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  • 1
    In: Nutrition & Dietetics, December 2012, Vol.69(4), pp.272-277
    Description: The study aims to examine the lived experiences of mothers implementing a special diet (cow's milk protein free) for a child under 12 while also continuing to feed their family. The second aim was to examine how these experiences impacted on their decision of whether or not to continue the diet. A phenomenological qualitative approach was taken. Semi‐structured telephone interviews were held with mothers of children participating in a six‐week dietary trial. Questions focused on their experiences of administering a special diet and influences on diet continuation after the trial. Interviews were voice recorded and transcribed. Thematic analysis was conducted using a constant comparative inductive approach with the aid of NVivo7 (QSR International Pty Ltd., Doncaster, Victoria, Australia). Twenty‐two parents were interviewed. Children participants were aged between 2 and 12 years (mean 6 years). Key themes arising about feasibility of the diet included maternal concern to please the entire family with food, sharing responsibility with the child and development of existing skills in food provision. Specialist medical advice impacted on continuation of the diet beyond the trial. This is one of only a few studies investigating how the extra burden of meeting the special dietary needs of one child, while feeding the family, is experienced by women. A more complete understanding of the barriers to implementing and sustaining dietary modification may eventually improve nutrition outcomes.
    Keywords: Food Habit ; Food Hypersensitivity ; Food Preference ; Mother–Child Relation
    ISSN: 1446-6368
    E-ISSN: 1747-0080
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Appetite, 01 August 2015, Vol.91, pp.321-328
    Description: This paper examines the motives and experiences of attendees at a Slow Food festival to gain an understanding of how people engage with ethical consumer projects. Slow Food is a global social movement aimed at promoting food that is regionally, ethically, and sustainably produced, and convivially consumed. The movement uses culinary tourist events, such as food festivals and farmers' markets, to promote its philosophy and attract new members. There have been no empirical studies of ethical consumption using a Slow Food event as a case study. This study uses an ethnographic approach and a framework of virtue ethics to explore the views of people attending a major Slow Food festival in the city of Melbourne, Australia. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 33 participants (19 consumers and 14 stallholders) to discover their rationales for attending the festival, and their perspectives on ethical consumption. Transcripts were coded and thematically analysed, resulting in three themes reflecting varying degrees of public virtues (altruistic motivations) and private virtues (personal wellbeing): the quest for virtuous lifestyles through ethical consumption, the importance of co-production, and the challenges of putting ethical consumer projects like Slow Food into daily practice. The findings reveal the manner in which virtue ethics affects foodways and highlights the contingent and challenging nature of practising ethical eating.
    Keywords: Slow Food ; Alternative Food Networks ; Food Habits ; Foodways ; Culinary Tourism ; Virtue Ethics ; Anatomy & Physiology ; Diet & Clinical Nutrition
    ISSN: 0195-6663
    E-ISSN: 1095-8304
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Appetite, August 1, 2015, Vol.91, p.321(8)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2015.04.066 Byline: Lauren T. Williams, John Germov, Sascha Fuller, Maria Freij Abstract: * Ethical aspirations influence food and foodways in western society. * Through a Slow Food festival, we study engagement in ethical consumption. * Slow Food event attendees vary in their aspiration for ethical consumption. * Ethical consumption expresses public (collective) and private (personal) virtues. * Barriers to implementation of these virtues exist in everyday lives. Article History: Received 15 October 2014; Revised 2 April 2015; Accepted 22 April 2015 Article Note: (footnote) [star] Acknowledgements: The authors acknowledge the work of Danielle Palmer in assisting with compiling data for the results.
