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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 07 March 2017, Vol.114(10), pp.2729-2734
    Description: Early after entry into monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, and resting CD4 T cells, HIV encounters a block, limiting reverse transcription (RT) of the incoming viral RNA genome. In this context, dNTP triphosphohydrolase SAM domain and HD domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) has been identified as a restriction factor, lowering the concentration of dNTP substrates to limit RT. The accessory lentiviral protein X (Vpx) proteins from the major simian immunodeficiency virus of rhesus macaque, sooty mangabey, and HIV-2 (SIVsmm/SIVmac/HIV-2) lineage packaged into virions target SAMHD1 for proteasomal degradation, increase intracellular dNTP pools, and facilitate HIV cDNA synthesis. We find that virion-packaged Vpx proteins from a second SIV lineage, SIV of red-capped mangabeys or mandrills (SIVrcm/mnd-2), increased HIV infection in resting CD4 T cells, but not in macrophages, and, unexpectedly, acted in the absence of SAMHD1 degradation, dNTP pool elevation, or changes in SAMHD1 phosphorylation. Vpx rcm/mnd-2 virion incorporation resulted in a dramatic increase of HIV-1 RT intermediates and viral cDNA in infected resting CD4 T cells. These analyses also revealed a barrier limiting HIV-1 infection of resting CD4 T cells at the level of nuclear import. Single amino acid changes in the SAMHD1-degrading Vpx mac239 allowed it to enhance early postentry steps in a Vpx rcm/mnd-2-like fashion. Moreover, Vpx enhanced HIV-1 infection of SAMHD1-deficient resting CD4 T cells of a patient with Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. These results indicate that Vpx, in addition to SAMHD1, overcomes a previously unappreciated restriction for lentiviruses at the level of RT that acts independently of dNTP concentrations and is specific to resting CD4 T cells.
    Keywords: HIV ; Samhd1 ; Vpx ; Resting Cd4 T Cells ; Restriction Factors ; HIV Infections -- Genetics ; Reverse Transcription -- Genetics ; SAM Domain and HD Domain-Containing Protein 1 -- Genetics ; Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 2
    In: Schneider, Constanze and Oellerich, Thomas and Baldauf, Hanna-Mari and Schwarz, Sarah-Marie and Thomas, Dominique and Flick, Robert and Bohnenberger, Hanibal and Kaderali, Lars and Stegmann, Lena and Cremer, Anjali and Martin, Margarethe and Lohmeyer, Julian and Michaelis, Martin and Hornung, Veit and Schliemann, Christoph and Berdel, Wolfgang E and Hartmann, Wolfgang and Wardelmann, Eva and Comoglio, Federico and Hansmann, Martin-Leo and Yakunin, Alexander F and Geisslinger, Gerd and Ströbel, Philipp and Ferreirós, Nerea and Serve, Hubert and Keppler, Oliver T and Cinatl, Jindrich (2016) SAMHD1 is a biomarker for cytarabine response and a therapeutic target in acute myeloid leukemia. Nature medicine, 23 (2). pp. 250-255.
    Description: The nucleoside analog cytarabine (Ara-C) is an essential component of primary and salvage chemotherapy regimens for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). After cellular uptake, Ara-C is converted into its therapeutically active triphosphate metabolite, Ara-CTP, which exerts antileukemic effects, primarily by inhibiting DNA synthesis in proliferating cells. Currently, a substantial fraction of patients with AML fail to respond effectively to Ara-C therapy, and reliable biomarkers for predicting the therapeutic response to Ara-C are lacking. SAMHD1 is a deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) triphosphohydrolase that cleaves physiological dNTPs into deoxyribonucleosides and inorganic triphosphate. Although it has been postulated that SAMHD1 sensitizes cancer cells to nucleoside-analog derivatives through the depletion of competing dNTPs, we show here that SAMHD1 reduces Ara-C cytotoxicity in AML cells. Mechanistically, dGTP-activated SAMHD1 hydrolyzes Ara-CTP, which results in a drastic reduction of Ara-CTP in leukemic cells. Loss of SAMHD1 activity-through genetic depletion, mutational inactivation of its triphosphohydrolase activity or proteasomal degradation using specialized, virus-like particles-potentiates the cytotoxicity of Ara-C in AML cells. In mouse models of retroviral AML transplantation, as well as in retrospective analyses of adult patients with AML, the response to Ara-C-containing therapy was inversely correlated with SAMHD1 expression. These results identify SAMHD1 as a potential biomarker for the stratification of patients with AML who might best respond to Ara-C-based therapy and as a target for treating Ara-C-refractory AML.
    Keywords: RM Therapeutics. Pharmacology
    ISSN: 1078-8956
    Source: University of Kent
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  • 3
    In: Nature Medicine, 2016
    Description: The nucleoside analog cytarabine (Ara-C) is an essential component of primary and salvage chemotherapy regimens for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). After cellular uptake, Ara-C is converted into its therapeutically active triphosphate metabolite, Ara-CTP, which exerts antileukemic effects, primarily by inhibiting DNA synthesis in proliferating cells1. Currently, a substantial fraction of patients with AML fail to respond effectively to Ara-C therapy, and reliable biomarkers for predicting the therapeutic response to Ara-C are lacking2, 3. SAMHD1 is a deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) triphosphohydrolase that cleaves physiological dNTPs into deoxyribonucleosides and inorganic triphosphate4, 5. Although it has been postulated that SAMHD1 sensitizes cancer cells to nucleoside-analog derivatives through the depletion of competing dNTPs6, we show here that SAMHD1 reduces Ara-C cytotoxicity in AML cells. Mechanistically, dGTP-activated SAMHD1 hydrolyzes Ara-CTP, which results in a drastic reduction of Ara-CTP in leukemic cells. Loss of SAMHD1 activity--through genetic depletion, mutational inactivation of its triphosphohydrolase activity or proteasomal degradation using specialized, virus-like particles7, 8--potentiates the cytotoxicity of Ara-C in AML cells. In mouse models of retroviral AML transplantation, as well as in retrospective analyses of adult patients with AML, the response to Ara-C-containing therapy was inversely correlated with SAMHD1 expression. These results identify SAMHD1 as a potential biomarker for the stratification of patients with AML who might best respond to Ara-C-based therapy and as a target for treating Ara-C-refractory AML.
    Keywords: Leukemia ; Chemotherapy ; Biomarkers ; Medical Prognosis ; Cytotoxicity;
    ISSN: 1078-8956
    E-ISSN: 1546-170X
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  • 4
    In: Nature Medicine, 2017, Vol.23(6), p.788
    Description: Corrigendum: SAMHD1 is a biomarker for cytarabine response and a therapeutic target in acute myeloid leukemia
    Keywords: Medicine ; Biology;
    ISSN: 1078-8956
    E-ISSN: 1546-170X
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Journal of virological methods, 05 November 2019, pp.113768
    Description: •Efficient chemical and thermal inactivation of lentiviruses...
    Keywords: Alcohol ; Aldehydes ; Detergents ; Dry-Heat ; Inactivation ; Lentiviruses ; Pseudotyping
    ISSN: 01660934
    E-ISSN: 1879-0984
    Source: MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Zurnic, I., S. Hütter, U. Lehmann, N. Stanke, J. Reh, T. Kern, F. Lindel, et al. 2016. “Proceedings of the Frontiers of Retrovirology Conference 2016.” Retrovirology 13 (Suppl 1): 68. doi:10.1186/s12977-016-0294-5. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12977-016-0294-5.
    Description: Table of contents Oral presentations Session 1: Entry & uncoating O1 Host cell polo-like kinases (PLKs) promote early prototype foamy virus (PFV) replication Irena Zurnic, Sylvia Hütter, Ute Lehmann, Nicole Stanke, Juliane Reh, Tobias Kern, Fabian Lindel, Gesche Gerresheim, Martin Hamann, Erik Müllers, Paul Lesbats, Peter Cherepanov, Erik Serrao, Alan Engelman, Dirk Lindemann O2 A novel entry/uncoating assay reveals the presence of at least two species of viral capsids during synchronized HIV-1 infection Claire Da Silva Santos, Kevin Tartour, Andrea Cimarelli O3 Dynamics of nuclear envelope association and nuclear import of HIV-1 complexes Rya Burdick, Jianbo Chen, Jaya Sastri, Wei-Shau Hu, Vinay Pathak O4 Human papillomavirus protein E4 potently enhances the susceptibility to HIV infection Oliver T. Keppler Session 2: Reverse transcription & integration