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Berlin Brandenburg

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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, 2004, Vol.92(5), pp.500-505
    Description: Corticosteroids have been used for many years for inflammatory diseases. Mood changes are common during short-term, high-dose, corticosteroid therapy. Virtually no data are available on the mood effects of long-term corticosteroid therapy. To evaluate mood during corticosteroid therapy using standard clinician-rated and patient-rated measures. Outpatients receiving prednisone therapy (7.5 mg/d for 6 months) and similar controls were enrolled. Current mood was evaluated using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD), Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), Internal State Scale (ISS), and a diagnostic interview. Twenty patients and 14 controls were enrolled in the study. Depressive symptom severity as evaluated by the HRSD and ISS depression and well-being subscales and global psychiatric symptom severity as evaluated by the BPRS and ISS perceived conflict subscale were greater in patients receiving prednisone than controls. Manic symptom severity as evaluated by the ISS activation subscale but not the YMRS was higher in patients receiving prednisone. Twelve (60%) of 20 corticosteroid-treated patients met diagnostic criteria for a lifetime prednisone-induced mood disorder. Activation subscale scores did not correlate with YMRS scores. Other ISS subscales showed expected correlations with clinician-rated assessments. Mood symptoms and disorders are common in corticosteroid-dependent patients. Unlike short-term prednisone therapy, long-term therapy may be more associated with depressive than manic symptoms based on the clinician-rated assessments. The ISS may be more sensitive to mood symptoms with prednisone than clinician-rated scales.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 1081-1206
    E-ISSN: 1534-4436
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: MRS Proceedings, 2004, Vol.824
    Keywords: Engineering;
    ISSN: 0272-9172
    E-ISSN: 1946-4274
    Source: CrossRef
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Journal of veterinary internal medicine, 2004, Vol.18(2), pp.165-75
    Description: Young adult heterozygous (carrier) female dogs with X-linked hereditary nephropathy (XLHN) have glomerular proteinuria but are otherwise healthy. Because data regarding dietary influences on the magnitude of proteinuria in dogs with spontaneous glomerular disease are not available, 12 such dogs were studied in a double crossover experiment intended to determine effects of altering dietary protein intake for up to 6 weeks. Dogs were blocked by urine protein : creatinine ratio (UPC) and randomly assigned to receive 2 diets: high protein (34.6% dry matter [DM], HP) or low protein (14.1% DM, LP) fed in HP-LP-HP or LP-HP-LP sequence. Food intake was measured daily, body weight (BW) was measured twice weekly, and UPC, plasma creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, phosphorus, albumin, and protein concentrations were measured at 2-week intervals. Nutrient digestibility was measured during the third treatment period. Diet had a significant effect (P .5), but unintended differences in digestibility of protein and energy (P 〈 or = .01) prevented assignment of the diet effect exclusively to protein. Proteinuria was greater (UPC 4.7 +/- 2.2 versus 1.8 +/- 1.1, P 〈 .0001) when the HP diet was fed, but the LP diet did not maintain starting BW or plasma albumin concentration within the normal reference range. Diet greatly affects the magnitude of proteinuria in XLHN carrier females. Dietary protein restriction can reduce proteinuria in dogs with glomerular disease, but BW and blood protein concentrations may not be maintained if the restriction is too severe.
    Keywords: Genetic Predisposition to Disease ; Dietary Proteins -- Administration & Dosage ; Dog Diseases -- Diet Therapy ; Kidney Diseases -- Veterinary
    ISSN: 0891-6640
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  • 4
    In: Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, March 2004, Vol.18(2), pp.165-175
    Description: Young adult heterozygous (carrier) female dogs with X‐linked hereditary nephropathy (XLHN) have glomerular proteinuria but are otherwise healthy. Because data regarding dietary influences on the magnitude of proteinuria in dogs with spontaneous glomerular disease are not available, 12 such dogs were studied in a double crossover experiment intended to determine effects of altering dietary protein intake for up to 6 weeks. Dogs were blocked by urine protein: creatinine ratio (UPC) and randomly assigned to receive 2 diets: high protein (34.6% dry matter [DM], HP) or low protein (14.1% DM, LP) fed in HP‐LP‐HP or LP‐HP‐LP sequence. Food intake was measured daily, body weight (BW) was measured twice weekly, and UPC, plasma creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, phosphorus, albumin, and protein concentrations were measured at 2‐week intervals. Nutrient digestibility was measured during the third treatment period. Diet had a significant effect .0001) on all measured variables except plasma phosphorus 〉 .5), but unintended differences in digestibility of protein and energy ≤ .01) prevented assignment of the diet effect exclusively to protein. Proteinuria was greater (UPC 4.7 ± 2.2 versus 1.8 ± 1.1, 〈 .0001) when the HP diet was fed, but the LP diet did not maintain starting BW or plasma albumin concentration within the normal reference range. Diet greatly affects the magnitude of proteinuria in XLHN carrier females. Dietary protein restriction can reduce proteinuria in dogs with glomerular disease, but BW and blood protein concentrations may not be maintained if the restriction is too severe.
    Keywords: Alport Syndrome ; Canine ; Genetic Disease ; Kidney ; Protein‐Losing Nephropathy
    ISSN: 0891-6640
    E-ISSN: 1939-1676
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