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  • 2014  (11)
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  • 2014  (11)
  • 1
    In: Water Resources Research, May 2014, Vol.50(5), pp.4514-4529
    Description: A major difficulty in modeling multiphase flow in porous media is the emergence of trapped phases. Our experiments demonstrate that gas can be trapped in either single‐pores, multipores, or in large connected networks. These large connected clusters can comprise up to eight grain volumes and can contain up to 50% of the whole trapped gas volume. About 85% of the gas volume is trapped by gas clusters. This variety of possible trapped gas clusters of different shape and volume will lead to a better process understanding of bubble‐mediated mass transfer. Since multipore gas bubbles are in contact with the solid surface through ultrathin adsorbed water films the interfacial area between trapped gas clusters and intergranular capillary water is only about 80% of the total gas surface. We could derive a significant (R = 0.98) linear relationship between the gas‐water‐interface and gas saturation. We found no systematic dependency of the front velocity of the invading water phase in the velocity range from 0.1 to 0.6 cm/min corresponding to capillary numbers from 2 × 10 to 10. Our experimental results indicate that the capillary trapping mechanism is controlled by the local pore structure and local connectivity and not by thermodynamics, i.e., by the minimum of the , at least in the considered velocity range. Consistent with this physical picture is our finding that the trapping frequency (= bubble‐size distribution) reflects the pore size distribution for the whole range of pore radii, i.e., the capillary trapping process is determined by statistics and not by thermodynamics. No systematic dependency of trapping efficiency on capillary number Majority of trapped gas bubbles (85%) are multipore trapped Trapping of gas clusters is determined by statistics and not by thermodynamics
    Keywords: Gas Clusters ; Capillary Trapping ; Interfacial Area
    ISSN: 0043-1397
    E-ISSN: 1944-7973
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Geoderma, April 2014, Vol.217-218, pp.181-189
    Description: The study characterized soil structure development and evolution in six plots that were amended with varying amounts of animal manure (AM) and NPK fertilizer over a period of 106 years in a long-term fertilization experiment in Bad Lauchstädt, Germany. Two intact soil cores (10-cm diameter and 8-cm tall) and bulk soil samples were extracted from a depth between 5 and 15-cm from each plot. Soil properties including texture, organic carbon, soil–water characteristic, air permeability and diffusivity were measured and analyzed along with X-ray computed tomography (CT) data. Long-term applications of AM and NPK had a major impact on soil organic carbon content which increased from 0.015 kg kg (unfertilized plot) to 0.024 kg kg (well fertilized plot, 30 T ha 2y AM with NPK). Total porosity linearly followed the organic carbon gradient, increasing from 0.36 to 0.43 m m . The water holding capacity of the soil was considerably increased with the increase of AM and NPK applications. Gas diffusivity and air permeability measurements clearly indicated that the level of soil aeration improved with increasing AM and NPK fertilizer amount. The three-dimensional X-ray CT visualizations revealed higher macroporosity and biological (earthworm) activity in the well fertilized areas when compared to plots without or only a small amount of fertilizer applied. A combined evaluation of the soil water characteristic, gas transport and X-ray CT results suggested that pore size distributions widened, and pore connectivity was significantly improved with increasing fertilizer amount. Furthermore, the soils fertilized with both AM and NPK showed a more aggregated structure than soils amended with AM only.
    Keywords: Animal Manure ; Npk Fertilizers ; Soil–Water Characteristic ; Gas Diffusivity ; Air Permeability ; X-Ray Computed Tomography ; Agriculture
    ISSN: 0016-7061
    E-ISSN: 1872-6259
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Vadose Zone Journal, 2014, Vol.13(8), p.0
    Description: Root system architecture and associated root–soil interactions exhibit large changes over time. Nondestructive methods for the quantification of root systems and their temporal development are needed to improve our understanding of root activity in natural soils. X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT) was used to visualize and quantify growth of a single Vicia faba L. root system during a drying period. The plant was grown under controlled conditions in a sandy soil mixture and imaged every second day. Minkowski functionals and Euclidean distance transform were used to quantify root architectural traits. We were able to image the root system with water content decreasing from 29.6 to 6.75%. Root length was slightly underestimated compared with destructive measurements. Based on repeated measurements over time it was possible to quantify the dynamics of root growth and the demography of roots along soil depth. Measurement of Euclidean distances from any point within the soil to the nearest root surface yielded a frequency distribution of travel distances for water and nutrients towards roots. Our results demonstrate that a meaningful quantitative characterization of root systems and their temporal dynamics is possible.
    Keywords: Agriculture;
    ISSN: Vadose Zone Journal
    E-ISSN: 1539-1663
    Source: CrossRef
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  • 4
    In: Soil Science, 2014, Vol.179(6), pp.273-283
    Description: ABSTRACT: Soil aggregates are useful indicators of soil structure and stability, and the impact on physical and mechanical aggregate properties is critical for the sustainable use of organic amendments in agricultural soil. In this work, we evaluated the short-term soil quality effects of applying biochar (0–10 kg m), in combination with swine manure (2.1 and 4.2 kg m), to a no-till maize (Zea mays L.) cropping system on a sandy loam soil in Denmark. Topsoil (0–20 cm) aggregates were analyzed for clay dispersibility, aggregate stability, tensile strength (TS), and specific rupture energy (SRE) using end-over-end shaking, a Yoder-type wet-sieving method, and an unconfined compression test in soil samples collected 7 and 19 months after final biochar application. The highest rates of biochar and swine manure application resulted in the highest aggregate stability and lowest clay dispersibility. Applying both amendments systematically increased TS and SRE for large aggregates (4–8 and 8–16 mm) but not for small aggregates (1–2 and 2–4 mm). Increased biochar application also decreased the friability index of soil aggregates. Based on X-ray visualization, it was found that aggregates containing larger amounts of biochar particles had higher TS and SRE probably because of bonding effects. Based on the improved soil aggregate properties, we suggest that biochar can be effective for increasing and sustaining overall soil quality, for example, related to minimizing the soil erosion potential.
