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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Pediatrics, September 2012, Vol.130(3), pp.522-30
    Description: Herd immunity is an important benefit of childhood immunization, but it is unknown if the concept of benefit to others influences parents' decisions to immunize their children. Our objective was to determine if the concept of "benefit to others" has been found in the literature to influence parents' motivation for childhood immunization. We systematically searched Medline through October 2010 for articles on parental/guardian decision-making regarding child immunization. Studies were included if they presented original work, elicited responses from parents/guardians of children 〈18 years old, and addressed vaccinating children for the benefit of others. The search yielded 5876 titles; 91 articles were identified for full review. Twenty-nine studies met inclusion criteria. Seventeen studies identified benefit to others as 1 among several motivating factors for immunization by using interviews or focus groups. Nine studies included the concept of benefit to others in surveys but did not rank its relative importance. In 3 studies, the importance of benefit to others was ranked relative to other motivating factors. One to six percent of parents ranked benefit to others as their primary reason to vaccinate their children, and 37% of parents ranked benefit to others as their second most important factor in decision-making. There appears to be some parental willingness to immunize children for the benefit of others, but its relative importance as a motivator is largely unknown. Further work is needed to explore this concept as a possible motivational tool for increasing childhood immunization uptake.
    Keywords: Decision Making ; Immunity, Herd ; Immunization -- Psychology ; Parents -- Psychology
    ISSN: 00314005
    E-ISSN: 1098-4275
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Adolescent Health, July 2016, Vol.59(1), pp.130-132
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2016.04.016 Byline: Gregory D. Zimet Author Affiliation: Section of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana
    Keywords: Medicine ; Social Welfare & Social Work
    ISSN: 1054-139X
    E-ISSN: 1879-1972
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Vaccine, 27 November 2015, Vol.33, pp.D106-D113
    Description: Since the development of the “adolescent platform” of vaccination in 1997, hundreds of studies have been conducted, identifying barriers to and facilitators of adolescent vaccination. More recent research has focused on developing and evaluating interventions to increase uptake of adolescent vaccines. This review describes a selection of recent intervention studies for increasing adolescent vaccination, divided into three categories: those with promising results that may warrant more widespread implementation, those with mixed results requiring more research, and those with proven effectiveness in other domains that have not yet been tested with regard to adolescent vaccination.
    Keywords: Medicine ; Biology ; Veterinary Medicine ; Pharmacy, Therapeutics, & Pharmacology
    ISSN: 0264-410X
    E-ISSN: 1873-2518
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Adolescent Health, December 2015, Vol.57(6), pp.595-600
    Description: The purpose of the study was to explore parents' attitudes and beliefs about the nine-valent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV9). Online focus groups were conducted in January, 2015. The U.S. national sample of parents was recruited to four groups: (1) two groups of parents of HPV unvaccinated daughters aged 9–12 years and (2) two groups of parents of vaccinated daughters aged 11–17 years. Participants were 43 parents of vaccinated daughters and 38 parents of unvaccinated daughters. Results indicated low and variable levels of knowledge about HPV, related cancers, and vaccination (e.g., parents unaware vaccine is recommended for boys). Parents were encouraged that HPV9 covered more types, and many said they want the “better” vaccine. Parents of unvaccinated girls wondered whether they should delay vaccination until HPV9 was available, whereas parents of vaccinated girls wondered whether their daughters could be revaccinated with HPV9. Concerns were related to adverse reactions and side effects, whether another new vaccine will be released after HPV9, HPV mutation (i.e., will HPV types change over time—thereby necessitating multiple vaccines?), and cost. Physician recommendation was identified as the most important facilitator of vaccination, with participants wanting providers to exhibit high levels of confidence in and knowledge about HPV vaccines. Last, parents also viewed the prospective idea of a 2-dose HPV9 vaccine as positive. HPV9 recently became available in the United States and has the potential to offer greater cancer prevention if widespread acceptance and uptake occur. Understanding parental perceptions and questions about HPV9 will be important for clinical messaging about this vaccine.
    Keywords: Hpv Vaccines ; Human Papillomavirus ; Parents ; Vaccination ; Attitude to Health ; Focus Groups ; Medicine ; Social Welfare & Social Work
    ISSN: 1054-139X
    E-ISSN: 1879-1972
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Dec, 2015, Vol.57(6), p.595(6)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2015.09.003 Byline: Holly B. Fontenot, Vanessa Domush, Gregory D. Zimet Abstract: The purpose of the study was to explore parents' attitudes and beliefs about the nine-valent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV9). Author Affiliation: (a) Boston College, W.F. Connell School of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts (b) Complete Women Care, Long Beach, California (c) Department of Pediatrics, Section of Adolescent Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana Article History: Received 12 August 2015; Accepted 24 September 2015
    Keywords: Papillomavirus ; Papillomavirus Infections ; Vaccines ; Parenting
    ISSN: 1054-139X
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, December 2015, Vol.49(6), pp.S445-S454
    Description: Since the development of the “adolescent platform” of vaccination in 1997, hundreds of studies have been conducted, identifying barriers to and facilitators of adolescent vaccination. More recent research has focused on developing and evaluating interventions to increase uptake of adolescent vaccines. This review describes a selection of recent intervention studies for increasing adolescent vaccination, divided into three categories: those with promising results that may warrant more widespread implementation, those with mixed results requiring more research, and those with proven effectiveness in other domains that have not yet been tested with regard to adolescent vaccination.
    Keywords: Medicine ; Public Health
    ISSN: 0749-3797
    E-ISSN: 1873-2607
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Preventive Medicine, November 2013, Vol.57(5), pp.407-408
    Keywords: Human Papillomavirus Vaccines ; Health Communication ; Public Advocacy ; Cervical Cancer ; Screening ; Human Papillomavirus DNA Tests ; Medicine ; Public Health
    ISSN: 0091-7435
    E-ISSN: 1096-0260
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Health Psychology, 2012, Vol.31(1), pp.97-105
    Description: Objective: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a serious public health problem, due in part to low vaccination rates among high-risk adults, many of whom decline vaccination because of barriers such as perceived inconvenience or discomfort. This study evaluates the efficacy of a self-prediction intervention to increase HBV vaccination rates among high-risk adults. Method: Randomized controlled trial of 1,175 adults recruited from three sexually transmitted disease clinics in the United States over 28 months. Participants completed an audio-computer-assisted self-interview, which presented information about HBV infection and vaccination, and measured relevant beliefs, behaviors, and demographics. Half of participants were assigned randomly to a “self-prediction” intervention, asking them to predict their future acceptance of HBV vaccination. The main outcome measure was subsequent vaccination behavior. Other measures included perceived barriers to HBV vaccination, measured prior to the intervention. Results: There was a significant interaction between the intervention and vaccination barriers, indicating the effect of the intervention differed depending on perceived vaccination barriers. Among high-barriers patients, the intervention significantly increased vaccination acceptance. Among low-barriers patients, the intervention did not influence vaccination acceptance. Conclusions: The self-prediction intervention significantly increased vaccination acceptance among “high-barriers” patients, who typically have very low vaccination rates. This brief intervention could be a useful tool in increasing vaccine uptake among high-barriers patients.
    Keywords: Hbv Vaccination ; Self-Prediction ; Mere Measurement ; Temporal Construal
    ISSN: 0278-6133
    E-ISSN: 1930-7810
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Preventive Medicine, November 2013, Vol.57(5), pp.414-418
    Description: Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake in many countries has been sub-optimal. We examine several issues associated with non-vaccination that have received particular attention, including fears about sexual risk compensation, concerns about vaccine safety, inadequate vaccination recommendations by health care providers (HCPs), and distrust due to the perceived “newness” of HPV vaccines. Selective review of behavioral and social science literature on HPV vaccine attitudes and uptake. There is no evidence of post-vaccination sexual risk compensation, HPV vaccines are quite safe, and they can no longer be considered “new”. Nonetheless, research findings point to these issues and, most importantly, to the failure of HCPs to adequately recommend HPV vaccine as major drivers of non-vaccination. Most fears related to HPV vaccine are more related to myth than reality. In the absence of major health policy initiatives, such as those implemented in Canada, the U.K., and Australia, a multi-level, multi-faceted approach will be required to achieve high rates of HPV vaccination. It will be essential to focus on the education of HCPs regarding indications for HPV vaccination and approaches to communicating most effectively with parents and patients about the safety and benefits of vaccination and the risks associated with non-vaccination.
    Keywords: Human Papillomavirus Vaccines ; Attitude to Health ; Sexual Behavior ; Health Communication ; Medicine ; Public Health
    ISSN: 0091-7435
    E-ISSN: 1096-0260
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Preventive Medicine, March 2012, Vol.54(3-4), pp.277-279
    Description: Health beliefs have been found to be significant predictors of vaccine acceptability and uptake, including attitudes about HPV vaccine. In this study, we examined whether the predictive strength of health beliefs varied as a function of vaccine cost among adult women. During April 2009, data were collected from a nationally representative internet sample of 1323 US-resident women aged 27–55 years. Participants completed items related to sociodemographics, health beliefs, and HPV vaccine acceptability. Acceptability was measured at three levels of cost: free, $30/dose, and $120/dose. Multiple linear regression (MLR) revealed that health belief variables accounted for 29.7% of the variability in overall HPV vaccine acceptability. However, there was a linear and significant decrease in R values from 0.31 for a free vaccine, to 0.25 for a $30/dose vaccine, to 0.11 for a $120/dose vaccine. The results confirm previous findings that health beliefs predict HPV vaccine acceptability. However, the predictive strength of the association decreased with increasing cost. These findings suggest that interventions designed to increase vaccination by modifying health beliefs may have limited effect unless cost is minimized as a barrier.
    Keywords: Human Papillomavirus Vaccines ; Attitude to Health ; Women'S Health ; Health Care Costs ; Medicine ; Public Health
    ISSN: 0091-7435
    E-ISSN: 1096-0260
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