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  • 2009  (17)
  • Cinatl, J.  (17)
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  • 2009  (17)
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Medical Microbiology and Immunology, 2009, Vol.198(2), pp.79-81
    Description: The (possible) relationship between HCMV and cancer has been discussed for decades. Detection of viral DNA, mRNA and/or antigens in tumour tissues as well as seroepidemiologic evidence suggested a role of HCMV infection in several human malignancies. However, controversial clinical results from diVerent groups had raised skepticism about a role of HCMV in cancer.
    Keywords: Cytomegalovirus–Physiology ; Cytomegalovirus Infections–Complications ; Humans–Etiology ; Neoplasms–Virology ; Neoplasms–Virology ; Infections ; Viruses ; Cancer ; Pathology;
    ISSN: 0300-8584
    E-ISSN: 1432-1831
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Medical Microbiology and Immunology, 2009, Vol.198(3), pp.175-183
    Description: Influenza A viruses represent a continuous pandemic threat. In April 2009, a novel influenza A virus, the so-called swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV), was identified in Mexico. Although S-OIV originates from triple-reassortant swine influenza A (H1) that has been circulating in North American pig herds since the end of the 1990s, S-OIV is readily transmitted between humans but is not epidemic in pigs. After its discovery, S-OIV rapidly spread throughout the world within few weeks. In this review, we sum up the current situation and put it into the context of the current state of knowledge of influenza and influenza pandemics. Some indications suggest that a pandemic may be mild but even “mild” pandemics can result in millions of deaths. However, no reasonable forecasts how this pandemic may develop can be made at this time. Despite stockpiling by many countries and WHO, antiviral drugs will be limited in case of pandemic and resistances may emerge. Effective vaccines are regarded to be crucial for the control of influenza pandemics. However, production capacities are restricted and development/production of a S-OIV vaccine will interfere with manufacturing of seasonal influenza vaccines. The authors are convinced that S-OIV should be taken seriously as pandemic threat and underestimation of the menace by S-OIV to be by far more dangerous than its overestimation.
    Keywords: Swine influenza ; H1N1 ; Swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus ; Pandemic
    ISSN: 0300-8584
    E-ISSN: 1432-1831
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Neoplasia, January 2009, Vol.11(1), pp.1-9
    Description: Although human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is generally not regarded to be an oncogenic virus, HCMV infection has been implicated in malignant diseases from different cancer entities. On the basis of our experimental findings, we developed the concept of “oncomodulation” to better explain the role of HCMV in cancer. Oncomodulation means that HCMV infects tumor cells and increases their malignancy. By this concept, HCMV was proposed to be a therapeutic target in a fraction of cancer patients. However, the clinical relevance of HCMV-induced oncomodulation remains to be clarified. One central question that has to be definitively answered is if HCMV establishes persistent virus replication in tumor cells or not. In our eyes, recent clinical findings from different groups in glioblastoma patients and especially the detection of a correlation between the numbers of HCMV-infected glioblastoma cells and tumor stage (malignancy) strongly increase the evidence that HCMV may exert oncomodulatory effects. Here, we summarize the currently available knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that may contribute to oncomodulation by HCMV as well as the clinical findings that suggest that a fraction of tumors from different entities is indeed infected with HCMV.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 1476-5586
    ISSN: 20452322
    E-ISSN: 1476-5586
    E-ISSN: 20452322
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 01 April 2009, Vol.101(7), pp.441-3
    Description: Strååt et al. (1) show that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection induces telomerase activation in human malignant glioma cells and fibroblasts. These results reveal a novel mechanism that may be relevant for the potential of HCMV to promote oncogenesis and thus provide another piece of the puzzle that has drawn the attention of oncologists and virologists for almost four decades.
    Keywords: Cytomegalovirus -- Metabolism ; Glioma -- Enzymology ; Immediate-Early Proteins -- Metabolism ; Oncogenic Viruses -- Metabolism ; Telomerase -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 00278874
    E-ISSN: 1460-2105
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Current Molecular Medicine, March 2009, Vol.9(2), pp.131-151
    Description: Highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus can infect humans and is currently the most deadly influenza virus that has crossed the species barrier. As of December 2007, the spread of H5N1 virus from human to human has been rare. Nobody can predict if H5N1 may cause a pandemic. However, the number of human cases is continuously increasing and changes in virulence and epidemiology have been detected. There are specific pathogenic features of H5N1 infection. In contrast to human-adapted influenza A strains, H5N1 preferentially infects cells of the lower respiratory tract and may spread to tissues outside the respiratory tract in humans. Moreover, H5N1 replication is prolonged in target organs and results in higher viral loads and increased tissue damage. These features will have to be considered for therapeutic protocols for H5N1 infection in humans. Rapid genetic and antigenic changes observed in H5N1 virus isolates represent a challenge for the development of vaccines. In the present review, current knowledge about epidemiology, virulence factors and pathology of H5N1 infections in humans are summarised and discussed. Moreover, the possible roles of antiinfluenza drugs in the pandemic situation as well as the development of effective vaccines are subject of this overview.
