Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Type of Medium
Language
Year
  • 1
    In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 2012, Vol.44(7), pp.1388-1394
    Description: Physical fitness measures indicate health status, and these can be used to improve management of overall health. PURPOSE: This study aimed to describe the development of a self-reported fitness (SRFit) survey intended to estimate fitness in adults age ≥40 yr across four domains: 1) muscular strength and endurance, 2) cardiovascular fitness, 3) flexibility, and 4) body composition. METHODS: SRFit items were developed from the previously validated Rikli and Jones Senior Fitness Test battery of physical tests. Face-to-face participant interviews were used to refine SRFit item wording. Data from a pilot administration of the SRFit survey were used to guide further revisions of SRFit items. The Senior Fitness Test battery was used to evaluate the four fitness domains. The BodPod was used to measure body composition. Height, weight, and resting blood pressure were measured, and the revised SRFit survey was administered to 108 participants. RESULTS: Forty-five percent of the participants were women and 37% reported being black or in the “other” race category. Mean age was 53.5 ± 8.0 yr and mean body mass index was 30.6 ± 8.8 kg·m. Mean ± SD SRFit summary scores and correlations found between summary and fitness test scores were as follows: upper body strength = 12.8 ± 2.4, r = 0.59, P 〈 0.001; lower body strength = 12.6 ± 2.6, r = 0.68, P 〈 0.001; upper body flexibility (left side) = 12.3 ± 2.8, r = 0.47, P 〈 0.001; upper body flexibility (right side) = 12.4 ± 2.8, r = 0.67, P 〈 0.001; lower body flexibility = 17.4 ± 3.8, r = 0.55, P 〈 0.001; cardiovascular endurance = 12.9 ± 2.6, r = 0.66, P 〈 0.001; body mass index = 7.7 ± 2.23, r = 0.79, P 〈 0.001; and percent body fat = 7.7 ± 2.2, r = 0.78, P 〈 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: SRFit survey items in each fitness domain were correlated with analogous Senior Fitness Test items, indicating that participants can accurately use the SRFit survey to self-report physical fitness.
    Keywords: Medicine ; Physical Therapy;
    ISSN: 0195-9131
    E-ISSN: 15300315
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    In: Psychosomatic Medicine, 2014, Vol.76(1), pp.38-43
    Description: OBJECTIVE: Because it is not known whether particular clusters of depressive symptoms are associated with a greater risk of adverse cardiac outcomes, we compared the utility of four clusters in predicting incident coronary artery disease (CAD) events during a 15-year period in a large cohort of primary care patients 60 years and older. METHODS: Participants were 2537 primary care patients 60 years or older who were screened for depression between 1991 and 1993 and had no existing CAD diagnosis. Depressive symptoms cluster scores (depressed affect, somatic symptoms, interpersonal distress, and positive affect) were computed from responses on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale administered at baseline. CAD events, defined as the occurrence of a nonfatal acute myocardial infarction or CAD death during the follow-up period, were identified using electronic medical record and National Death Index data. RESULTS: There were 678 CAD events. In separate fully adjusted Cox proportional hazard models (controlling for demographics and cardiovascular risk factors), the depressed affect (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.04–1.20), somatic (HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.08–1.26), and positive affect (HR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.82–0.95) clusters each predicted CAD events. When the depressive symptom clusters were entered simultaneously into the fully adjusted model, however, only the somatic cluster remained predictive of CAD events (HR = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.03–1.23). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that the longitudinal relationship between overall depressive symptom severity and incident CAD events may be driven primarily by the somatic cluster.
    Keywords: Aged–Epidemiology ; Comorbidity–Mortality ; Coronary Artery Disease–Classification ; Depression–Epidemiology ; Female–Epidemiology ; Humans–Mortality ; Indiana–Statistics & Numerical Data ; Male–Statistics & Numerical Data ; Middle Aged–Statistics & Numerical Data ; Myocardial Infarction–Statistics & Numerical Data ; Proportional Hazards Models–Statistics & Numerical Data ; Prospective Studies–Statistics & Numerical Data ; Registries–Statistics & Numerical Data ; Time Factors–Statistics & Numerical Data ; Coronary Artery Disease ; Depression ; Depressive Symptoms Clusters ; Elderly ; Primary Care ; Prospective Study;
    ISSN: 0033-3174
    E-ISSN: 15347796
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    In: Medical Care, 2012, Vol.50(6), pp.534-539
    Description: BACKGROUND:: A simple method of identifying elders at high risk for activity of daily living (ADL) dependence could facilitate essential research and implementation of cost-effective clinical care programs. OBJECTIVE:: We used a nationally representative sample of 9446 older adults free from ADL dependence in 2006 to develop simple models for predicting ADL dependence at 2008 follow-up and to compare the models to the most predictive published model. Candidate predictor variables were those of published models that could be obtained from interview or medical record data. METHODS:: Variable selection was performed using logistic regression with backward elimination in a two-third random sample (n=6233) and validated in a one-third random sample (n=3213). Model fit was determined using the c-statistic and evaluated vis-a-vis our replication of a published model. RESULTS:: At 2-year follow-up, 8.0% and 7.3% of initially independent persons were ADL dependent in the development and validation samples, respectively. The best fitting, simple model consisted of age and number of hospitalizations in past 2 years, plus diagnoses of diabetes, chronic lung disease, congestive heart failure, stroke, and arthritis. This model had a c-statistic of 0.74 in the validation sample. A model of just age and number of hospitalizations achieved a c-statistic of 0.71. These compared with a c-statistic of 0.79 for the published model. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated model robustness. CONCLUSIONS:: Models based on a widely available data achieve very good validity for predicting ADL dependence. Future work will assess the validity of these models using medical record data.
