Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 13 October 2015, Vol.66(15), pp.B186-B186
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2015.08.470 Byline: Kundan R. Saripalli, Jonathan Yap, Tian Hai Koh Author Affiliation: (1) Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, Singapore, Singapore (2) National Heart Centre Singapore, Singapore, Singapore
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0735-1097
    E-ISSN: 1558-3597
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 05 April 2016, Vol.67(13), pp.1985-1985
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0735-1097(16)31986-6 Byline: Jonathan Yap, Ai Zhen Jin, Shwe Zin Nyunt, Tze Pin Ng, A. Mark Richards, Carolyn Lam Author Affiliation: (a) National Heart Centre Singapore, Singapore, Singapore (b) National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore Article Note: (footnote) Poster Contributions Poster Area, South Hall A1 Sunday, April 03, 2016, 3:45 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Session Title: Preventive Cardiology Potpourri Abstract Category: 33. Prevention: Clinical Presentation Number: 1236-377
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0735-1097
    E-ISSN: 1558-3597
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: International Journal of Cardiology, 15 November 2016, Vol.223, pp.318-319
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.08.206 Byline: Jonathan Yap, Arul Earnest, Vernon Lee, Gerald Sng, Carolyn Lam, Khung Keong Yeo Article History: Received 4 August 2016; Accepted 10 August 2016
    Keywords: Stress ; Psychosocial Factors ; Heart Failure ; Myocardial Infarction ; Cerebrovascular Accident ; Mortality ; Medicine
    ISSN: 0167-5273
    E-ISSN: 1874-1754
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: BMC Public Health, July 28, 2010, Vol.10, p.442
    Description: Background Effective influenza pandemic management requires understanding of the factors influencing behavioral changes. We aim to determine the differences in knowledge, attitudes and practices in various different cohorts and explore the pertinent factors that influenced behavior in tropical Singapore. Methods We performed a cross-sectional knowledge, attitudes and practices survey in the Singapore military from mid-August to early-October 2009, among 3054 personnel in four exposure groups - laboratory-confirmed H1N1-2009 cases, close contacts of cases, healthcare workers, and general personnel. Results 1063 (34.8%) participants responded. The mean age was 21.4 (SE 0.2) years old. Close contacts had the highest knowledge score (71.7%, p = 0.004) while cases had the highest practice scores (58.8%, p [less than] 0.001). There was a strong correlation between knowledge and practice scores (r = 0.27, p [less than] 0.01) and knowledge and attitudes scores (r = 0.21, p [less than] 0.01). The significant predictors of higher practice scores were higher knowledge scores (p [less than] 0.001), Malay ethnicity (p [less than] 0.001), exposure group (p [less than] 0.05) and lower education level (p [less than] 0.05). The significant predictors for higher attitudes scores were Malay ethnicity (p = 0.014) and higher knowledge scores (p [less than] 0.001). The significant predictor for higher knowledge score was being a contact (p = 0.007). Conclusion Knowledge is a significant influence on attitudes and practices in a pandemic, and personal experience influences practice behaviors. Efforts should be targeted at educating the general population to improve practices in the current pandemic, as well as for future epidemics.
    Keywords: Influenza -- Risk Factors ; Influenza -- Prevention ; Influenza -- Research ; Health Behavior -- Surveys ; Medical Personnel -- Surveys
    ISSN: 1471-2458
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: BMC Public Health, July 28, 2010, Vol.10, p.442
    Description: Background Effective influenza pandemic management requires understanding of the factors influencing behavioral changes. We aim to determine the differences in knowledge, attitudes and practices in various different cohorts and explore the pertinent factors that influenced behavior in tropical Singapore. Methods We performed a cross-sectional knowledge, attitudes and practices survey in the Singapore military from mid-August to early-October 2009, among 3054 personnel in four exposure groups - laboratory-confirmed H1N1-2009 cases, close contacts of cases, healthcare workers, and general personnel. Results 1063 (34.8%) participants responded. The mean age was 21.4 (SE 0.2) years old. Close contacts had the highest knowledge score (71.7%, p = 0.004) while cases had the highest practice scores (58.8%, p [less than] 0.001). There was a strong correlation between knowledge and practice scores (r = 0.27, p [less than] 0.01) and knowledge and attitudes scores (r = 0.21, p [less than] 0.01). The significant predictors of higher practice scores were higher knowledge scores (p [less than] 0.001), Malay ethnicity (p [less than] 0.001), exposure group (p [less than] 0.05) and lower education level (p [less than] 0.05). The significant predictors for higher attitudes scores were Malay ethnicity (p = 0.014) and higher knowledge scores (p [less than] 0.001). The significant predictor for higher knowledge score was being a contact (p = 0.007). Conclusion Knowledge is a significant influence on attitudes and practices in a pandemic, and personal experience influences practice behaviors. Efforts should be targeted at educating the general population to improve practices in the current pandemic, as well as for future epidemics.
    Keywords: Influenza -- Risk Factors ; Influenza -- Prevention ; Influenza -- Research ; Health Behavior -- Surveys ; Medical Personnel -- Surveys
    ISSN: 1471-2458
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 29 October 2013, Vol.62(18), pp.B213-B213
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2013.08.1449 Byline: Jonathan Yap, Khung Keong Yeo, Nadira Hamid, Eric Lim, Peter Ting, Hak Chiaw Tang, See Hooi Ewe, Zee Pin Ding Author Affiliation: (1) National Heart Centre Singapore, Singapore, Singapore (2) National Heart Centre Singapore, s, s
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0735-1097
    E-ISSN: 1558-3597
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: BMC Public Health, 01 July 2010, Vol.10(1), p.442
    Description: Abstract Background Effective influenza pandemic management requires understanding of the factors influencing behavioral changes. We aim to determine the differences in knowledge, attitudes and practices in various different cohorts and explore the pertinent factors that influenced behavior in tropical Singapore. Methods We performed a cross-sectional knowledge, attitudes and practices survey in the Singapore military from mid-August to early-October 2009, among 3054 personnel in four exposure groups - laboratory-confirmed H1N1-2009 cases, close contacts of cases, healthcare workers, and general personnel. Results 1063 (34.8%) participants responded. The mean age was 21.4 (SE 0.2) years old. Close contacts had the highest knowledge score (71.7%, p = 0.004) while cases had the highest practice scores (58.8%, p 〈 0.001). There was a strong correlation between knowledge and practice scores (r = 0.27, p 〈 0.01) and knowledge and attitudes scores (r = 0.21, p 〈 0.01). The significant predictors of higher practice scores were higher knowledge scores (p 〈 0.001), Malay ethnicity (p 〈 0.001), exposure group (p 〈 0.05) and lower education level (p 〈 0.05). The significant predictors for higher attitudes scores were Malay ethnicity (p = 0.014) and higher knowledge scores (p 〈 0.001). The significant predictor for higher knowledge score was being a contact (p = 0.007). Conclusion Knowledge is a significant influence on attitudes and practices in a pandemic, and personal experience influences practice behaviors. Efforts should be targeted at educating the general population to improve practices in the current pandemic, as well as for future epidemics.
    Keywords: Public Health
    ISSN: 1471-2458
    E-ISSN: 1471-2458
    Source: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    In: Circulation, 2018, Vol.138(Suppl_1 Suppl 1), pp.A13347-A13347
    Description: Introduction: Microvascular inflammation has been postulated to play a key role in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), especially in the presence of diabetes. In contrast to the wealth of preclinical data, clinical data on microvascular complications of diabetes in patients with HFpEF versus HF with reduced (HFrEF) are scarce.Methods: We investigated the prevalence, association with outcome and cardiac structure and function of the microvascular (neuropathy, nephropathy and retinopathy) complications of diabetes in 2,656 prospectively enrolled patients with diabetes and HF (536 with HFpEF) from the Asian Sudden Cardiac Death in Heart Failure (ASIAN-HF) registry.Results: A total of 601 (23%) patients had microvascular complications; nephropathy being the most prevalent followed by retinopathy (42%) and neuropathy (28%). Patients with HFpEF (LVEF ≥50%) more often had microvascular disease (28 vs. 21%), irrespective of confounders including duration of diabetes (Figure A; P 〈0.001). Compared to patients without diabetes, patients with diabetes and microvascular complications had higher filling pressures (E/e’〉15, OR 2.36; 95%CI 1.49-3.76), regardless of EF (Pinteraction〉0.1) and less left ventricular hypertrophy on echocardiography (Odds ratio [OR] 0.46; 95%CI 0.31- 0.67). Microvascular disease (vs no diabetes) was associated with higher rates of hospitalization for HF and/or mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.60, 95% CI 1.19, 2.15), irrespective of HF phenotype (Figure B; Pinteraction 〉0.5).Conclusion: Microvascular disease is more common in patients with diabetes and HFpEF, compared with diabetes and HFrEF, and correlates with higher filling pressures and worse clinical outcomes. These data support a key pathophysiologic role of microvascular disease in heart failure, particularly HFpEF.
    ISSN: 0009-7322
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    In: Clinical Cardiology, October 2015, Vol.38(10), pp.621-628
    Description: To purchase or authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/clc.22468/abstract Byline: Jonathan Yap, Fang Yi Lim,Fei Gao, Ling Li Teo, Carolyn Su Ping Lam, Khung Keong Yeo ABSTRACT Background Functional status assessment is the cornerstone of heart failure management and trials. The New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification and 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) are commonly used tools; however, the correlation between them is not well understood. Hypothesis We hypothesised that the relationship between the NYHA classification and 6MWD might vary across studies. Methods A systematic literature search was performed to identify all studies reporting both NYHA class and 6MWD. Two reviewers independently assessed study eligibility and extracted data. Thirty-seven studies involving 5678 patients were included. Results There was significant heterogeneity across studies in 6MWD within all NYHA classes: I (n=16, Q=934.2; P〈0.001), II (n=25, Q=1658.3; P〈0.001), III (n=30, Q=1020.1; P〈0.001), and IV (n=6, Q=335.5; P〈0.001). There was no significant difference in average 6MWD between NYHA I and II (420 m vs 393 m; P=0.416). There was a significant difference in average 6MWD between NYHA II and III (393 m vs 321 m; P=0.014) and III and IV (321 m vs 224 m; P=0.027). This remained significant after adjusting for region of study, age, and sex. Conclusions Although there is an inverse correlation between NYHA II-IV and 6MWD, there is significant heterogeneity across studies in 6MWD within each NYHA class and overlap in 6MWD between NYHA I and II. The NYHA classification performs well in more symptomatic patients (NYHA III/IV) but less so in asymptomatic/mildly symptomatic patients (NYHA I/II). Nonetheless, the NYHA classification is an easily applied first-line tool in everyday clinical practice, but its potential subjectivity should be considered when performing comparisons across studies.
    Keywords: Heart Failure – Analysis ; Associations – Analysis;
    ISSN: 0160-9289
    E-ISSN: 1932-8737
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 10 March 2018, Vol.71(11), pp.A1641-A1641
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0735-1097
    E-ISSN: 1558-3597
    Source: ScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages