Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • Doerr, Hw  (26)
Type of Medium
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Current Molecular Medicine, March 2009, Vol.9(2), pp.131-151
    Description: Highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus can infect humans and is currently the most deadly influenza virus that has crossed the species barrier. As of December 2007, the spread of H5N1 virus from human to human has been rare. Nobody can predict if H5N1 may cause a pandemic. However, the number of human cases is continuously increasing and changes in virulence and epidemiology have been detected. There are specific pathogenic features of H5N1 infection. In contrast to human-adapted influenza A strains, H5N1 preferentially infects cells of the lower respiratory tract and may spread to tissues outside the respiratory tract in humans. Moreover, H5N1 replication is prolonged in target organs and results in higher viral loads and increased tissue damage. These features will have to be considered for therapeutic protocols for H5N1 infection in humans. Rapid genetic and antigenic changes observed in H5N1 virus isolates represent a challenge for the development of vaccines. In the present review, current knowledge about epidemiology, virulence factors and pathology of H5N1 infections in humans are summarised and discussed. Moreover, the possible roles of antiinfluenza drugs in the pandemic situation as well as the development of effective vaccines are subject of this overview.
    Keywords: Pathogenic H5n1 ; Avian Influenza ; Humans ; Of Chickens ; Epidemiology ; Epidemiology
    ISSN: 1566-5240
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Medical Microbiology and Immunology, 2007, Vol.196(4), pp.213-225
    Description: Among emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, influenza constitutes one of the major threats to mankind. In this review series epidemiologic, virologic and pathologic concerns raised by infections of humans with avian influenza virus A/H5N1 are discussed. This fourth part focuses on vaccine development. Several phase I clinical studies with vaccines against H5 viruses have demonstrated limited efficacy compared to seasonal influenza vaccines. To induce protective immunity two immunisations with increased amounts of H5N1 vaccine were required. Novel vaccination strategies that are egg- and adjuvant-independent, broadly cross-reactive and long-lasting are highly desirable.
    Keywords: Vaccines ; Avian Influenza;
    ISSN: 0300-8584
    E-ISSN: 1432-1831
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 09/2000, Vol.182(3), pp.643-651
    Description: In fibroblasts, infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) inhibits expression of the extracellular matrix proteins thrombospondin-1 and -2 (TSP-1 and TSP-2). These effects may depend on expression of HCMV immediate-early (IE) genes, which are activated by cellular transcription factor NF-kappaB. The influence of HCMV infection on TSP-1 and TSP-2 expression and the ability of different antiviral drugs to prevent these cellular changes in permissive cultures of human retinal glial cells were observed. Ganciclovir inhibited only HCMV late antigen (LA) expression, whereas antisense oligonucleotide ISIS 2922 and peptide SN50, inhibitors of HCMV IE expression and NF-kappaB activity, respectively, inhibited both IE and LA expression. ISIS 2922 and SN50, but not ganciclovir, prevented down-modulation of TSP-1 and TSP-2. The results showed that HCMV-induced down-modulation of TSP-1 and TSP-2 in retinal glial cells is prevented by inhibition of HCMV IE expression. These findings may be relevant to pathogenesis and treatment of HCMV retinitis.
    Keywords: Antiviral Agents -- Pharmacology ; Cytomegalovirus Retinitis -- Metabolism ; Neuroglia -- Metabolism ; Retina -- Metabolism ; Thrombospondin 1 -- Biosynthesis ; Thrombospondins -- Biosynthesis;
    ISSN: 0022-1899
    E-ISSN: 1537-6613
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Article
    Article
    In: Current Pharmaceutical Design, November 2007, Vol.13(33), pp.3378-3393
    Description: The short chain fatty acid valproic acid (VPA, 2-propylpetanoic acid) is approved for the treatment of epilepsia, bipolar disorders and migraine and clinically used for schizophrenia. In 1999, the first clinical anti-cancer trial using VPA was initiated. Currently, VPA is examined in numerous clinical trials for different leukaemias and solid tumour entities. In addition to clinical assessment, the experimental examination of VPA as anti-cancer drug is ongoing and many questions remain unanswered. Although other mechanisms may also contribute to VPA-induced anti-cancer effects, inhibition of histone deacetylases appears to play a central role. This review focuses on recent developments regarding the anti-cancer activity of VPA.
    Keywords: Hdac ; Differentiation ; Combination Therapy ; Clinical Studies ; Valproic Acid ; Angiogenesis
    ISSN: 1381-6128
    E-ISSN: 18734286
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Phytomedicine: International Journal of Phytotherapy & Phytopharmacology, March 15, 2011, Vol.18(5), p.384(3)
    Description: The Pelargonium sidoides extract EPs[super][registered] 7630 is an approved drug for the treatment of acute bronchitis in Germany. The postulated mechanisms underlying beneficial effects of EPs[super][registered] 7630 in bronchitis patients include immunomodulatory and cytoprotective effects, inhibition of interaction between bacteria and host cells, and increase of cilliary beat frequency on respiratory cells. Here, we investigated the influence of EPs[super][registered] 7630 on replication of a panel of respiratory viruses. Determination of virus-induced cytopathogenic effects and virus titres revealed that EPs[super][registered] 7630 at concentrations up to 100 [micro]g/ml interfered with replication of seasonal influenza A virus strains (H1N1, H3N2), respiratory syncytial virus, human coronavirus, parainfluenza virus, and coxsackie virus but did not affect replication of highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus (H5N1), adenovirus, or rhinovirus. Therefore, antiviral effects may contribute to the beneficial effects exerted by EPs[super][registered] 7630 in acute bronchitis patients.
    Keywords: Influenza -- Drug Therapy ; Influenza -- Research ; Virus Replication -- Research ; Herbal Medicine -- Health Aspects ; Herbal Medicine -- Research ; Geraniums -- Health Aspects ; Geraniums -- Research
    ISSN: 0944-7113
    E-ISSN: 1618095X
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Intervirology, 1996, Vol.39(4), pp.259-269
    Description: Although there is no definitive evidence of the association of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection with human cancers, the oncogenic potential of HCMV has been well established by in vitro studies demonstrating the ability of UV-irradiated or infectious virus to transform a variety of cells. After prolonged passaging the transformed cell type was maintained while HCMV DNA sequences were no more detectable. Three morphological transforming regions (mtr) of HCMV have been identified. The effects of HCMV on cellular functions which may be associated with the malignant phenotype include the expression of oncogenes and transcriptional activation of growth factors and interleukin synthesis. In infected cells, HCMV induces cytoskeletal alterations and changes in expression of cell surface receptors for extracellular matrix proteins which could result in increased motility and dissemination of cancer cells. Several human neuroblastoma cell lines undergo maturation in different neural crest derived cell types upon treatment with oncogenic potential agents, i. e. retinoic acid. The persistent HCMV infection of neuroblastoma cells (〉1 year) is accompanied by the increased expression of oncoproteins (i.e. N-myc) and decreased expression of tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine-β-hydroxylase. The activation of the cellular metabolism is due to HCMV binding to cellular receptors (prior to virus gene expression) and to the activity of HCMV immediate early (IE) gene products. IE proteins act directly as transcriptional activators or their activity is mediated by a variety of cellular transcription factors. HCMV infection may result in activation of promoters of cellular genes coding for cytokines, replication enzymes, protooncogenes and viral promoters. Recently it has been demonstrated that HCMV IE proteins block apoptosis probably by suppressing the ability of the antioncogene p53 to activate a reporter gene. The interactions of HCMV with tumor suppressor proteins such as p53 or retinoblastoma (pRb) susceptibility protein are reminiscent of those mediated by the oncoproteins of DNA tumor viruses. The acquisition of a fully malignant phenotype by normal cells is thought to require several mutations in a number of cellular genes. In this connection, HCMV may play the role of a nonobligate either direct or indirect cofactor for tumor genesis, e.g. by blocking apoptosis, which may be an essential requirement for tumor progression. Due to the stimulation of growth factors and/or inhibition of antioncogenes by its gene products, HCMV may modulate the malignant potential of tumor cells.
    Keywords: Original Paper ; Cytomegalovirus, Human ; Neuroblastoma ; Oncogenic Potential ; Differentiation ; Biology
    ISSN: 0300-5526
    E-ISSN: 1423-0100
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Intervirology, 1994, Vol.37(6), pp.307-314
    Description: Effective therapy of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is mainly based on inhibition of reverse transcriptase by nucleoside analogues such as zidovudine (azidothymidine; AZT), didanosine, and zalcitabine. A major problem associated with long-term AZT therapy is the waning efficacy (‘clinical resistance’) over time. Clinical isolates of HIV-1 with reduced susceptibility to AZT can be recovered from HIV-infected individuals under prolonged treatment. However, the clinical importance of AZT resistance is uncertain. Other factors such as increased virus burden, increased virulence, and AZT toxicity could contribute, singly or in combination, to the loss of therapeutic benefit. Recent observations based on experimental models and clinical trials suggest that cellular mechanisms (‘cellular resistance’) may account for clinical resistance to antiviral agents. In vitro experiments demonstrated that in analogy to antitumoral therapy, the acquisition of multidrug resistance, i.e., resistance of cells to multiple, structurally unrelated chemotherapeutic agents, may play a role in the failure of long-term antiretroviral therapy. The ‘cellular resistance’ may contribute directly to the failure of antiviral therapy by the generation of sub therapeutic levels of antiviral compounds and/or their active forms. Indirectly, such subtherapeutic concentrations of active substances which permit limited replication of virus may represent a selective pressure for emergence and development of a resistant virus population. Hence it is of great importance to investigate the role of cellular factors in ‘clinical resistance’ to AZT and other anti-HIV agents. More detailed knowledge of cellular interactions and antiviral agents could help to improve or develop new strategies for antiviral therapy regimens.
    Keywords: Review Paper ; Cellular Thymidine Kinase ; Viral Resistance Mechanisms ; Reverse Transcriptase ; Multidrug Resistance ; Glycoprotein P ; Biology
    ISSN: 0300-5526
    E-ISSN: 1423-0100
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Molecular Cancer, 2009, Vol.8(1), pp.urn:issn:1476-4598
    Description: Background: Chemoresistance acquisition may influence cancer cell biology. Here, bioinformatics analysis of gene expression data was used to identify chemoresistance-associated changes in neuroblastoma biology. Results: Bioinformatics analysis of gene expression data revealed that expression of angiogenesis-associated...
    Keywords: Endothelial Growth-Factor ; In-Vivo ; Melanoma-Cells ; Tumor-Growth ; N-Myc ; Extracellular-Matrix ; Angiogenic Factors ; Cytokine Network ; Vegf Expression ; Blood-Vessels
    ISSN: 1476-4598
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, May 17, 2011, Vol.6(5), p.e19705
    Description: Glycyrrhizin is known to exert antiviral and anti-inflammatory effects. Here, the effects of an approved parenteral glycyrrhizin preparation (Stronger Neo-Minophafen C) were investigated on highly pathogenic influenza A H5N1 virus replication, H5N1-induced apoptosis, and H5N1-induced pro-inflammatory responses in lung epithelial (A549) cells. Therapeutic glycyrrhizin concentrations substantially inhibited H5N1-induced expression of the pro-inflammatory molecules CXCL10, interleukin 6, CCL2, and CCL5 (effective glycyrrhizin concentrations 25 to 50 [micro]g/ml) but interfered with H5N1 replication and H5N1-induced apoptosis to a lesser extent (effective glycyrrhizin concentrations 100 [micro]g/ml or higher). Glycyrrhizin also diminished monocyte migration towards supernatants of H5N1-infected A549 cells. The mechanism by which glycyrrhizin interferes with H5N1 replication and H5N1-induced pro-inflammatory gene expression includes inhibition of H5N1-induced formation of reactive oxygen species and (in turn) reduced activation of NF[kappa]B, JNK, and p38, redox-sensitive signalling events known to be relevant for influenza A virus replication. Therefore, glycyrrhizin may complement the arsenal of potential drugs for the treatment of H5N1 disease.
    Keywords: Antiviral Agents -- Health Aspects ; Virus Replication -- Health Aspects ; Avian Influenza Viruses -- Health Aspects ; Avian Influenza -- Health Aspects ; Genes -- Health Aspects ; Apoptosis -- Health Aspects ; Gene Expression -- Health Aspects
    ISSN: 1932-6203
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Medical microbiology and immunology, 2011, Vol.200(1), pp.1-5
    Description: The question whether human cytomegalovirus may affect cancer diseases has been discussed (very controversially) for decades. There are convinced believers and strict opponents of the idea that HCMV might be able to play a role in the course of cancer diseases. In parallel, the number of published reports on the topic is growing. Recently published and presented (Ranganathan P, Clark P, Kuo JS, Salamat S, Kalejta RF. A Survey of Human Cytomegalovirus Genomic Loci Present in Glioblastoma Multiforme Tissue Samples. 35th Annual International Herpes Workshop, Salt Lake City, 2010) data on HCMV detection in glioblastoma tissues and colocalisation of HCMV proteins with cellular proteins known to be relevant for glioblastoma progression motivated us to recapitulate the current state of evidence. ; Includes references ; p. 1-5.
    Keywords: Neoplasms ; Cytomegalovirus ; Glioblastoma ; Tumour Virus ; Neuroblastoma ; Oncomodulation
    ISSN: 0300-8584
    E-ISSN: 14321831
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages