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  • Chen, Shaoqing  (10)
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Ecological Modelling, Feb 10, 2013, Vol.250, p.25(9)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2012.10.015 Byline: Shaoqing Chen (a), Bin Chen (a), Brian D. Fath (b)(c) Keywords: Ecological risk assessment; System-based model; Ecosystem evaluation; Environmental management Abstract: a* State-of-the-art of system-based models for ecological risk assessment (ERA) were reviewed. a* The ERA models were compared on various aspects and mapped into different levels. a* The possibility and usefulness of model integration were discussed in a regulatory context. a* An integrated framework was developed to streamline ERA from the system's perspective. Author Affiliation: (a) School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China (b) Department of Biological Sciences, Towson University, Towson, MD 21252, USA (c) Advanced Systems Analysis, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, Austria Article History: Received 9 February 2012; Revised 12 October 2012; Accepted 16 October 2012
    Keywords: Risk Assessment -- Models ; Ecosystems -- Models
    ISSN: 0304-3800
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Pollution, July, 2014, Vol.190, p.139(11)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2014.03.032 Byline: Shaoqing Chen, Bin Chen, Brian D. Fath Abstract: Urbanization is a strong and extensive driver that causes environmental pollution and climate change from local to global scale. Modeling cities as ecosystems has been initiated by a wide range of scientists as a key to addressing challenging problems concomitant with urbanization. In this paper, 'urban ecosystem modeling (UEM)' is defined in an inter-disciplinary context to acquire a broad perception of urban ecological properties and their interactions with global change. Furthermore, state-of-the-art models of urban ecosystems are reviewed, categorized as top-down models (including materials/energy-oriented models and structure-oriented models), bottom-up models (including land use-oriented models and infrastructure-oriented models), or hybrid models thereof. Based on the review of UEM studies, a future framework for explicit UEM is proposed based the integration of UEM approaches of different scales, guiding more rational urban management and efficient emissions mitigation. Author Affiliation: (a) State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China (b) Department of Biological Sciences, Towson University, Towson, MD 21252, USA (c) Advanced Systems Analysis, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, Austria Article History: Received 7 January 2014; Revised 24 March 2014; Accepted 25 March 2014
    Keywords: Pollution Control -- Models ; Global Temperature Changes -- Models ; Urbanization -- Models ; Ecosystems -- Models
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Ecological Modelling, 10 February 2013, Vol.250, pp.25-33
    Description: ► State-of-the-art of system-based models for ecological risk assessment (ERA) were reviewed. ► The ERA models were compared on various aspects and mapped into different levels. ► The possibility and usefulness of model integration were discussed in a regulatory context. ► An integrated framework was developed to streamline ERA from the system's perspective. This paper reviews state-of-the-art models developed for ecological risk assessment and presents a system-oriented perspective for holistic risk evaluation and management. Ecological risk assessment (ERA), which is aimed at appraising a wide range of undesirable impacts on ecosystems exposed to a possible eco-environmental hazard, has been highly recommended for environmental decision-making. The existing system-based eco-risk models at different levels of hierarchical organization are reviewed, including food web-based models, ecosystem-based models and socio-ecological models are reviewed. Based on this inspection, an integrated framework characterizing problem formulation, risk characterization and risk assessment is depicted to illumine future ecological risk assessments. The possibility of integrating the various ERA modeling systems is addressed through examining the interconnections between models shown within the context of our diagrams. Furthermore, some refinements of the current system-level techniques are proposed to meet the requirements of risk evaluation in a holistic and regulatory context. We conclude that assessing ecological risk by using system-based models at different levels of organization in a combined way is an evolutionary step for the application of risk evaluation in environmental management.
    Keywords: Ecological Risk Assessment ; System-Based Model ; Ecosystem Evaluation ; Environmental Management ; Environmental Sciences ; Ecology
    ISSN: 0304-3800
    E-ISSN: 1872-7026
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Pollution, July 2014, Vol.190, pp.139-149
    Description: Urbanization is a strong and extensive driver that causes environmental pollution and climate change from local to global scale. Modeling cities as ecosystems has been initiated by a wide range of scientists as a key to addressing challenging problems concomitant with urbanization. In this paper, ‘urban ecosystem modeling (UEM)’ is defined in an inter-disciplinary context to acquire a broad perception of urban ecological properties and their interactions with global change. Furthermore, state-of-the-art models of urban ecosystems are reviewed, categorized as top-down models (including materials/energy-oriented models and structure-oriented models), bottom-up models (including land use-oriented models and infrastructure-oriented models), or hybrid models thereof. Based on the review of UEM studies, a future framework for explicit UEM is proposed based the integration of UEM approaches of different scales, guiding more rational urban management and efficient emissions mitigation. State-of-the-art models of urban ecosystem modeling (UEM) are reviewed for rational urban management and emissions mitigation.
    Keywords: Urban Ecosystem Modeling ; Urbanization ; Global Change ; Emissions Mitigation ; Engineering ; Environmental Sciences ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    E-ISSN: 1873-6424
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Ecological Indicators, 2011, Vol.11(6), pp.1664-1672
    Description: Ecological risk assessment, aiming at evaluating a wide range of undesirable consequences initiated by a possible eco-environmental hazard, has been the center of concern for ecosystem management in recent years. However, when it comes to disturbed natural ecosystems, most models developed for ecological risk assessment are restricted to instant cause–effect computation of single factors and often ignore the indirect effects, therefore fail to implement a holistic assessment at an ecosystem scale when interactions of different risk receptors are obvious. In this study, we developed a risk-based network model based on a new control analysis termed control allocation and a conceptual conversion of flow currency in NEA. By taking a river ecosystem intercepted by dam construction as an example, risk propagation between all functional guilds of the ecosystem concerning both direct risk and integral risk dynamic were quantified and illustrated in the network model. The results of this new risk assessment showed that there were significant differences between network integral risk and input risk, and although the phytoplankton received the instantaneous impact of chromium pollution among all the functional guilds, it was the piscivorous fish which obtain the greatest overall risk threat. On the basis of the model results, we proposed the network-based indicators for assessing the system-wide risk condition and component-specific risk scenarios of disturbed ecosystems exposed to single or multiple stressors. This study could provide a novel perspective and methodology for assessing ecological risk at the system scale, and concurrently, serve as an elicitation of how we can effectively evaluate ecosystems on the same analytic basis of information-based networks.
    Keywords: Ecological Risk Assessment ; Network Environ Analysis ; Control Analysis ; Environmental Flow Disturbance ; Dam Construction ; Environmental Sciences
    ISSN: 1470-160X
    E-ISSN: 1872-7034
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Procedia Environmental Sciences, 2010, Vol.2, pp.720-724
    Description: The system analysis of urban metabolic system, still a black box in urban research, has been underlined recently due to its important role in assessing the sustainability of urban ecosystem. An interpretation of the information indices from ecological network analysis when combined with urban metabolic research, however, has not been addressed systematically. In this study, a conceptual network model of urban metabolic systems was developed based on the identification of seven compartments. Emergy analysis and extended exergy analysis were introduced in order to define the proper way of quantifying the material and energy flows within the system. After that, the information indices derived from ecological network analysis such as developmental capacity, ascendancy, overload were proposed as the potential indicators reflecting the sustainability of urban development. An interpretation of these information indices when embedded into urban metabolic system was conducted to further demonstrate their potential application to urban research. With the qualification and interpretation of these information indices from network analysis, this study may provide some lights on unfolding the black box.
    Keywords: Urban Metabolism ; Ecological Network Analysis ; Ascendancy ; Overhead ; Environmental Sciences
    ISSN: 1878-0296
    E-ISSN: 1878-0296
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Procedia Environmental Sciences, 2010, Vol.2, pp.725-728
    Description: Dam construction is regarded as one of the major factors contributing to significant modifications of the river ecosystems, and the ecological risk (ER) assessment of dam construction has received growing attention in recent years. In the present study, we explored the potential ecological risk caused by dam project based on the general principles of the ecological risk assessment. Ecological network analysis was proposed as the usable analytic method for the implement of ecological risk assessment, thus contributing to the modelling of dam-induced risk process. Applying ecological network analysis to the ecological risk assessment of river ecosystems after dam construction, this study may provide important insights into the understanding of how an affected river ecosystem reacts to the artificial perturbation on a whole-ecosystem scale.
    Keywords: Ecological Network Analysis ; Ecological Risk ; Dam Project ; Environmental Sciences
    ISSN: 1878-0296
    E-ISSN: 1878-0296
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2015, Vol.42, p.78(15)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2014.10.017 Byline: Shaoqing Chen, Bin Chen, Brian D. Fath Abstract: Hydropower is the major renewable energy source for many nations and regions. Dam construction caused direct or indirect detrimental impacts on river systems by altering the water flow pattern and reshaping natural habitats. The dam-induced environmental impact assessment is critical in balancing the human demand for more accessible energy and the ecosystem conservation. In this paper, we proposed information network analysis for assessing environmental impact of hydropower construction based on energy network model of the river system. The framework is capable of evaluating multiple post-dam environmental stressors and tracking energy flows within the disturbed river system. By considering both direct and indirect interactions between system components in the network model, the environmental impacts of sedimentation, discharge change and heavy metal pollution are explicitly evaluated. Dam construction on the upper Mekong River was presented as a case study. The results suggested that the initial dam-induced impact only contributed less than 30% of the cumulative value and that the impact ranking among species, from a network perspective, significantly differed from the traditional toxicological/physiological estimation. Mollusca, benthic-feeding fish and zooplanktivorous fish in the middle trophic levels were most affected by damming, whereas the impact on species at the bottom of the food chain became less prominent in a cumulative way. The most valued species in fishery were found notably impacted and might become endangered because of dam construction. Ad-hoc management actions should be taken to enhance ecosystem conservation and sustainable hydroelectric development in China. By introducing the network approach to the cumulative environmental impact assessment, this study provided insights into a more sustainable path of hydropower construction. Author Affiliation: (a) State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China (b) Department of Biological Sciences, Towson University, Towson, MD 21252, USA (c) Advanced Systems Analysis Program, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, Austria Article History: Received 23 May 2014; Revised 20 July 2014; Accepted 5 October 2014
