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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Clinical Bioinformatics, July 28, 2011, Vol.1, p.20
    Description: Background The rapidly growing amount of array CGH data requires improved visualization software supporting the process of identifying candidate cancer genes. Optimally, such software should work across multiple microarray platforms, should be able to cope with data from different sources and should be easy to operate. Results We have developed a web-based software FISH Oracle to visualize data from multiple array CGH experiments in a genomic context. Its fast visualization engine and advanced web and database technology supports highly interactive use. FISH Oracle comes with a convenient data import mechanism, powerful search options for genomic elements (e.g. gene names or karyobands), quick navigation and zooming into interesting regions, and mechanisms to export the visualization into different high quality formats. These features make the software especially suitable for the needs of life scientists. Conclusions FISH Oracle offers a fast and easy to use visualization tool for array CGH and SNP array data. It allows for the identification of genomic regions representing minimal common changes based on data from one or more experiments. FISH Oracle will be instrumental to identify candidate onco and tumor suppressor genes based on the frequency and genomic position of DNA copy number changes. The FISH Oracle application and an installed demo web server are available at http://www.zbh.uni-hamburg.de/fishoracle.
    Keywords: Internet Server Software -- Usage ; Cancer Genetics -- Analysis ; Dna Microarrays -- Usage
    ISSN: 2043-9113
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Clinical Bioinformatics, July 28, 2011, Vol.1, p.20
    Description: Background The rapidly growing amount of array CGH data requires improved visualization software supporting the process of identifying candidate cancer genes. Optimally, such software should work across multiple microarray platforms, should be able to cope with data from different sources and should be easy to operate. Results We have developed a web-based software FISH Oracle to visualize data from multiple array CGH experiments in a genomic context. Its fast visualization engine and advanced web and database technology supports highly interactive use. FISH Oracle comes with a convenient data import mechanism, powerful search options for genomic elements (e.g. gene names or karyobands), quick navigation and zooming into interesting regions, and mechanisms to export the visualization into different high quality formats. These features make the software especially suitable for the needs of life scientists. Conclusions FISH Oracle offers a fast and easy to use visualization tool for array CGH and SNP array data. It allows for the identification of genomic regions representing minimal common changes based on data from one or more experiments. FISH Oracle will be instrumental to identify candidate onco and tumor suppressor genes based on the frequency and genomic position of DNA copy number changes. The FISH Oracle application and an installed demo web server are available at http://www.zbh.uni-hamburg.de/fishoracle.
    Keywords: Internet Server Software -- Usage ; Cancer Genetics -- Analysis ; Dna Microarrays -- Usage
    ISSN: 2043-9113
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Nature, November 2018, Vol.563(7729), pp.121-125
    Description: Many evolutionarily distant pathogenic organisms have evolved similar survival strategies to evade the immune responses of their hosts. These include antigenic variation, through which an infecting organism prevents clearance by periodically altering the identity of proteins that are visible to the immune system of the host. Antigenic variation requires large reservoirs of immunologically diverse antigen genes, which are often generated through homologous recombination, as well as mechanisms to ensure the expression of one or very few antigens at any given time. Both homologous recombination and gene expression are affected by three-dimensional genome architecture and local DNA accessibility. Factors that link three-dimensional genome architecture, local chromatin conformation and antigenic variation have, to our knowledge, not yet been identified in any organism. One of the major obstacles to studying the role of genome architecture in antigenic variation has been the highly repetitive nature and heterozygosity of antigen-gene arrays, which has precluded complete genome assembly in many pathogens. Here we report the de novo haplotype-specific assembly and scaffolding of the long antigen-gene arrays of the model protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, using long-read sequencing technology and conserved features of chromosome folding. Genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) reveals a distinct partitioning of the genome, with antigen-encoding subtelomeric regions that are folded into distinct, highly compact compartments. In addition, we performed a range of analyses-Hi-C, fluorescence in situ hybridization, assays for transposase-accessible chromatin using sequencing and single-cell RNA sequencing-that showed that deletion of the histone variants H3.V and H4.V increases antigen-gene clustering, DNA accessibility across sites of antigen expression and switching of the expressed antigen isoform, via homologous recombination. Our analyses identify histone variants as a molecular link between global genome architecture, local chromatin conformation and antigenic variation.