    Keywords: Pathogenic H5n1 ; Avian Influenza ; Humans ; Of Chickens ; Epidemiology ; Epidemiology
    ISSN: 1566-5240
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Molecular Cancer, 01 September 2009, Vol.8(1), p.80
    Description: Abstract Background Chemoresistance acquisition may influence cancer cell biology. Here, bioinformatics analysis of gene expression data was used to identify chemoresistance-associated changes in neuroblastoma biology. Results Bioinformatics analysis of gene expression data revealed that expression of angiogenesis-associated genes significantly differs between chemosensitive and chemoresistant neuroblastoma cells. A subsequent systematic analysis of a panel of 14 chemosensitive and chemoresistant neuroblastoma cell lines in vitro and in animal experiments indicated a consistent shift to a more pro-angiogenic phenotype in chemoresistant neuroblastoma cells. The molecular mechanims underlying increased pro-angiogenic activity of neuroblastoma cells are individual and differ between the investigated chemoresistant cell lines. Treatment of animals carrying doxorubicin-resistant neuroblastoma xenografts with doxorubicin, a cytotoxic drug known to exert anti-angiogenic activity, resulted in decreased tumour vessel formation and growth indicating chemoresistance-associated enhanced pro-angiogenic activity to be relevant for tumour progression and to represent a potential therapeutic target. Conclusion A bioinformatics approach allowed to identify a relevant chemoresistance-associated shift in neuroblastoma cell biology. The chemoresistance-associated enhanced pro-angiogenic activity observed in neuroblastoma cells is relevant for tumour progression and represents a potential therapeutic target.
    Keywords: Medicine ; Biology
    ISSN: 1476-4598
    E-ISSN: 1476-4598
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Medical Microbiology and Immunology, 2009, Vol.198(4), pp.211-219
    Description: Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have recently been discovered as a central part of antimicrobial innate immunity. In the meanwhile, evidence accumulated that NETs are also generated upon non-infectious stimuli in various clinical settings. In acute or chronic inflammatory disorders aberrantly enhanced NET formation and/or decreased NET degradation seems to correlate with disease outcome. This review summarizes current knowledge about the relation of NETs in a broad spectrum of clinical settings. Specifically, we focus on the importance of NETs as a predictive marker in severely ill patients and further, we speculate about the potential pathophysiology of NETs.
    Keywords: Neutrophils ; Innate immunity ; Pathophysiology ; Neutrophil extracellular traps
    ISSN: 0300-8584
    E-ISSN: 1432-1831
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Medical Microbiology and Immunology, 2009, Vol.198(4), pp.257-262
    Description: A coupled luminescent method (CLM) based on glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase released from injured target cells was used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of antigen-specific HLA class I-restricted CTLs. In contrast to established methods, CLM does not require the pretreatment of target cells with radioactive or toxic labeling substances. CTLs from healthy HLA-A2 positive donors were stimulated by autologous dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with HLA-A2 restricted HCMV-pp65 nonamer peptides. HLA-A2 positive T2 cells or autologous monocytes pulsed with HCMV-pp65 nonamer peptide served as target cells. Lysis was detected only in HCMV-pp65-pulsed target cells incubated with CTLs from seropositive donors stimulated by HCMV-pp65-pulsed DCs. After 3 days, stimulation 38% of T2 cells and 17% of monocytes were lysed at an effector to target ratio of 8:1. In conclusion, CLM represents a highly sensitive, fast, material-saving and non-toxic/non-radioactive method for the measurement of antigen-specific CTL cytotoxic activity.
