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  • Article  (41)
  • 2011  (41)
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  • Article  (41)
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  • 2011  (41)
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 02 August 2011, Vol.108(31), pp.12875-80
    Description: The Escherichia coli σ(E) envelope stress response monitors and repairs the outer membrane, a function central to the life of Gram-negative bacteria. The σ(E) stress response was characterized as a single-tier activation network comprised of ~100 genes, including the MicA and RybB noncoding sRNAs. These highly expressed sRNAs were thought to carry out the specialized function of halting de novo synthesis of several abundant porins when envelope homeostasis was perturbed. Using a systematic target profiling and validation approach we discovered that MicA and RybB are each global mRNA repressors of both distinct and shared targets, and that the two sRNAs constitute a posttranscriptional repression arm whose regulatory scope rivals that of the protein-based σ(E) activation arm. Intriguingly, porin mRNAs constitute only ~1/3 of all targets and new nonporin targets predict roles for MicA and RybB in crosstalk with other regulatory responses. This work also provides an example of evolutionarily unrelated sRNAs that are coinduced and bind the same targets, but at different sites. Our finding that expression of either MicA or RybB sRNA protects the cell from the loss of viability experienced when σ(E) activity is inadequate illustrates the importance of the posttranscriptional repression arm of the response. σ(E) is a paradigm of a single-tier stress response with a clear division of labor in which highly expressed noncoding RNAs (MicA, RybB) endow a transcriptional factor intrinsically restricted to gene activation (σ(E)) with the opposite repressor function.
    Keywords: Escherichia Coli Proteins -- Genetics ; RNA, Small Untranslated -- Genetics ; Regulon -- Genetics ; Sigma Factor -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 2
    In: Nature, 2011, Vol.471(7340), p.602
    Description: CRISPR/Cas systems constitute a widespread class of immunity systems that protect bacteria and archaea against phages and plasmids, and commonly use repeat/spacer-derived short crRNAs to silence foreign nucleic acids in a sequence-specific manner. Although the maturation of crRNAs represents a key event in CRISPR activation, the responsible endoribonucleases (CasE, Cas6, Csy4) are missing in many CRISPR/Cas subtypes. Here, differential RNA sequencing of the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes uncovered tracrRNA, a trans -encoded small RNA with 24 nucleotide complementarity to the repeat regions of crRNA precursor transcripts. We show that tracrRNA directs the maturation of crRNAs by the activities of the widely conserved endogenous RNase III and the CRISPR-associated Csn1 protein; all these components are essential to protect S. pyogenes against prophage-derived DNA. Our study reveals a novel pathway of small guide RNA maturation and the first example of a host factor (RNase III) required for bacterial RNA-mediated immunity against invaders.
    Keywords: Article;
    ISSN: 0028-0836
    E-ISSN: 14764687
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 2011, Vol.6(3), p.e17296
    Description: P-bodies are dynamic aggregates of RNA and proteins involved in several post-transcriptional regulation processes. P-bodies have been shown to play important roles in regulating viral infection, whereas their interplay with bacterial pathogens, specifically intracellular bacteria that extensively manipulate host cell pathways, remains unknown. Here, we report that Salmonella infection induces P-body disassembly in a cell type-specific manner, and independently of previously characterized pathways such as inhibition of host cell RNA synthesis or microRNA-mediated gene silencing. We show that the Salmonella -induced P-body disassembly depends on the activation of the SPI-2 encoded type 3 secretion system, and that the secreted effector protein SpvB plays a major role in this process. P-body disruption is also induced by the related pathogen, Shigella flexneri , arguing that this might be a new mechanism by which intracellular bacterial pathogens subvert host cell function.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology ; Medicine ; Infectious Diseases ; Microbiology ; Molecular Biology ; Cell Biology
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 01 February 2011, Vol.108(5), pp.2124-9
    Description: There has been an increasing interest in cyanobacteria because these photosynthetic organisms convert solar energy into biomass and because of their potential for the production of biofuels. However, the exploitation of cyanobacteria for bioengineering requires knowledge of their transcriptional organization. Using differential RNA sequencing, we have established a genome-wide map of 3,527 transcriptional start sites (TSS) of the model organism Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. One-third of all TSS were located upstream of an annotated gene; another third were on the reverse complementary strand of 866 genes, suggesting massive antisense transcription. Orphan TSS located in intergenic regions led us to predict 314 noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Complementary microarray-based RNA profiling verified a high number of noncoding transcripts and identified strong ncRNA regulations. Thus, ∼64% of all TSS give rise to antisense or ncRNAs in a genome that is to 87% protein coding. Our data enhance the information on promoters by a factor of 40, suggest the existence of additional small peptide-encoding mRNAs, and provide corrected 5' annotations for many genes of this cyanobacterium. The global TSS map will facilitate the use of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 as a model organism for further research on photosynthesis and energy research.
    Keywords: Transcription, Genetic ; Synechocystis -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2011, Vol.108(5), pp.2124-2129
    Description: There has been an increasing interest in cyanobacteria because these photosynthetic organisms convert solar energy into biomass and because of their potential for the production of biofuels. However, the exploitation of cyanobacteria for bioengineering requires knowledge of their transcriptional organization. Using differential RNA sequencing, we have established a genome-wide map of 3,527 transcriptional start sites (TSS) of the model organism Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. One-third of all TSS were located upstream of an annotated gene; another third were on the reverse complementary strand of 866 genes, suggesting massive antisense transcription. Orphan TSS located in intergenic regions led us to predict 314 noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Complementary microarray-based RNA profiling verified a high number of noncoding transcripts and identified strong ncRNA regulations. Thus, ~64% of all TSS give rise to antisense or ncRNAs in a genome that is to 87% protein coding. Our data enhance the information on promoters by a factor of 40, suggest the existence of additional small peptide-encoding mRNAs, and provide corrected 5' annotations for many genes of this cyanobacterium. The global TSS map will facilitate the use of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 as a model organism for further research on photosynthesis and energy research. ; Includes references ; p. 2124-2129.