    Keywords: Antigenic Variation -- Genetics ; Chromatin -- Genetics ; DNA, Protozoan -- Metabolism ; Genome -- Genetics ; Trypanosoma Brucei Brucei -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00280836
    E-ISSN: 1476-4687
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Nucleic acids research, 08 July 2016, Vol.44(W1), pp.W29-34
    Description: Currently available sequencing technologies enable quick and economical sequencing of many new eukaryotic parasite (apicomplexan or kinetoplastid) species or strains. Compared to SNP calling approaches, de novo assembly of these genomes enables researchers to additionally determine insertion, deletion and recombination events as well as to detect complex sequence diversity, such as that seen in variable multigene families. However, there currently are no automated eukaryotic annotation pipelines offering the required range of results to facilitate such analyses. A suitable pipeline needs to perform evidence-supported gene finding as well as functional annotation and pseudogene detection up to the generation of output ready to be submitted to a public database. Moreover, no current tool includes quick yet informative comparative analyses and a first pass visualization of both annotation and analysis results. To overcome those needs we have developed the Companion web server (http://companion.sanger.ac.uk) providing parasite genome annotation as a service using a reference-based approach. We demonstrate the use and performance of Companion by annotating two Leishmania and Plasmodium genomes as typical parasite cases and evaluate the results compared to manually annotated references.
    Keywords: Genome, Protozoan ; Software ; Leishmania -- Genetics ; Plasmodium Falciparum -- Genetics ; Protozoan Proteins -- Genetics ; RNA, Protozoan -- Genetics
    E-ISSN: 1362-4962
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: IEEE/ACM Transactions on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics (TCBB), 01 March 2012, Vol.9(2), pp.345-357
    Description: Today's genome analysis applications require sequence representations allowing for fast access to their contents while also being memory-efficient enough to facilitate analyses of large-scale data. While a wide variety of sequence representations exist, lack of a generic implementation of efficient sequence storage has led to a plethora of poorly reusable or programming language-specific implementations. We present a novel, space-efficient data structure (GtEncseq) for storing multiple biological sequences of variable alphabet size, with customizable character transformations, wildcard support, and an assortment of internal representations optimized for different distributions of wildcards and sequence lengths. For the human genome (3.1 gigabases, including 237 million wildcard characters) our representation requires only 2 + 8\cdot 10^{-6} bits per character. Implemented in C, our portable software implementation provides a variety of methods for random and sequential access to characters and substrings (including different reading directions) using an object-oriented interface. In addition, it includes access to metadata like sequence descriptions or character distributions. The library is extensible to be used from various scripting languages. GtEncseq is much more versatile than previous solutions, adding features that were previously unavailable. Benchmarks show that it is competitive with respect to space and time requirements.
    Keywords: Data Storage Representations, Biology and Genetics, Software Engineering, Reusable Libraries ; Biology
    ISSN: 1545-5963
    E-ISSN: 1557-9964
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Journal of clinical bioinformatics, 28 July 2011, Vol.1(1), pp.20
    Description: The rapidly growing amount of array CGH data requires improved visualization software supporting the process of identifying candidate cancer genes. Optimally, such software should work across multiple microarray platforms, should be able to cope with data from different sources and should be easy to operate. We have developed a web-based software FISH Oracle to visualize data from multiple array CGH experiments in a genomic context. Its fast visualization engine and advanced web and database technology supports highly interactive use. FISH Oracle comes with a convenient data import mechanism, powerful search options for genomic elements (e.g. gene names or karyobands), quick navigation and zooming into interesting regions, and mechanisms to export the visualization into different high quality formats. These features make the software especially suitable for the needs of life scientists. FISH Oracle offers a fast and easy to use visualization tool for array CGH and SNP array data. It allows for the identification of genomic regions representing minimal common changes based on data from one or more experiments. FISH Oracle will be instrumental to identify candidate onco and tumor suppressor genes based on the frequency and genomic position of DNA copy number changes. The FISH Oracle application and an installed demo web server are available at http://www.zbh.uni-hamburg.de/fishoracle.
    Keywords: Biology;
    E-ISSN: 2043-9113
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Mobile DNA, 01 November 2012, Vol.3(1), p.18
    Description: Abstract Background Long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are a class of eukaryotic mobile elements characterized by a distinctive sequence similarity-based structure. Hence they are well suited for computational identification. Current software allows for a comprehensive genome-wide de novo detection of such elements. The obvious next step is the classification of newly detected candidates resulting in (super-)families. Such a de novo classification approach based on sequence-based clustering of transposon features has been proposed before, resulting in a preliminary assignment of candidates to families as a basis for subsequent manual refinement. However, such a classification workflow is typically split across a heterogeneous set of glue scripts and generic software (for example, spreadsheets), making it tedious for a human expert to inspect, curate and export the putative families produced by the workflow. Results We have developed LTRsift, an interactive graphical software tool for semi-automatic postprocessing of de novo predicted LTR retrotransposon annotations. Its user-friendly interface offers customizable filtering and classification functionality, displaying the putative candidate groups, their members and their internal structure in a hierarchical fashion. To ease manual work, it also supports graphical user interface-driven reassignment, splitting and further annotation of candidates. Export of grouped candidate sets in standard formats is possible. In two case studies, we demonstrate how LTRsift can be employed in the context of a genome-wide LTR retrotransposon survey effort. Conclusions LTRsift is a useful and convenient tool for semi-automated classification of newly detected LTR retrotransposons based on their internal features. Its efficient implementation allows for convenient and seamless filtering and classification in an integrated environment. Developed for life scientists, it is helpful in postprocessing and refining the output of software for predicting LTR retrotransposons up to the stage of preparing full-length reference sequence libraries. The LTRsift software is freely available at http://www.zbh.uni-hamburg.de/LTRsift under an open-source license.