    Keywords: Medicine ; Public Health;
    ISSN: 0025-7079
    E-ISSN: 15371948
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    In: The Clinical Journal of Pain, 2016, Vol.32(5), pp.388-393
    Description: OBJECTIVES:: Sleep disturbance, pain, anxiety, depression, and low energy/fatigue, the SPADE pentad, are the most prevalent and co-occurring symptoms in the general population and clinical practice. Co-occurrence of SPADE symptoms may produce additive impairment and negatively affect treatment response, potentially undermining patients’ health and functioning. The purpose of this paper is to determine: (1) prevalence and comorbidity (ie, clustering) of SPADE symptoms; (2) internal reliability and construct validity of a composite SPADE symptom score derived from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) measures; and (3) whether improvement in somatic symptom burden represented by a composite score predicted subsequent measures of functional status at 3 and 12 months follow-up. METHODS:: Secondary analysis of data from the Stepped Care to Optimize Pain care Effectiveness study, a randomized trial of a collaborative care intervention for Veterans with chronic pain. RESULTS:: Most patients had multiple SPADE symptoms; only 9.6% of patients were monosymptomatic. The composite PROMIS symptom score had good internal reliability (Cronbach’s alpha=0.86) and construct validity and strongly correlated with multiple measures of functional status; improvement in the composite score significantly correlated with higher scores for 5 of 6 functional status outcomes. The standardized error of measurement (SEM) for the composite T-score was 2.84, suggesting a 3-point difference in an individual’s composite score may be clinically meaningful. DISCUSSION:: Brief PROMIS measures may be useful in evaluating SPADE symptoms and overall symptom burden. Because symptom burden may predict functional status outcomes, better identification and management of comorbid symptoms may be warranted.
    Keywords: Medicine;
    ISSN: 0749-8047
    E-ISSN: 15365409
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    In: Alzheimer Disease & Associated Disorders, 2016, Vol.30(1), pp.35-40
    Description: Although persons with dementia are frequently hospitalized, relatively little is known about the health profile, patterns of health care use, and mortality rates for patients with dementia who access care in the emergency department (ED). We linked data from our hospital system with Medicare and Medicaid claims, Minimum Data Set, and Outcome and Assessment Information Set data to evaluate 175,652 ED visits made by 10,354 individuals with dementia and 15,020 individuals without dementia over 11 years. Survival rates after ED visits and associated charges were examined. Patients with dementia visited the ED more frequently, were hospitalized more often than patients without dementia, and had an increased odds of returning to the ED within 30 days of an index ED visit compared with persons who never had a dementia diagnosis (odds ratio, 2.29; P〈0.001). Survival rates differed significantly between patients by dementia status (P〈0.001). Mean Medicare payments for ED services were significantly higher among patients with dementia. These results show that older adults with dementia are frequent ED visitors who have greater comorbidity, incur higher charges, are admitted to hospitals at higher rates, return to EDs at higher rates, and have higher mortality after an ED visit than patients without dementia.
    Keywords: Medicine;
    ISSN: 0893-0341
    E-ISSN: 15464156
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    In: Medical Care, 1996, Vol.34(6), pp.537-548
    Description: The authors assess the factorial validity of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) for use in a clinical sample of disadvantaged, older adults with significant comorbidities. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed using LISREL VIII on data obtained from baseline face-to-face interviews with a clinical sample of 1,051 patients who were at risk for acute deterioration of their clinical condition due either to their age alone (75 years or older), or to their age (50 to 74 years old) and major comorbid conditions.An acceptable eight-factor measurement model reflecting the original specification (ie, subscales) of the SF-36 was obtained (chi-square to degrees of freedom ratio = 2.14; root mean squared residual =.055; adjusted goodness of fit index =.90). That model, however, required relaxing the assumptions associated with seven correlated error terms. Moreover, an alternative nine-factor model that allowed the ”getting sick” and ”getting worse” items to form their own factor, labeled ”health optimism,” fit the data significantly better (8 degrees of freedom chi-square improvement = 61; P 〈 0.0001).Although continued use of the SF-36 in older, disadvantaged, clinical samples is appropriate, further assessment of the underlying measurement model in other samples using confirmatory factor analytic techniques is needed to resolve the issue of correlated error structures and the existence of the health optimism factor.
    Keywords: Medicine ; Public Health;
    ISSN: 0025-7079
    E-ISSN: 15371948
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    In: Cancer Nursing, 2017, Vol.40(6), pp.454-463
    Description: BACKGROUND:: Empirically derived and tested models are necessary to develop effective, holistic interventions to improve positive health outcomes in adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer, yet few exist. This article is the second of 2 articles reporting on evaluation of the Resilience in Illness Model (RIM) as a predictive model to guide positive health research and practice. OBJECTIVE:: The aim of this study was to report the confirmatory model evaluation of the RIM. METHODS:: A confirmatory evaluation of RIM was done using baseline data from a sample of 113 AYA aged 11 to 24 years who were undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant and enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of a behavioral intervention to enhance resilience. Data were analyzed using latent variable structural equation modeling. RESULTS:: Goodness-of-fit indices supported RIM as a confirmed model that accounted for large amounts of variance in the outcomes of self-transcendence (62%) and resilience (72%), and in 3 of 5 mediators, specifically social integration (74%), courageous coping (80%), and hope-derived meaning (87%), as well as small to moderate amounts of variance in the remaining mediators of defensive coping (1%) and family environment (35%). CONCLUSIONS:: Findings establish the RIM as a plausible predictive framework for explaining ways AYA with cancer transcend their illness and achieve resilience resolution and for guiding intervention studies in this population. Additional research is needed to explore RIM’s transferability based on stage of illness, other chronic diseases, and cultural diversity. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:: Results support the RIM as an appropriate guide for developing and evaluating interventions to foster positive adjustment in AYA with cancer.
    Keywords: Adaptation, Psychological ; Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation -- Psychology ; Neoplasms -- Psychology;
    ISSN: 0162-220X
    E-ISSN: 15389804
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    In: Alzheimer Disease & Associated Disorders, 2013, Vol.27(4), pp.372-378
    Description: Little is known about health care use in the cognitive impairment, not dementia (CIND) subpopulation. Using a cohort of 7130 persons aged 71 years or over from the Health and Retirement Survey, we compared mean and total health care use from 2002 to 2008 for those with no cognitive impairment, CIND, or dementia in 2002. Cognitive status was determined using a validated method based on self or proxy interview measures. Health care use was also based on self or proxy reports. On the basis of the Health and Retirement Survey, the CIND subpopulation in 2002 was 5.3 million or 23% of the total population 71 years of age or over. Mean hospital nights was similar and mean nursing home nights was less in persons with CIND compared with persons with dementia. The CIND subpopulation, however, had more total hospital and nursing home nights—71,000 total hospital nights and 223,000 total nursing home nights versus 32,000 hospital nights and 138,000 nursing home nights in the dementia subpopulation. A relatively large population and high health care use result in a large health care impact of the CIND subpopulation.
    Keywords: Medicine;
    ISSN: 0893-0341
    E-ISSN: 15464156
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Annals of internal medicine, 01 September 2015, Vol.163(5), pp.339-46
    Description: Several methods are recommended equally strongly for colorectal cancer screening in average-risk persons. Risk stratification would enable tailoring of screening within this group, with less invasive tests (sigmoidoscopy or occult blood tests) for lower-risk persons and colonoscopy for higher-risk persons. To create a risk index for advanced neoplasia (colorectal cancer and adenomas or serrated polyps ≥1.0 cm, villous histology, or high-grade dysplasia) anywhere in the colorectum, using the most common risk factors for colorectal neoplasia. Cross-sectional study. Multiple endoscopy units, primarily in the Midwest. Persons aged 50 to 80 years undergoing initial screening colonoscopy (December 2004 to September 2011). Derivation and validation of a risk index based on points from regression coefficients for age, sex, waist circumference, cigarette smoking, and family history of colorectal cancer. Among 2993 persons in the derivation set, prevalence of advanced neoplasia was 9.4%. Risks for advanced neoplasia in persons at very low, low, intermediate, and high risk were 1.92% (95% CI, 0.63% to 4.43%), 4.88% (CI, 3.79% to 6.18%), 9.93% (CI, 8.09% to 12.0%), and 24.9% (CI, 21.1% to 29.1%), respectively (P 〈 0.001). Sigmoidoscopy to the descending colon in the low-risk groups would have detected 51 of 70 (73% [CI, 61% to 83%]) advanced neoplasms. Among 1467 persons in the validation set, corresponding risks for advanced neoplasia were 1.65% (CI, 0.20% to 5.84%), 3.31% (CI, 2.08% to 4.97%), 10.9% (CI, 8.26% to 14.1%), and 22.3% (CI, 16.9% to 28.5%), respectively (P 〈 0.001). Sigmoidoscopy would have detected 21 of 24 (87.5% [CI, 68% to 97%]) advanced neoplasms. Split-sample validation; results apply to first-time screening. This index stratifies risk for advanced neoplasia among average-risk persons by identifying lower-risk groups for which noncolonoscopy strategies may be effective and efficient and a higher-risk group for which colonoscopy may be preferred. National Cancer Institute, Walther Cancer Institute, Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, and Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute.
    Keywords: Colonoscopy ; Colorectal Neoplasms -- Diagnosis ; Risk Assessment -- Methods
    ISSN: 00034819
    E-ISSN: 1539-3704
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 2011, Vol.43(Suppl 1), p.5
    ISSN: 0195-9131
    Source: Wolters Kluwer - Ovid (via CrossRef)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages