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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Applied Psychology, 2010, Vol.95(3), pp.488-502
    Description: Building on fairness heuristic theory, fairness theory, and trust development models, we argue that unfairly enacted procedures decrease followers' trust in the authority particularly when authorities have high power over their followers. Moreover, we expected trust to mediate procedural fairness effects on followers' attitudes (authorities' legitimacy and charisma attributed to authorities) and organizational citizenship behavior. Procedural fairness effects on these variables, as mediated by trust, should therefore also be stronger when authority power is high. The results of a single- and multisource field study and a laboratory experiment supported these predictions. These studies support the role of authority power as a theoretically and practically relevant moderator of procedural fairness effects and show that its effectiveness is explained through trust in authorities.
    Keywords: Procedural Fairness ; Power ; Trust ; Charisma ; Ocb
    ISSN: 0021-9010
    E-ISSN: 1939-1854
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Vocational Behavior, 2011, Vol.79(2), pp.470-483
    Description: Building on theoretical frameworks like the Job Demands Control model and Action Theory we tested whether the relationship between workload and employees' experiences of opportunities for workplace learning is of an inverted u-shaped nature and whether autonomy moderates this relationship. We predicted that – at moderate levels of autonomy – workload was positively associated with learning opportunities at low levels of workload, but negatively at high levels of workload. Also, we predicted that low autonomy prevents positive effects of moderate workload from materializing whereas high autonomy makes high workload less destructive to the learning process. Furthermore, we examined whether learning opportunities increase particularly as a function of higher matched levels of workload and autonomy and whether mismatch between workload and autonomy is particularly detrimental to the learning process. We found support for these ideas in two large and heterogeneous samples of working adults using moderated and polynomial regression analyses and subsequent response surface methodology. These results integrate conflicting prior findings and extend active learning hypothesis. They also have clear implications for job redesign practices aiming to promote workplace learning opportunities.
    Keywords: Workplace Learning ; Job Demands ; Job Demand–Control Model ; Action Theory ; Response Surface Methodology ; Business ; Psychology
    ISSN: 0001-8791
    E-ISSN: 1095-9084
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Applied Psychology, Nov, 2010, Vol.95(6), p.1121(13)
    Description: We developed a model predicting that leaders are most effective in stimulating follower cooperation when they consistently treat all group members in a fair manner and are prototypical (i.e., representative of the group's values and norms). In support of this idea, we consistently found that group members cooperated most when prototypical leaders treated themselves as well as their coworkers fairly across a laboratory experiment and 3 cross-sectional field studies. These findings highlight the important role of others' fairness experiences and perceptions in influencing one's own reactions and also the role of leaders as representing the group's values and norms. We discuss implications for fairness theory and the leader prototypicality literature. Keywords: procedural fairness, others' procedural fairness, OCB, cooperation, prototypicality DOI: 10.1037/a0020419
    Keywords: Leadership -- Research ; Leadership -- Psychological Aspects
    ISSN: 0021-9010
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, March 2012, Vol.117(2), pp.235-248
    Description: ► We integrate empowering leadership into relational fairness models. ► Encouraging self-development instilled a wish for status information in a lab study. ► It also strengthened the procedural fairness–OCB link, via status, in a field study. ► Encouraging independent action decreased the desire for status information. ► It also weakened the procedural fairness-OCB link, via status. We examined how procedural fairness interacts with empowering leadership to promote employee OCB. We focused on two core empowering leadership types— and . An experiment revealed that leaders encouraging self-development made employees desire status information more (i.e., information regarding one’s value to the organization). Conversely, leaders encouraging independent action decreased employees’ desire for this type of information. Subsequently, a multisource field study (with a US and German sample) showed that encouraging self-development strengthened the relationship between procedural fairness and employee OCB, and this relationship was mediated by employees’ self-perceived status. Conversely, encouraging independent action weakened the procedural fairness-OCB relationship, as mediated by self-perceived status. This research integrates empowering leadership styles into relational fairness theories, highlighting that multiple leader behaviors should be examined in concert and that empowering leadership can have unintended consequences.
    Keywords: Justice ; Procedural Justice ; Fairness ; Empowerment ; Empowering Leadership ; Organization Citizenship Behavior ; Autonomy ; Self-Development ; Business ; Psychology
    ISSN: 0749-5978
    E-ISSN: 1095-9920
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Economic Psychology, 2011, Vol.32(1), pp.120-130
    Description: Building on theoretical notions that severe sanctions (more than mild ones) can communicate that sanctioned behavior is morally unacceptable, we argued that particularly authorities who enact the sanction procedures in a fair manner stimulate compliance with their decisions. This is because such authorities should be considered legitimate to communicate what is morally acceptable and unacceptable. This interactive effect of sanction size and procedural fairness on compliance should thus be mediated by moral evaluations of the authority. A field survey and an experiment revealed support for these predictions. These results thus support a non-instrumental perspective on the effectiveness of sanction severity in increasing compliance with authorities.
    Keywords: Sanction Severity ; Procedural Fairness ; Compliance ; Moral Evaluations ; Business ; Psychology ; Economics
    ISSN: 0167-4870
    E-ISSN: 1872-7719
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: The Leadership Quarterly, October 2015, Vol.26(5), pp.878-891
    Description: All normative leadership theories suggest that disciplining followers that transgress moral norms is a crucial leadership task. However, leaders sometimes yet fail to do so. Previous research has indicated that leaders may refrain from enacting discipline out of self-interest or from concern for the organization’s interest. We explore another option: leaders may simply be unwilling to enforce moral norms because of a negative attitude towards them. We argue and show that leaders that construe norms on relatively low (i.e. concrete) levels are likely to see norms as annoying obstacles, whereas leaders that construe moral norms on high (i.e. abstract) levels will have a more positive view of norms. In line with this, high construal level leaders are likely to be willing to enforce moral norms through discipline in response to follower moral transgressions. Low construal level leaders, in contrast, actively avoid doing so. We show this effect in different contexts and for different types of leader discipline.
    Keywords: Leader Disciplinary Behavior ; Leader Cognition ; Construal Level Theory ; Intentionality ; Business ; Political Science
    ISSN: 1048-9843
    E-ISSN: 1873-3409
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: The Leadership Quarterly, Oct, 2012, Vol.23(5), p.883(14)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.leaqua.2012.05.006 Byline: Niek Hoogervorst, David De Cremer, Marius van Dijke, David M. Mayer Keywords: Leadership; Self-sacrifice; Power; Inclusion; Goals Abstract: Past research on leader self-sacrifice has focused entirely on the effects of this leader behavior on followers and its implications for organizations. The present research focused on antecedents of leader self-sacrifice. We argued that self-sacrifice is positively influenced by leaders' sense of belongingness to the group they supervise. Furthermore, leaders' subjectively sensed power can serve as a moderator of this effect. We expected this because a high sense of power is known to facilitate goal pursuit. Given that organizational goals often prescribe serving the interests of the organization, leaders' sense of belongingness should promote self-sacrifice particularly among leaders low in subjective power; leaders high in subjective power should display self-sacrifice regardless of their sense of belongingness. Two field studies supported these predictions. A final experiment supported a critical assumption underlying our argument in showing that the sense of powerxsense of belongingness interaction is restricted to situations that prescribe cooperative goals. When situations prescribe competitive goals, this interaction was absent. Article History: Received 4 October 2010; Revised 5 March 2012; Accepted 26 May 2012
    ISSN: 1048-9843
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: PLOS ONE, 2015
    Description: Lack of self-control has been suggested to facilitate norm-transgressing behaviors because of the operation of automatic selfish impulses. Previous research, however, has shown that people having a high moral identity may not show such selfish impulses when their self-control resources are depleted. In the present research, we extended this effect to prosocial behavior. Moreover, we investigated the role of power in the interaction between moral identity and self-control depletion. More specifically, we expected that power facilitates the externalization of internal states, which implies that for people who feel powerful, rather than powerless, depletion decreases prosocial behavior especially for those low in moral identity. A laboratory experiment and a multisource field study supported our predictions. The present finding that the interaction between self-control depletion and moral identity is contingent upon people's level of power suggests that power may enable people to refrain from helping behavior. Moreover, the findings suggest that if organizations want to improve prosocial behaviors, it may be effective to situationally induce moral values in their employees.
    Keywords: Social Sciences ; Sanctioning Systems ; Interested Behavior ; Workplace Deviance ; Limited-Resource ; Ego-Depletion ; Organizational Citizenship Behaviors ; Ethical Leadership ; Strength Model ; Identity ; Cooperation
    ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Economic Psychology, October 2017, Vol.62, pp.1-16
    Description: We investigated the interactive roles of procedural justice of the tax authority, trust in the tax authority, and identification with the nation in predicting voluntary tax compliance. Drawing from fairness heuristic theory and relational models of justice, we predicted that the relationship between procedural justice and voluntary tax compliance that has been found particularly among citizens with low (vs. high) trust in the tax authorities is restricted to citizens who weakly (vs. strongly) identify with the nation. The results of a field study with samples of Ethiopian and US taxpayers as respondents largely support our predictions. This research integrates the role of important and well-studied social psychological factors that shape voluntary tax compliance and reveals support for the hypothesis in a developing (i.e., Ethiopia) and a developed (i.e., US) nation – nations with strongly divergent tax climates.
    Keywords: Procedural Justice ; Cognition-Based Trust ; Identification With the Nation ; Voluntary Tax Compliance ; Business ; Psychology ; Economics
    ISSN: 0167-4870
    E-ISSN: 1872-7719
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Economic Psychology, February 2016, Vol.52, pp.24-37
    Description: We explored the moderating roles of legitimate and coercive power held by the tax authority in the relationship between procedural justice, trust in the tax authority, and voluntary tax compliance. Drawing from fairness heuristic theory and the slippery slope framework of tax compliance, we predicted that procedural justice fosters voluntary tax compliance, particularly when legitimate power of the tax authority is and when coercive power of the authority is . Moreover, we predicted that these interactive effects are mediated by (cognition-based) trust. Finally, we predicted that coercive power of the tax authority is positively related with enforced tax compliance. The results of a field study among Ethiopian business owners supported most predictions. This research is among the first to integrate social–psychological and deterrence-related factors to understand tax compliance behavior in a developing country.
    Keywords: Procedural Justice ; Trust ; Legitimate Power ; Coercive Power ; Voluntary Tax Compliance ; Business ; Psychology ; Economics
    ISSN: 0167-4870
    E-ISSN: 1872-7719
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