    Keywords: Software ; Erv ; Ltr Retrotransposons ; Classification ; Postprocessing ; Prediction ; Annotation ; User Interface ; Biology
    ISSN: 1759-8753
    E-ISSN: 1759-8753
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: IEEE/ACM Transactions on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, May 2013, Vol.10(3), pp.645-656
    Description: Genome annotations are often published as plain text files describing genomic features and their subcomponents by an implicit annotation graph. In this paper, we present the GenomeTools, a convenient and efficient software library and associated software tools for developing bioinformatics software intended to create, process or convert annotation graphs. The GenomeTools strictly follow the annotation graph approach, offering a unified graph-based representation. This gives the developer intuitive and immediate access to genomic features and tools for their manipulation. To process large annotation sets with low memory overhead, we have designed and implemented an efficient pull-based approach for sequential processing of annotations. This allows to handle even the largest annotation sets, such as a complete catalogue of human variations. Our object-oriented C-based software library enables a developer to conveniently implement their own functionality on annotation graphs and to integrate it into larger workflows, simultaneously accessing compressed sequence data if required. The careful C implementation of the GenomeTools does not only ensure a light-weight memory footprint while allowing full sequential as well as random access to the annotation graph, but also facilitates the creation of bindings to a variety of script programming languages (like Python and Ruby) sharing the same interface.
    Keywords: Bioinformatics ; Genomics ; Software ; Computer Languages ; Ontologies ; Software Libraries ; Scientific Computing ; Biology and Genetics ; Software Engineering ; Reusable Libraries ; Programming Environments ; Biology
    ISSN: 1545-5963
    E-ISSN: 1557-9964
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  • 9
    In: Scientific Reports, 2016, Vol.6
    Description: Recently, nematode viruses infecting Caenorhabditis elegans have been reported from the family Nodaviridae, the first nematode viruses described. Here, we report the observation of a novel endogenous viral element (EVE) in the genome of Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, a plant parasitic nematode unrelated to other nematodes from which viruses have been characterised. This element derives from a different clade of nodaviruses to the previously reported nematode viruses. This represents the first endogenous nodavirus sequence, the first nematode endogenous viral element, and significantly extends our knowledge of the potential diversity of the Nodaviridae. A search for endogenous elements related to the Nodaviridae did not reveal any elements in other available nematode genomes. Further surveillance for endogenous viral elements is warranted as our knowledge of nematode genome diversity, and in particular of free-living nematodes, expands.
    Keywords: Plant Viruses ; Genomes ; Genomes ; Nematodes;
    E-ISSN: 2045-2322
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Nucleic acids research, November 2009, Vol.37(21), pp.7002-13
    Description: Long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons and endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are transposable elements in eukaryotic genomes well suited for computational identification. De novo identification tools determine the position of potential LTR retrotransposon or ERV insertions in genomic sequences. For further analysis, it is desirable to obtain an annotation of the internal structure of such candidates. This article presents LTRdigest, a novel software tool for automated annotation of internal features of putative LTR retrotransposons. It uses local alignment and hidden Markov model-based algorithms to detect retrotransposon-associated protein domains as well as primer binding sites and polypurine tracts. As an example, we used LTRdigest results to identify 88 (near) full-length ERVs in the chromosome 4 sequence of Mus musculus, separating them from truncated insertions and other repeats. Furthermore, we propose a work flow for the use of LTRdigest in de novo LTR retrotransposon classification and perform an exemplary de novo analysis on the Drosophila melanogaster genome as a proof of concept. Using a new method solely based on the annotations generated by LTRdigest, 518 potential LTR retrotransposons were automatically assigned to 62 candidate groups. Representative sequences from 41 of these 62 groups were matched to reference sequences with 〉80% global sequence similarity.
    Keywords: Retroelements ; Software ; Terminal Repeat Sequences
    ISSN: 03051048
    E-ISSN: 1362-4962
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