    Keywords: Slow Food Movement ; Festivals ; Consumption (Economics)
    ISSN: 0195-6663
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: BMC Public Health, Oct 25, 2013, Vol.13(1)
    Description: Background Obesity prevention is a major public health priority. Despite the health risks associated with weight gain, there has been a distinct lack of research into effective interventions to prevent, rather than treat, obesity particularly at high risk life stages such as menopause in women. This paper describes the rationale for and design of a 2-year randomized controlled trial (RCT) (the 40-Something Study) aimed at testing the feasibility and efficacy of a relatively low intensity intervention designed to achieve weight control in non-obese women about to enter the menopause transition. Methods and design The study is a parallel-group RCT consisting of 12 months of intervention (Phase 1) and 12 months of monitoring (Phase 2). Non-obese pre-menopausal healthy females 44-50 years of age were screened, stratified according to Body Mass Index (BMI) category (18.5-24.9 and 25-29.9 kg/m.sup.2) and randomly assigned to one of two groups: motivational interviewing (MI) intervention (n = 28), or a self-directed intervention (SDI) (control) (n = 26). The MI intervention consisted of five consultations with health professionals (four with a Dietitian and one with an Exercise Physiologist) who applied components of MI counselling to consultations with the women over a 12 month period. The SDI was developed as a control and these participants received print materials only. Outcome measures were collected at baseline, three, 12, 18 and 24 months and included weight (primary outcome), waist circumference, body composition, blood pressure, plasma markers of metabolic syndrome risk, dietary intake, physical activity and quality of life. Analysis of covariance will be used to investigate outcomes according to intervention type and duration (comparing baseline, 12 and 24 months). Discussion The 40-Something study is the first RCT aimed at preventing menopausal weight gain in Australian women. Importantly, this paper describes the methods used to evaluate whether a relatively low intensity, health professional led intervention will achieve better weight control in pre-menopausal women than a self-directed intervention. The results will add to the scant body of literature on obesity prevention methods at an under-researched high-risk life stage, and inform the development of population-based interventions. Trial registration ACTRN12611000064909 Keywords: Obesity prevention, Intervention, Menopause, Motivational interviewing
    Keywords: Australians – Physiological Aspects ; Australians – Analysis ; Motivational Interviewing – Physiological Aspects ; Motivational Interviewing – Analysis ; Menopause – Physiological Aspects ; Menopause – Analysis ; Exercise – Physiological Aspects ; Exercise – Analysis ; Women'S Health – Physiological Aspects ; Women'S Health – Analysis ; Physical Fitness – Physiological Aspects ; Physical Fitness – Analysis ; Menopause – Research ; Middle Aged Women – Physiological Aspects ; Middle Aged Women – Analysis ; Weight Gain – Research ; Weight Gain – Physiological Aspects ; Weight Gain – Analysis
    ISSN: 1471-2458
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Appetite, 01 December 2014, Vol.83, pp.33-41
    Description: The 40-Something RCT aimed to determine if a 12-month health professional-led intervention could modify diet and physical activity behaviour for obesity prevention, in 44–50 year old, non-obese (BMI = 18.5–29.9 kg/m ) premenopausal women. Women were monitored for an additional 12 months to determine if effects could be maintained. This paper aimed to explore dietary and physical activity behavioural mediators hypothesised to be causally associated with weight change. Fifty-four women were randomised to a Motivational Interviewing Intervention (MI) (n = 28; five health professional consultations) or a Self-Directed Intervention (n = 26; written advice). Compliance to 10 study recommendations was measured at three months by a four-day weighed food and physical activity record including pedometer-measured step counts, self-reported exercise minutes and sitting time. The 10 compliance scores were independently assessed in mediation models for 12- and 24-month weight change. The MI effect on step count was an increase of 0.99 points on the 10-point compliance scale (p ≤ 0.01). This MI effect on step count significantly mediated the 12 and 24 month effect on weight (12 months AB = −0.74, 95%CI = −1.95, −0.14; 24 months AB = −1.06, 95% CI = −2.56, −0.36), accounting for 37.23% and 53.79% of the effect, respectively. The MI effect on vegetable serves was an increase of 1.50 points on the compliance scale (p = 0.02). The MI effect on vegetable compliance significantly mediated the effect on weight at 24 months (AB = −0.54, 95% CI = −1.50, −0.04), accounting for 24.92% of the effect. The remaining eight dietary and physical activity compliance scores did not significantly mediate weight loss. Encouraging women to take 10,000 steps and eat five vegetable serves per day may be a promising strategy to achieve long-term weight control at mid-life.
    Keywords: Nutrition ; Pedometer ; Mediator ; Obesity Prevention ; Motivational Interviewing ; Anatomy & Physiology ; Diet & Clinical Nutrition
    ISSN: 0195-6663
    E-ISSN: 1095-8304
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Appetite, 01 June 2018, Vol.125, pp.90-97
    Description: Given the increasing prevalence of childhood obesity in Malaysia, examination of family environmental factors is warranted. Reviews from developed countries report inconsistent findings on the relationship between parental-child feeding practices and child weight-related health outcomes. The current study aimed to examine parent-child feeding practices by familial-child characteristics in Malaysia. The Family Diet Study was conducted with urban Malay families and included a child aged 8–12 years and their main carer(s). Seven domains of parent-child feeding practices were assessed using the child feeding questionnaire and familial demographics, including socio-economic status, child anthropometry and dietary intake were collected. Inferential statistics were used to explore the relationships between variables. Of the 315 families enrolled, 236 completed all measures, with the majority of parent-reporters being mothers (n = 182). One-third of the children were classified as overweight/obese. Three domains of parent-child feeding practices had median scores of 4.0 out of 5.0 [ oncern about child overweight (CCO) (Interquartile range (IQR): 3.3, 4.7); pressure-to-eat (PTE) (IQR: 3.3, 4.5) and food monitoring (IQR: 3.0, 5.0)]. The domain of ‘perceived child overweight’ was positively associated with child age (r = 0.45, p 〈 0.001). Children who were overweight (F = 37.4; p 〈 0.001) and under-reported energy intake (F = 13.1; p = 0.001) had higher median scores for the parental perception of risk of child being overweight. Median scores for the CCO and PTE domains were significantly higher in low-income families (F = 7.87; F = 9.75; p 〈 0.05, respectively). Malay parents in this present study are concerned about their child's weight, particularly for those overweight. Family size, household income, and child weight status significantly influence parent-child feeding practices. Further research examining the cultural context of family environmental factors related to childhood obesity is warranted within Malaysia.
    Keywords: Child Feeding Practices ; Family ; Demography ; Body Weight Status ; Energy Intake Reporting ; Dietary Intake ; Anatomy & Physiology ; Diet & Clinical Nutrition
    ISSN: 0195-6663
    E-ISSN: 1095-8304
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Women and Birth, June 2014, Vol.27(2), pp.138-144
    Description: The prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing amongst women of child bearing age. The objective of this study was to investigate the views and attitudes of providers of antenatal care for women who have a body mass index (BMI) of 30 kg/m and over. A qualitative study using focus groups was undertaken within the department of obstetrics and gynaecology at a large teaching hospital in south-eastern Australia. Three focus group discussions were held. One with hospital midwives ( = 10), one with continuity of care midwives ( = 18) and one with obstetricians ( = 5). Data were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Six dominant themes emerged: (1) obesity puts the health of mothers, babies and health professionals at risk; (2) overweight and obesity has become the norm; (3) weighing women and advising about weight gain is out of fashion; (4) weight is a sensitive topic to discuss; (5) there are significant barriers to weight control in pregnancy; and (6) health professionals and women need to deal with maternal obesity. These themes are drawn together to form a model representing current health care issues for these women. Health professionals, who have a high BMI, can find it difficult to discuss obesity during antenatal visits with obese women. Specialist dietary interventions and evidence based guidelines for working with child-bearing women is seen as a public health priority by health care professionals.
    Keywords: Obesity ; Maternity Care ; Women'S Health ; Pregnancy ; Qualitative Study ; Medicine
    ISSN: 1871-5192
    E-ISSN: 1878-1799
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, March 2018, Vol.137, pp.160-172
    Description: To synthesize peer-reviewed literature that investigates the dietary intake by food group of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and compare intakes to national and international dietary guidelines. Four electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and Web of Sciences) were searched for studies that investigated the dietary intake of adults (≥18 years) with T2DM using the five main food groups (fruit, vegetables, dairy, grains and meat/meat alternatives). Food group intake in serves was compared against national guidelines and fruit and vegetable intake in grams was compared against the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. After screening 13,662 publications, 11 studies were included. All reported cross-sectional data. Majority of participants were consuming less than the recommended serves of fruit, vegetables, grains and dairy and were meeting or exceeding the recommended serves for meat/meat alternatives. Two of six studies reported fruit and vegetable recommendations were being met, two reported dairy recommendations were being met and two reported grain recommendations were being met. Of the five studies reporting intake in grams, four met the WHO minimum intake for fruit and vegetables. Individuals with T2DM do not comply with food group recommendations; particularly for fruit, vegetables, dairy and grains. Longitudinal research is required to better understand how food group intake changes over time after diagnosis.
    Keywords: Food Groups ; Diet ; Systematic-Review ; Type 2 Diabetes ; Dietary Intake ; Nutrition ; Medicine
    ISSN: 0168-8227
    E-ISSN: 1872-8227
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  • 9
    In: Nutrition & Dietetics, February 2017, Vol.74(1), pp.82-87
    Description: AIMChildren have the highest rates of food-related allergic reactions. While 85% of children outgrow allergies including cow's milk and eggs by five years of age, allergies to peanuts and seafood continue into adulthood. The school setting poses a high-risk environment for allergen exposure. The aim of the present study was to examine the availability, drivers and communication of school food allergy awareness and management policies/guidelines in one Australian education jurisdiction. METHODSA cross-sectional study comprising an online survey of principals on school allergy awareness (n = 100) was conducted in public, catholic and independent primary and high schools in an Australian education jurisdiction between August 2011 and November 2012. RESULTSSixty-three per cent (17/27) of schools responding to the survey reported using food allergy management guidelines. An average of 13 students per school were reported to have a food allergy with 93% of schools reported having students with at least one food allergy. Parents, not government policy, were identified as primary drivers of food allergy guideline implementation and a third of schools provided anaphylaxis training annually. Communication of food allergy management was limited with only 42 school websites either providing access to policies/guidelines or providing a food allergy statement. CONCLUSIONSDetailed awareness and management guidelines are integral for schools to adequately manage food-induced allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis, in the school environment. To enable this, national government support through legislation and policy is needed to ensure a consistent, up-to-date and policed approach to food allergy management in the Australian education sector.
    Keywords: Anaphylaxis ; Child ; Food Allergy ; Guideline ; Management ; School
    ISSN: 1446-6368
    E-ISSN: 1747-0080
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  • 10
    In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, August 2012, Vol.59(4), pp.294-301
    Description: Keywords: diet; lifestyle; mental disorders; qualitative research Background Poor diet is a contributing factor to the high rates of obesity and related comorbidities in people with severe mental illness, and dietary change is a key treatment strategy. Providing healthy lifestyle interventions is a recognised role for occupational therapists. However, the existing literature fails to elucidate boundaries of this role. To begin to address this gap in the literature, this study explored the attitudes, actions and beliefs of mental health occupational therapists about providing diet-related interventions. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with mental health occupational therapists working in one Area Health Service in New South Wales. Purposive sampling was used. Data were analysed using Constructivist Grounded Theory methods, where meaning is co-constructed by, and the theory ultimately grounded in the experiences of, the participant and researcher. Results The participants felt confident providing clients with interventions to promote diet-related skill development and providing general healthy eating education to support this development. However, they were not comfortable providing clients with specific dietary advice. Participants identified a need for further training and support to enhance their effectiveness in providing healthy eating education and highlighted the need for more dietitians in mental health services. Conclusions The occupational therapists in this study identified clear boundaries of their role in providing diet-related interventions for people with severe mental illness. Suggestions for improvement in this area included further training for occupational therapists as well as increased access to dietitians for those services that lie outside the occupational therapy role. Author Affiliation:
    Keywords: Diet ; Lifestyle ; Mental Disorders ; Qualitative Research
    ISSN: 0045-0766
    E-ISSN: 1440-1630
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