    Keywords: Transcription (Genetics) -- Physiological Aspects ; Cyanobacteria -- Genetic Aspects ; Genetic Regulation -- Research ; Rna Polymerases -- Properties;
    ISSN: 0027-8424
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  • 6
    In: Molecular Microbiology, November 2011, Vol.82(4), pp.797-806
    Description: Founded on ground‐breaking discoveries such as the operon model by Jacob and Monod more than 50 years ago, molecular microbiology is now one of the most vibrant disciplines of the life sciences. The first Mol Micro Meeting Würzburg (‘M3W’) hosted more than 160 scientists from 14 countries to exchange their latest ideas in this field of research. Divided into the four main sessions Gene Regulation, Pathogenesis, Microbial Cell Biology and Signalling, the conference provided insight into current advances and future goals and challenges.
    Keywords: Microbiology ; Life Sciences ; Scientists ; Bacteria;
    ISSN: 0950-382X
    E-ISSN: 1365-2958
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  • 7
    In: EMBO Journal, 18 May 2011, Vol.30(10), pp.1977-1989
    Description: MicroRNAs have well‐established roles in eukaryotic host responses to viruses and extracellular bacterial pathogens. In contrast, microRNA responses to invasive bacteria have remained unknown. Here, we report cell type‐dependent microRNA regulations upon infection of mammalian cells with the enteroinvasive pathogen, Typhimurium. Murine macrophages strongly upregulate NF‐κB associated microRNAs; strikingly, these regulations which are induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) occur and persist regardless of successful host invasion and/or replication, or whether an inflammatory response is mounted, suggesting that microRNAs belong to the first line of anti‐bacterial defence. However, a suppression of the global immune regulator miR‐155 in endotoxin‐tolerant macrophages revealed that microRNA responses also depend on the status of infected cells. This study identifies the family as the common denominator of ‐regulated microRNAs in macrophages and epithelial cells, and suggests that repression of relieves cytokine IL‐6 and IL‐10 mRNAs from negative post‐transcriptional control. Our results establish a paradigm of microRNA‐mediated feed‐forward activation of inflammatory factors when mammalian cells are targeted by bacterial pathogens. This study describes the global mammalian micoRNA response to infection and the role of miRNAs in regulating the post‐transcriptional control of inflammatory cytokines.
    Keywords: Il‐10 ; Let‐7 ; Mir‐155 ; Mirna ; Salmonella
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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  • 8
    In: Nature Reviews Microbiology, 2011, Vol.9(8), p.578
    Description: Hfq is an RNA-binding protein that is common to diverse bacterial lineages and has key roles in the control of gene expression. By facilitating the pairing of small RNAs with their target mRNAs, Hfq affects the translation and turnover rates of specific transcripts and contributes to complex post-transcriptional networks. These functions of Hfq can be attributed to its ring-like oligomeric architecture, which presents two non-equivalent binding surfaces that are capable of multiple interactions with RNA molecules. Distant homologues of Hfq occur in archaea and eukaryotes, reflecting an ancient origin for the protein family and hinting at shared functions. In this Review, we describe the salient structural and functional features of Hfq and discuss possible mechanisms by which this protein can promote RNA interactions to catalyse specific and rapid regulatory responses in vivo.
    Keywords: Biology;
    ISSN: 1740-1526
    E-ISSN: 17401534
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Molecular Cell, 2011, Vol.41(3), pp.245-246
    Description: Spot42 is a paradigm for small RNAs that fine-tune carbon metabolism. In this issue of , reveal that this conserved RNA acts through a multioutput feedforward loop to modulate the global dynamics of sugar consumption.
    Keywords: Biology
    ISSN: 1097-2765
    E-ISSN: 1097-4164
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  • 10
    In: Molecular Microbiology, September 2011, Vol.81(5), pp.1144-1165
    Description: GcvB is one of the most highly conserved Hfq‐associated small RNAs in Gram‐negative bacteria and was previously reported to repress several ABC transporters for amino acids. To determine the full extent of GcvB‐mediated regulation in , we combined a genome‐wide experimental approach with biocomputational target prediction. Comparative pulse expression of wild‐type versus mutant sRNA variants revealed that GcvB governs a large post‐transcriptional regulon, impacting ∼1% of all genes via its conserved G/U‐rich domain R1. Complementary predictions of C/A‐rich binding sites in mRNAs and reporter fusion experiments increased the number of validated GcvB targets to more than 20, and doubled the number of regulated amino acid transporters. Unlike the previously described targeting via the single R1 domain, GcvB represses the glycine transporter CycA by exceptionally redundant base‐pairing. This novel ability of GcvB is focused upon the one target that could feedback‐regulate the glycine‐responsive synthesis of GcvB. Several newly discovered mRNA targets involved in amino acid metabolism, including the global regulator Lrp, question the previous assumption that GcvB simply acts to limit unnecessary amino acid uptake. Rather, GcvB rewires primary transcriptional control circuits and seems to act as a distinct regulatory node in amino acid metabolism.
    Keywords: Glycine -- Physiological Aspects ; Genetic Research -- Physiological Aspects ; Genomics -- Physiological Aspects ; Messenger Rna -- Physiological Aspects;
    ISSN: 0950-382X
    E-ISSN: 1365-2958
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