    Keywords: Cytotoxic T lymphocytes ; HLA-A2-restricted peptide ; Human cytomegalovirus ; Cytotoxicity ; Coupled luminescent method ; Dendritic cells
    ISSN: 0300-8584
    E-ISSN: 1432-1831
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  • 9
    In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 2009, Vol. 101(22), pp.1562-1574
    Description: Background Restoring p53 function by antagonizing its interaction with the negative regulator MDM2 is an appealing nongenotoxic approach to treating tumors with wild-type p53. Mutational inactivation of p53 is rare in neuroblastoma tumors at diagnosis and occurs in only a subset of multidrug-resistant neuroblastomas. Methods The antiproliferative and cytotoxic effect of nutlin-3, a small-molecule MDM2 antagonist, was examined in chemosensitive (UKF-NB-3) and matched chemoresistant neuroblastoma cells with wild-type p53 (UKF-NB-3r[DOX.sup.20]) or with mutant p53 (UKF-NB-[3.sup.r][VCR.sup.10]). Activation of the p53 pathway was assessed by expression analysis of p53 target genes, flow cytometric cell cycle analysis, and apoptosis assays. Mice with established chemoresistant tumor xenografts were treated orally with nutlin-3 or vehicle control (n = 5-10 mice per group) and were used to evaluate effects on tumor growth, p53 pathway activity, and metastatic tumor burden. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Nutlin-3 induced a similar activation of the p53 pathway in UKF-NB-3 and UKF-NB-[3.sup.r][DOX.sup.20] cells, as evidenced by increased expression of p53 target genes, [G.sub.1] cell cycle arrest, and induction of apoptosis. No such response was observed in UKF-NB-[3.sup.r][VCR.sup.10] cells with mutant p53. Oral administration of nutlin-3 to UKF-NB-[3.sup.r][DOX.sup.20] xenograft-bearing mice led to inhibition of primary tumor growth (mean tumor volume after 3 weeks of treatment, nutlin-3-vs vehicle-treated mice: 772 vs 1661 [mm.sup.3], difference = 890 [mm.sup.3], 95% confidence interval = 469 to 1311 [mm.sup.3], P 〈 .001), p53 pathway activation, and reduction in the extent of metastatic disease. The growth of UKF-NB-[3.sup.r][VCR.sup.10] xenografts was unaffected by nutlin-3. Conclusions Nutlin-3 activates the p53 pathway and suppresses tumor growth in this model system of chemoresistant neuroblastoma, provided that wild-type p53 is present. J Natl Cancer Inst 2009;101:1562-1574 DOI: 10.1093/jnci/djp355 [C] The Author 2009. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org. Advance Access publication on November 10, 2009.
    Keywords: Antineoplastic Agents -- Dosage And Administration ; Antineoplastic Agents -- Genetic Aspects ; Neuroblastoma -- Genetic Aspects ; Neuroblastoma -- Drug Therapy ; Neuroblastoma -- Research ; Tumor Suppressor Genes -- Physiological Aspects;
    ISSN: 0027-8874
    E-ISSN: 1460-2105
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Investigative ophthalmology & visual science, November 2009, Vol.50(11), pp.5419-25
    Description: Ocular involvement in influenza A virus diseases is common but usually limited to mild conjunctivitis. Rarely, inflammation of the choriocapillaris may result in atrophia of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Primary human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells were infected with seasonal (H1N1 A/New Caledonia/20/99, H3N2 A/California/7/2004) or highly pathogenic avian H5N1 (A/Thailand/1(Kan-1)/04, A/Vietnam/1203/04, A/Vietnam/1194/04) influenza strains. Influenza A virus replication was studied by investigation of cytopathogenic effects, immune staining for influenza A virus nucleoprotein, determination of virus titers, and electron microscopy. Apoptosis induction was examined by immune staining for activated caspase 3 and cleaved PARP. Proinflammatory gene expression was investigated by quantitative PCR. H5N1 but not seasonal influenza strains replicated to high titers (〉10(8) TCID(50)/mL; 50% tissue culture infectious dose/milliliter) in RPE cells. H5N1 infection resulted in RPE cell apoptosis that was abolished by the antiviral drug ribavirin. Pretreatment with type I interferons (interferon-alpha and -beta) or the type II interferon, (interferon-gamma), inhibited H5N1 replication. Moreover, H5N1 infection induced expression of proinflammatory genes (tumor necrosis factor-alpha, CXCL8, CXCL10, CXCL11, and interleukin-6), which was inhibited by ribavirin in a concentration-dependent manner. A novel cell type derived from the central nervous system was permissive to H5N1 influenza virus replication. This findings supports those suggesting H5N1 influenza strains to own a greater potential to spread to nonrespiratory tissues than seasonal human influenza viruses. Moreover, the data warrant the further study of the role of influenza A virus replication in retinal diseases associated with influenza A virus infections.
    Keywords: Influenza A Virus, H1n1 Subtype -- Physiology ; Influenza A Virus, H2n2 Subtype -- Physiology ; Influenza A Virus, H5n1 Subtype -- Physiology ; Retinal Pigment Epithelium -- Virology ; Virus Replication -- Physiology
    E-ISSN: 1552-5783
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