O5 Structure and function of HIV-1 integrase post translational modifications Karine Pradeau, Sylvia Eiler, Nicolas Levy, Sarah Lennon, Sarah Cianferani, Stéphane Emiliani, Marc Ruff O6 Regulation of retroviral integration by RNA polymerase II associated factors and chromatin structure Vincent Parissi Session 3: Transcription and latency O7 A novel single-cell analysis pipeline to identify specific biomarkers of HIV permissiveness Sylvie Rato, Antonio Rausell, Miguel Munoz, Amalio Telenti, Angela Ciuffi O8 A capsid-dependent integration program linking T cell activation to HIV-1 gene expression Alexander Zhyvoloup, Anat Melamed, Ian Anderson, Delphine Planas, Janos Kriston-Vizi, Robin Ketteler, Chen-Hsuin Lee, Andy Merritt, Petronela Ancuta, Charles Bangham, Ariberto Fassati O9 Characterisation of new RNA polymerase III and RNA polymerase II transcriptional promoters in the Bovine Leukemia Virus genome Anthony Rodari, Benoit Van Driessche, Mathilde Galais, Nadége Delacourt, Sylvain Fauquenoy, Caroline Vanhulle, Anna Kula, Arsène Burny, Olivier Rohr, Carine Van Lint O10 Tissue-specific dendritic cells differentially modulate latent HIV-1 reservoirs Thijs van Montfort, Renee van der Sluis, Dave Speijer, Ben Berkhout Session 4: RNA trafficking & packaging O11 A novel cis-acting element affecting HIV replication Bo Meng, Andrzej Rutkowski, Neil Berry, Lars Dölken, Andrew Lever O12 Tolerance of HIV’s late gene expression towards stepwise codon adaptation Thomas Schuster, Benedikt Asbach, Ralf Wagner Session 5: Assembly & release O13 Importance of the tax-inducible actin-bundling protein fascin for transmission of human T cell leukemia virus Type 1 (HTLV-1) Christine Gross, Veit Wiesmann, Martina Kalmer, Thomas Wittenberg, Jan Gettemans, Andrea K. Thoma-Kress O14 Lentiviral nef proteins antagonize TIM-mediated inhibition of viral release Minghua Li, Eric O. Freed, Shan-Lu Liu Session 6: Pathogenesis & evolution O15 SEVI and semen prolong the half-life of HIV-1 Janis Müller, Jan Münch O16 CD169+ macrophages mediate retrovirus trans-infection of permissive lymphocytes to establish infection in vivo Xaver Sewald, Pradeep Uchil, Mark Ladinsky, Jagadish Beloor, Ruoxi Pi, Christin Herrmann, Nasim Motamedi, Thomas Murooka, Michael Brehm, Dale Greiner, Thorsten Mempel, Pamela Bjorkman, Priti Kumar, Walther Mothes O17 Efficient replication of a vpu containing SIVagm construct in African Green Monkeys requires an HIV-1 nef gene Simone Joas, Erica Parrish, Clement Wesley Gnanadurai, Edina Lump, Christina M. Stürzel, Nicholas F. Parrish, Ulrike Sauermann, Katharina Töpfer, Tina Schultheiss, Steven Bosinger, Guido Silvestri, Cristian Apetrei, Nicholas Huot, Michaela Müller-Trutwin, Daniel Sauter, Beatrice H. Hahn, Christiane Stahl-Hennig, Frank Kirchhoff O18 Reprogramming initiates mobilization of endogenous mutagenic LINE-1, Alu and SVA retrotransposons in human induced pluripotent stem cells with consequences for host gene expression Gerald Schumann, Sabine Jung-Klawitter, Nina V. Fuchs, Kyle R. Upton, Martin Muñoz-Lopez, Ruchi Shukla, Jichang Wang, Marta Garcia-Canadas, Cesar Lopez-Ruiz, Daniel J. Gerhardt, Attila Sebe, Ivana Grabundzija, Patricia Gerdes, Sylvia Merkert, Andres Pulgarin, Anja Bock, Ulrike Held, Anett Witthuhn, Alexandra Haase, Ernst J. Wolvetang, Ulrich Martin, Zoltán Ivics, Zsuzsanna Izsvák, J. Garcia-Perez, Geoffrey J. Faulkner O19 NF-κB activation induces expression of human endogenous retrovirus and particle production Tara Hurst, Aris Katzourakis, Gkikas Magiorkinis Session 7a and b: Innate sensing & intrinsic immunity O20 Identification of the phosphatase acting on T592 in SAMHD1 during M/G1 transition Kerstin Schott, Rita Derua, Janna Seifried, Andreas Reuter, Heike Schmitz, Christiane Tondera, Alberto Brandariz-Nuñez, Felipe Diaz-Griffero, Veerle Janssens, Renate König O21 Vpx overcomes a SAMHD1-independent block to HIV reverse transcription