intrinsic deep brain temperature detection and focus on newly identified hypothalamic cell populations that mediate thermoregulatory responses and that provide novel entry points not only to shed light on the mechanistic underpinnings of the thermoregulatory center but also to probe its therapeutic value.
    Keywords: Thermoregulation ; Thermosensation ; Preoptic area ; Hypothalamus ; TRP ion channels ; Temperature homeostasis ; Temperature detection
    ISSN: 0031-6768
    E-ISSN: 1432-2013
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Science of the Total Environment, 2010, Vol.408(20), pp.4910-4915
    Description: Although dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important component of C- and N-fluxes in the environment, its structural composition is still poorly understood due to methodological challenges. We explored the potential of combining pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry (Py-FIMS) and N X-ray absorption near edge structure (N-XANES) spectroscopy to study the molecular–chemical composition of lyophilized bulk soil solution samples that were not subjected to pretreatment like dialysis. Soil leachates were collected at 90 cm and 220 cm depth from an arable and a fallow site. Py-FIMS spectra reflected differences in DOM composition related to land use and sampling depth. Land use effects were expressed in higher abundances of carbohydrates and peptides at the arable than at the fallow site. The relative proportions of carbohydrates decreased and the proportions of lignin-derived compounds increased with depth, indicating a relative enrichment to more stabilized DOM along the flow path. Nitrogen XANES spectra were dominated by the signal of NO -salts but also indicated the presence of organic, non-amidic N as found in imidazoles, pyrazoles, purines and/or nitrile-N, whereas N-compounds like pyridines, pyrroles, quinoline and indole were detected by Py-FIMS. Thus, the combined application of Py-FIMS and N-XANES yielded complementary information regarding the molecular–chemical composition of DOM. Future applications of these techniques may benefit from selectively analyzing soil solution samples with lower nitrate concentrations collected in early spring.
    Keywords: DOM ; Don ; Doc ; Aromatic N ; Lignin ; Nitrate ; Environmental Sciences ; Biology ; Public Health
    ISSN: 0048-9697
    E-ISSN: 1879-1026
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages