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  • 1
    Article
    Article
    Language: English
    In: Zadok Perspectives, Spring 2014, Issue 124, p.4-7
    Description: I grew up in the Northern suburbs of Melbourne and had the joy of having a childhood full of fun and imagination.
    Keywords: Pastoral theology ; Life--Religious aspects ; Work--Religious aspects
    ISSN: 0810-9796
    Source: Informit (RMIT Publishing)
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 01 January 2015, Vol.10(7), p.e0131839
    Description: Degenerative joint disease and associated pain are common in cats, particularly in older cats. There is a need for treatment options, however evaluation of putative therapies is limited by a lack of suitable, validated outcome measures that...
    Keywords: Sciences (General)
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 3
    In: Child and Adolescent Mental Health, September 2013, Vol.18(3), pp.187-190
    Description: Byline: Wendy Simpson, Carolyn Brown, Nara Nisbet, Ruth Metcalfe, Zoe Claisse, Lorna Watson Keywords: Autistic disorder; diagnosis; school children; evaluation Background National guidelines stress the importance of early diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This pilot investigated the feasibility and acceptability of assessing children in their community. Method The pilot study was carried out from August 2007 to January 2009, and the roll-out of the programme started in 2010 and is currently underway. Workers undertook assessments and made a group decision about diagnosis; participant observation of these team meetings explored the decision-making process. Semistructured interviews and focus groups explored the views of parents and professionals. Results Seventeen children took part in the study: six were diagnosed with ASD; three as not ASD, and eight were referred for further assessment. The model was found acceptable to parents and workers. Conclusions With detailed consideration of administration, information, communication and training requirements, this approach has the potential to increase early diagnosis of ASD and reduce demand for specialist assessment.
    Keywords: Autistic Disorder ; Diagnosis ; School Children ; Evaluation
    ISSN: 1475-357X
    E-ISSN: 1475-3588
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  • 4
    In: Child and Adolescent Mental Health, November 2010, Vol.15(4), pp.217-223
    Description: UK‐wide concerns about availability, cost, efficacy and inappropriate use of psychiatric inpatient provision for adolescents have led to the development of new models of intensive community based care. This paper describes the Fife Intensive Therapy Team (FITT) model and provides an analysis of HoNOSCA (Health of the Nation Outcomes Scale for Children and Adolescents) data for 57 patients to evaluate the effectiveness of the service. Following intervention by the FITT, a substantial and significant reduction in HoNOSCA scores was recorded. The apparent success of the model has implications for the future development of acute mental health services for young people.
    Keywords: Young People ; Mental Health ; Intensive Therapy ; Community‐Based Services
    ISSN: 1475-357X
    E-ISSN: 1475-3588
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  • 5
    In: JAMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association, April 15, 1998, Vol.279(15), p.1148H(1)
    Keywords: Hiv Tests -- Public Opinion ; Pregnant Women -- Testing
    ISSN: 0098-7484
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  • 6
    Language: English
    Description: As life expectancy increases and mortality rates decrease, Australia is faced with an ageing population. This is particularly true of the population of people living with intellectual disability. Australian research has found that there is an increasing number of ageing parent-carers continuing to provide care for their adult child with an intellectual disability in the family home. Since deinstitutionalisation, many families made the choice to provide care at home, which may become a concern as they age and ask the question “who will care when I am gone?” The purpose of this study was to explore the reasoning behind decisions families made that resulted in them continuing to provide care in the family home, what barriers they experienced, and what plans they had in place for the future accommodation for their adult child with intellectual disability. A qualitative phenomenological approach was utilised for this study, through a social constructivist worldview. Semi-structured interviews explored the lived experiences of ageing parent carers who continue to care for their adult child with intellectual disability at home. Four families were interviewed for the study. Contrary to the findings of other studies, this study found that the degree of the disability of their adult child and the absence of informal support networks had no bearing on the decision for these families to continue to provide care at home. The families in this study perceived that the care they provide at home was better quality than the care that is provided in accommodation services. This perception was influenced by previous experiences in respite care. In addition to this, even though all of the families interviewed had wills in place, concrete plans for their son or daughter’s future accommodation and care were often vague, or non-existent other than financial bequests. Recommendations focused on improving the first and subsequent experiences in respite care by implementing strategies to improve the quality of care, perceived or real, provided in disability accommodation. Further recommendations include the introduction of funding to allow for planning sessions for families to navigate the legal system in regards to wills, financial bequests and guardianship. Final recommendations include the introduction of further education for service providers, Local Area Coordinators and NDIS Planners to have a greater knowledge of the challenges families face as they age yet continue to provide care, and to be better equipped to provide the information and resources to plan for the future of their adult child with intellectual disability.
    Keywords: Accommodation ; Intellectual Disability ; Ageing Parent Carers
    Source: National Library of Australia (Trove)〈img src=https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/Trove_reload.gif style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 2002, Vol.38(5), pp.459-472
    Description: In this study, we examined how close relationship partners spontaneously influence each other while they discussed an existing problem in their relationship. According to theories of social influence, people in important, self-defining relationships should experience the relationship itself as a potent source of influence. Thus, they are likely to rely on the relationship as a source of power and to use influence strategies that reference relationship norms and values. Consistent with this reasoning, dating partners who were subjectively closer to their partners/relationships were more likely to reference the relationship in their influence attempts than those who were less subjectively close. Furthermore, referencing the relationship was an effective influence strategy. Greater referencing was associated with opinion shifts during discussions for both agents and targets of influence, with each compromising toward the other's position. In contrast, greater use of negative coercion as an influence strategy (e.g., derogation of the partner or punishment) was associated with less compromise.
    Keywords: Sociology & Social History ; Psychology
    ISSN: 0022-1031
    E-ISSN: 1096-0465
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia, January 2014, Vol.41(1), pp.48-53
    Description: The current prevalence of onychectomy (declawing) in cats is unknown, and education regarding the procedure appears to vary greatly among veterinary schools. The purpose of this project was to determine the prevalence of onychectomized cats near Raleigh, NC and to document the frequency and style (laboratory or lecture) with which the procedure is taught in USA veterinary schools. One thousand seven hundred ninety four cats ranging in age from 8 days to 21 years, of which 938 (52.3%) were female and 1719 (95.8%) were sterilized. Data were collected over a 10-week period regarding cats seen for appointments in five veterinary facilities (two cat-only, two general, and one tertiary). Data collection included signalment and onychectomy status. During this time, 28 veterinary schools were polled regarding education of veterinary students in onychectomy. Three hundred and seventy four (20.8%) cats had undergone onychectomy. A significantly higher percentage of declawed cats were seen in the general practices compared with the other practice types ( 〈 0.030). Younger cats had a higher rate of onychectomy ( 〈 0.001). Twenty-six veterinary schools responded to the survey (93%). Fourteen (54%) of the responding schools did not include in their core curriculum a lecture or surgical laboratory providing instruction in the onychectomy procedure. Almost 21% of cats seen in veterinary hospitals near Raleigh, NC were declawed. Less than 50% of veterinary schools in the USA include a mandatory lecture or laboratory to teach the procedure. There appears to be a discrepancy between the popularity of the onychectomy procedure and the emphasis placed on relevant instruction in veterinary schools in the USA.
    Keywords: Cat ; Declaw ; Education ; Onychectomy ; Pain ; Sterilization ; Education ; Veterinary Medicine
    ISSN: 1467-2987
    E-ISSN: 1467-2995
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  • 9
    In: Toxicology Research, 2015, Vol.5(1), pp.34-44
    Description: Toxicological risk assessments in the 21 st century are increasingly being driven by the Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOP) conceptual framework in which the Molecular Initiating Event (MIE) is of fundamental importance to pathway progression. For those MIEs that involve covalent chemical reactions, such as protein haptenation, determination of relative rates and mechanisms of reactions is a prerequisite for their understanding. The utility of NMR spectroscopy as an experimental technique for effectively providing reaction rate and mechanistic information for early assessment of likely MIE(s) has been demonstrated. To demonstrate the concept, model systems exemplifying common chemical reactions involved in the covalent modification of proteins were utilized; these involved chemical reactions of electrophilic species (representing different mechanistic classes) with simple amine and thiol nucleophiles acting as surrogates for the reactive groups of lysine and cysteine protein side chains respectively. Such molecular interactions are recognized as critical mechanisms in a variety of chemical and drug toxicities, including respiratory and skin sensitization and liver toxicity as well as being the key mechanism of action for a number of therapeutic agents.
    ISSN: 2045-452X
    E-ISSN: 2045-4538
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association, 2015, Vol.51(2), pp.67-84
    Description: The robust advances in pain management for companion animals underlie the decision of AAHA and AAFP to expand on the information provided in the 2007 AAHA/AAFP Pain Management Guidelines for Dogs and Cats . The 2015 guidelines summarize and offer a discriminating review of much of this new knowledge. Pain management is central to veterinary practice, alleviating pain, improving patient outcomes, and enhancing both quality of life and the veterinarian-client-patient relationship. The management of pain requires a continuum of care that includes anticipation, early intervention, and evaluation of response on an individual-patient basis. The guidelines include both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic modalities to manage pain; they are evidence-based insofar as possible and otherwise represent a consensus of expert opinion. Behavioral changes are currently the principal indicator of pain and its course of improvement or progression, and the basis for recently validated pain scores. A team-oriented approach, including the owner, is essential for maximizing the recognition, prevention, and treatment of pain in animals. Postsurgical pain is eminently predictable but a strong body of evidence exists supporting strategies to mitigate adaptive as well as maladaptive forms. Degenerative joint disease is one of the most significant and under-diagnosed diseases of cats and dogs. Degenerative joint disease is ubiquitous, found in pets of all ages, and inevitably progresses over time; evidence-based strategies for management are established in dogs, and emerging in cats. These guidelines support veterinarians in incorporating pain management into practice, improving patient care.
    Keywords: Cat Diseases -- Therapy ; Dog Diseases -- Therapy ; Pain -- Veterinary ; Practice Guidelines As Topic -- Standards
    ISSN: 0587-2871
    E-ISSN: 15473317
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