that is specific to resting CD4 T cells Hanna-Mari Baldauf, Lena Stegmann, Sarah-Marie Schwarz, Maud Trotard, Margarethe Martin, Gina Lenzi, Manja Burggraf, Xiaoyu Pan, Oliver I. Fregoso, Efrem S. Lim, Libin Abraham, Elina Erikson, Laura Nguyen, Ina Ambiel, Frank Rutsch, Renate König, Baek Kim, Michael Emerman, Oliver T. Fackler, Oliver T. Keppler O22 The role of SAMHD1 in antiviral restriction and immune sensing in the mouse Sabine Wittmann, Rayk Behrendt, Bianca Volkmann, Kristin Eissmann, Thomas Gramberg O23 T cells expressing reduced restriction factors are preferentially infected in therapy naïve HIV-1 patients Sebastian Bolduan, Herwig Koppensteiner, Stefanie Regensburg, Ruth Brack-Werner, Rika Draenert, Michael Schindler O24 cGAS-mediated innate immunity spreads through HIV-1 env-induced membrane fusion sites from infected to uninfected primary HIV-1 target cells Aurélie Ducroux, Shuting Xu, Aparna Ponnurangam, Sergej Franz, Angelina Malassa, Ellen Ewald, Christine Goffinet O25 Perturbation of innate RNA and DNA sensing by human T cell leukemia virus type 1 oncoproteins Sin-Yee Fung, Ching-Ping Chan, Chun-Kit Yuen, Kin-Hang Kok, Chin-Ping Chan, Dong-Yan Jin O26 Induction and anti-viral activity of Interferon α subtypes in HIV-1 infection Ulf Dittmer O27 Vpu-mediated counteraction of tetherin is a major determinant of HIV-1 interferon resistance Dorota Kmiec, Shilpa Iyer, Christina Stürzel, Daniel Sauter, Beatrice Hahn, Frank Kirchhoff O28 DNA repair protein Rad18 restricts HIV-1 and LINE-1 life cycle Yasuo Ariumi, Mariko Yasuda-Inoue, Koudai Kawano, Satoshi Tateishi, Priscilla Turelli O29 Natural mutations in IFITM3 allow escape from post-translational regulation and toggle antiviral specificity Alex Compton, Nicolas Roy, Françoise Porrot, Anne Billet, Nicoletta Casartelli, Jacob Yount, Chen Liang, Oliver Schwartz Session 8: Adaptive immunity & immune evasion O30 Observing evolution in HIV-1 infection: phylogenetics and mutant selection windows to infer the influence of the autologous antibody response on the viral quasispecies Carsten Magnus, Lucia Reh, Penny Moore, Therese Uhr, Jacqueline Weber, Lynn Morris, Alexandra Trkola O31 Dose and subtype specific analyses of the anti-HIV effects of IFN-alpha family members Rashel V. Grindberg, Erika Schlaepfer, Gideon Schreiber, Viviana Simon, Roberto F. Speck Session 9: Novel antiviral strategies O32 LEDGIN-mediated inhibition of the integrase-LEDGF/p75 interaction reduces reactivation of residual latent HIV Zeger Debyser, Lenard Vranckx, Jonas Demeulemeester, Suha Saleh, Eric Verdin, Anna Cereseto, Frauke Christ, Rik Gijsbers O33 NKG2D-mediated clearance of reactivated viral reservoirs by natural killer cells O34 Inhibition of HIV reactivation in brain cells by AAV-mediated delivery of CRISPR/Cas9 O35 CRISPR-Cas9 as antiviral: potent HIV-1 inhibition, but rapid virus escape and the subsequent design of escape-proof antiviral strategies Ben Berkhout, Gang Wang, Na Zhao, Atze T. Das Session 10: Recent advances in HIV vaccine development O36 Priming with a potent HIV-1 DNA vaccine frames the quality of T cell and antibody responses prior to a poxvirus and protein boost Benedikt Asbach, Josef Köstler, Beatriz Perdiguero, Mariano Esteban, Bertram L. Jacobs, David C. Montefiori, Celia C. LaBranche, Nicole L. Yates, Georgia D. Tomaras, Guido Ferrari, Kathryn E. Foulds, Mario Roederer, Gary Landucci, Donald N. Forthal, Michael S. Seaman, Natalie Hawkins, Steven G. Self, Sanjay Phogat, James Tartaglia, Susan W. Barnett, Brian Burke, Anthony D. Cristillo, Song Ding, Jonathan L. Heeney, Giuseppe Pantaleo, Ralf Wagner O37 Passive immunisation with a neutralising antibody against HIV-1 Env prevents infection of the first cells in a mucosal challenge rhesus monkey model Christiane Stahl-Hennig, Viktoria Stab, Armin Ensser, Ulrike Sauermann, Bettina Tippler, Dennis Burton, Matthias Tenbusch, Klaus Überla O38 HIV antibody