    Keywords: Denmark ; Corn ; Soil Sciences ; Sustainable Development ; Organic Farming ; Tensile Strength ; Clay ; Soil Erosion Control;
    ISSN: 0038-075X
    E-ISSN: 15389243
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Soil Science Society of America Journal, 2014, Vol.78(4), p.1239
    Description: The impact of biodiversity loss on soil functions is well established via laboratory experiments that generally consider soil biota groups in isolation from each other, a condition rarely present in field soils. As a result, our knowledge about anthropogenic-induced changes in biodiversity and associated soil functions is limited. We quantified an array of soil biological constituents (plants, earthworms, nematodes, bacteria, and fungi) to explore their interactions and to characterize their influence on various soil functions (habitat for soil organisms, air and water regulation, and recycling of nutrients and organic waste) along a legacy Cu pollution gradient. Increasing Cu concentrations had a detrimental impact on both plant growth and species richness. Belowground soil biota showed similar responses, with their sensitivity to elevated Cu concentrations decreasing in the order: earthworms bacteria nematodes fungi. The observed loss of soil biota adversely affected natural soil bioturbation, aggregate formation and stabilization, and decomposition and mineralization processes and therefore resulted in compacted soil with narrow pore size distributions and overall smaller pores, restricted air and water storage and flow, and impeded C, N, and P cycling. The simultaneous evolution of soil biodiversity and functions along the Cu gradient emphasized the key role of soil life in controlling ecosystem services. Furthermore, results indicated that different soil biodiversity and functional indicators started to decline (10% loss) within a Cu concentration range of 110 to 800 mg total Cu kg sigma up -1 greater than or equal to
    Keywords: Plants (Organisms) ; Bacteria ; Soil (Material) ; Fungi ; Porosity ; Biodiversity ; Copper ; Nematodes ; Pollution, Conservation, and Health Management (CE);
    ISSN: Soil Science Society of America Journal
    E-ISSN: 0361-5995
    E-ISSN: 14350661
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: ASA, CSSA & SSSA International Annual Meeting " Grand challenges, great solutions", 2014
    Description: absent
    Keywords: Sciences of the Universe ; Earth Sciences
    Source: Hyper Article en Ligne (CCSd)
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the Complex Soil Systems Conference “A Path to Improved Understanding of Complex Soil Systems”. 2014; Complex Soil Systems “A Path to Improved Understanding of Complex Soil Systems”, Berkeley, USA, 2014-09-03-2014-09-05, 136-137, 2014
    Keywords: Modélisation Des Sols ; Sciences De La Terre ; Earth Sciences ; Partenariat De Recherche ; Sol ; Expert Scientifique ; Soil
    Source: AGRIS (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)
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  • 8
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the Complex Soil Systems Conference “A Path to Improved Understanding of Complex Soil Systems”. 2014; Complex Soil Systems “A Path to Improved Understanding of Complex Soil Systems”, Berkeley, USA, 2014-09-03-2014-09-05, 136-137, 2014
    Keywords: Modélisation Des Sols ; Sciences De La Terre ; Earth Sciences ; Partenariat De Recherche ; Sol ; Expert Scientifique ; Soil
    Source: AGRIS (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of biological chemistry, 18 April 2014, Vol.289(16), pp.11068-82
    Description: Recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) following cardiac injury, such as myocardial infarction, plays a critical role in tissue repair and may contribute to myocardial recovery. However, the mechanisms that regulate migration of MSC to the site of tissue damage remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate in vitro that activated platelets substantially inhibit recruitment of MSC toward apoptotic cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts. The alarmin high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) was released by platelets upon activation and mediated inhibition of the cell death-dependent migratory response through Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 expressed on the MSC. Migration of MSC to apoptotic cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts was driven by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and platelet activation was followed by HMGB1/TLR-4-dependent down-regulation of HGF receptor MET on MSC, thereby impairing HGF-driven MSC recruitment. We identify a novel mechanism by which platelets, upon activation, interfere with MSC recruitment to apoptotic cardiac cells, a process that may be of particular relevance for myocardial repair and regeneration.
    Keywords: Cardiac Repair and Regeneration ; Cell Migration ; Hmgb1 ; Mesenchymal Stem Cells ; Myocardial Infarction ; Platelets ; Toll-Like Receptors (Tlr) ; Apoptosis -- Physiology ; Blood Platelets -- Metabolism ; Cell Movement -- Physiology ; Down-Regulation -- Physiology ; Fibroblasts -- Metabolism ; Hmgb1 Protein -- Metabolism ; Mesenchymal Stem Cells -- Metabolism ; Myocytes, Cardiac -- Metabolism ; Platelet Activation -- Physiology ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins C-Met -- Biosynthesis ; Toll-Like Receptor 4 -- Metabolism
    E-ISSN: 1083-351X
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