    Keywords: Hydroelectric Power – Case Studies ; Hydroelectric Power – Models ; Electric Power Plant Construction – Case Studies ; Electric Power Plant Construction – Models ; Pollution Control – Case Studies ; Pollution Control – Models ; Hydraulic Flow – Case Studies ; Hydraulic Flow – Models ; Dam Construction – Case Studies ; Dam Construction – Models ; Hydroelectric Construction – Case Studies ; Hydroelectric Construction – Models ; Environmental Impact Analysis – Case Studies ; Environmental Impact Analysis – Models ; Ecosystems – Case Studies ; Ecosystems – Models
    ISSN: 1364-0321
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, February 2015, Vol.42, pp.78-92
    Description: Hydropower is the major renewable energy source for many nations and regions. Dam construction caused direct or indirect detrimental impacts on river systems by altering the water flow pattern and reshaping natural habitats. The dam-induced environmental impact assessment is critical in balancing the human demand for more accessible energy and the ecosystem conservation. In this paper, we proposed information network analysis for assessing environmental impact of hydropower construction based on energy network model of the river system. The framework is capable of evaluating multiple post-dam environmental stressors and tracking energy flows within the disturbed river system. By considering both direct and indirect interactions between system components in the network model, the environmental impacts of sedimentation, discharge change and heavy metal pollution are explicitly evaluated. Dam construction on the upper Mekong River was presented as a case study. The results suggested that the initial dam-induced impact only contributed less than 30% of the cumulative value and that the impact ranking among species, from a network perspective, significantly differed from the traditional toxicological/physiological estimation. Mollusca, benthic-feeding fish and zooplanktivorous fish in the middle trophic levels were most affected by damming, whereas the impact on species at the bottom of the food chain became less prominent in a cumulative way. The most valued species in fishery were found notably impacted and might become endangered because of dam construction. Ad-hoc management actions should be taken to enhance ecosystem conservation and sustainable hydroelectric development in China. By introducing the network approach to the cumulative environmental impact assessment, this study provided insights into a more sustainable path of hydropower construction.
    Keywords: Hydropower Construction ; Sustainable Energy Development ; Environmental Impact Assessment ; Energy Network Model ; Engineering
    ISSN: 1364-0321
    E-ISSN: 1879-0690
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  • 10
    In: Earth's Future, February 2019, Vol.7(2), pp.197-209
    Description: Cities are increasingly linked to domestic and foreign markets during rapid globalization of trade. While transboundary carbon footprints of cities have been recently highlighted, we still have limited understanding of how carbon emission linkages between sectors are reshaping urban carbon footprints through time. In this study, we propose an integrated input‐output approach to trace the dynamics of various types of carbon emission linkages associated with a city. This approach quantifies full linkages in the urban carbon system from both production‐ and consumption‐based perspectives. We assess the dynamic roles that economic sectors and activities play in manipulating multiscale linkages induced by local, domestic, and international inputs. Using Beijing as a case study, we find that imports from domestic and foreign markets have an increasing impact on the city's carbon footprint with more distant linkages during the period from 1990 to 2012. The manufacturing‐related carbon emission linkages have been increasingly transferred outside the urban boundary since 2005, while the linkages from the energy sector to services sectors remain important in Beijing's local economy. Applying systems thinking to input‐output linkage analysis provides important details on when and how carbon emission linkages evolved in cities, whereby sector‐oriented and activity‐oriented carbon mitigation policies can be formulated. Cities are increasingly linked to domestic and foreign markets during rapid globalization of trade. In this study, we propose an integrated approach to answer the question: what drives the carbon emissions from urban activities? We assess the dynamic roles that economic sectors and activities play in manipulating carbon flows related to local, domestic, and international inputs. Using Beijing as a case study, we find that imports from domestic and foreign markets have an increasing impact on the city's carbon flows from 1990 to 2012. The manufacture‐related carbon emission has been increasingly transferred outside the urban boundary since 2005, and the connection of energy sector with services sectors remains important in Beijing's local economy. This study provides important details on when and how carbon emission alters in cities, whereby informed carbon mitigation policies can be formulated. New indices are proposed to quantify the dynamic carbon emission linkages for a city Manufacturing‐related carbon emission linkages have been increasingly transferred outside the city of Beijing since 2005 Carbon emission linkages from the energy sector to services sectors remain important in Beijing's local economy during urbanization
    Keywords: Carbon Emission Linkages ; Input‐Output Analysis ; Dynamic Linkage Analysis ; Urban Decarbonization
    ISSN: 2328-4277
    E-ISSN: 2328-4277
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