Fc-glycoforms drive B cell affinity maturation Galit Alter, Giuseppe Lofano, Anne-Sophie Dugast, Viraj Kulkarni, Todd Suscovich Poster presentations Topic 1: Entry & uncoating P1 Dynein light chain is required for murine leukemia virus infection Tatiana Opazo, Felipe Barraza, Diego Herrera, Andrea Garces, Tomas Schwenke, Diego Tapia, Jorge Cancino, Gloria Arriagada P2 Peptide paratope mimics of the broadly neutralising HIV-1 antibody b12 Christina Haußner, Dominik Damm, Anette Rohrhofer, Barbara Schmidt, Jutta Eichler P3 Investigating cellular pathways involved in the transmission of HIV-1 between dendritic cells and T cells using RNAi screening techniques Rebecca Midgley, James Wheeldon, Vincent Piguet P4 Co-receptor tropism in HIV-1, HIV-2 monotypic and dual infections Priyanka Khopkar, Megha Rohamare, Smita Kulkarni P5 Characterisation of the role of CIB1 and CIB2 as HIV-1 helper factors Ana Godinho-Santos, Allan Hance, Joao Goncalves, Fabrizio Mammano P6 Buffering deleterious polymorphisms in the highly constrained C2 region of HIV-1 envelope by the flexible V3 domain Romain Gasser, Meriem Hamoudi, Martina Pellicciotta, Zhicheng Zhou, Clara Visdeloup, Philippe Colin, Martine Braibant, Bernard Lagane, Matteo Negroni P7 Entry inhibition of HERV-K(HML-2) ...
    Keywords: Meeting Abstracts;
    ISSN: 17424690
    E-ISSN: 17424690
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  • 7
    In: Nature Chemical Biology, 2015, Vol.11(9), p.625
    Description: A wide variety of enzymatic pathways that produce specialized metabolites in bacteria, fungi and plants are known to be encoded in biosynthetic gene clusters. Information about these clusters, pathways and metabolites is currently dispersed throughout the literature, making it difficult to exploit. To facilitate consistent and systematic deposition and retrieval of data on biosynthetic gene clusters, we propose the Minimum Information about a Biosynthetic Gene cluster (MIBiG) data standard.
    Keywords: Chemistry ; Anatomy & Physiology;
    ISSN: 1552-4450
    E-ISSN: 15524469
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Quick submit: 2017-05-10T21:34:45-0400
    Description: A wide variety of enzymatic pathways that produce specialized metabolites in bacteria, fungi and plants are known to be encoded in biosynthetic gene clusters. Information about these clusters, pathways and metabolites is currently dispersed throughout the literature, making it difficult to exploit. To facilitate consistent and systematic deposition and retrieval of data on biosynthetic gene clusters, we propose the Minimum Information about a Biosynthetic Gene cluster (MIBiG) data standard.
    Keywords: Biosynthesis ; Natural Products ; Sequence Annotation ; Synthetic Biology
    ISSN: Medema, Marnix H, Renzo Kottmann, Pelin Yilmaz, Matthew Cummings, John B Biggins, Kai Blin, Irene de Bruijn, et al. 2015. “Minimum Information About a Biosynthetic Gene Cluster.” Nature Chemical Biology 11 (9) (August 18): 625–631. doi:10.1038/nchembio.1890.
    ISSN: 1552-4450
    Source: Harvard University Library
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  • 9
    Language: English
    Description: An important competence of medical doctors is the communication with patients, especially in breaking bad news (BBN) situations. Worked-out examples have been successfully applied to support acquisition of skills. Video-based worked-out examples have been found beneficial especially when no predetermined[for full text, please go to the a.m. URL]...
    Keywords: Medical Sciences; Medicine
    Source: DataCite
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: NATURE CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, 2015
    Keywords: Biology And Life Sciences ; Database ; Natural-Products ; Discovery ; Scale ; Resource
    ISSN: 1552-4450
    Source: Ghent University
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