Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • Ehlert, Katrin  (4)
Type of Medium
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Environmental science & technology, 07 October 2014, Vol.48(19), pp.11320-9
    Description: Elevated solution concentrations of As in anoxic natural systems are usually accompanied by microbially mediated As(V), Mn(III/IV), and Fe(III) reduction. The microbially mediated reductive dissolution of Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides mainly liberates sorbed As(V) which is subsequently reduced to As(III). Manganese oxides have been shown to rapidly oxidize As(III) and Fe(II) under oxic conditions, but their net effect on the microbially mediated reductive release of As and Fe is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the microbial reduction of As(V)-bearing ferrihydrite (molar As/Fe: 0.05; Fe tot: 32.1 mM) by Shewanella sp. ANA-3 (10(8) cells/mL) in the presence of different concentrations of birnessite (Mn tot: 0, 0.9, 3.1 mM) at circumneutral pH over 397 h using wet-chemical analyses and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Additional abiotic experiments were performed to explore the reactivity of birnessite toward As(III) and Fe(II) in the presence of Mn(II), Fe(II), ferrihydrite, or deactivated bacterial cells. Compared to the birnessite-free control, the highest birnessite concentration resulted in 78% less Fe and 47% less As reduction at the end of the biotic experiment. The abiotic oxidation of As(III) by birnessite (k initial = 0.68 ± 0.31/h) was inhibited by Mn(II) and ferrihydrite, and lowered by Fe(II) and bacterial cell material. In contrast, the oxidation of Fe(II) by birnessite proceeded equally fast under all conditions (k initial = 493 ± 2/h) and was significantly faster than the oxidation of As(III). We conclude that in the presence of birnessite, microbially produced Fe(II) is rapidly reoxidized and precipitates as As-sequestering ferrihydrite. Our findings imply that the ability of Mn-oxides to oxidize As(III) in water-logged soils and sediments is limited by the formation of ferrihydrite and surface passivation processes.
    Keywords: Arsenic -- Chemistry ; Ferric Compounds -- Chemistry ; Iron -- Chemistry ; Oxides -- Chemistry ; Shewanella -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 0013936X
    E-ISSN: 1520-5851
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Science and Technology, 06 September 2016, Vol.50(17)
    Description: Reductive release of the potentially toxic metalloid As from Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides has been identified as an important process leading to elevated As porewater concentrations in soils and sediments. Despite the ubiquitous presence of Mn oxides in soils and their oxidizing power toward As(III), their impact on interrelated As, Fe, and Mn speciation under microbially reducing conditions remains largely unknown. For this reason, we employed a column setup and X-ray absorption spectroscopy to investigate the influence of increasing birnessite concentrations (molar soil Fe-to-Mn ratios: 4.8, 10.2, and 24.7) on As speciation and release from an As-contaminated floodplain soil (214 mg As/kg) under anoxic conditions. Our results show that birnessite additions significantly decreased As leaching. The reduction of both As and Fe was delayed, and As(III) accumulated in birnessite-rich column parts, indicating the passivation of birnessite and its transformation products toward As(III) oxidation and the precipitation of Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides. Microbial Mn reduction resulted in elevated soil pH values, which in turn lowered the microbial activity in the birnessite-enriched soil. We conclude that in Mn-oxide-rich soil environments undergoing redox fluctuations, the enhanced As adsorption to newly formed Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides under reducing conditions leads to a transient stabilization of As.
    Keywords: Engineering ; Environmental Sciences
    ISSN: 0013-936X
    E-ISSN: 1520-5851
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Science and Technology, 02 January 2018, Vol.52(2)
    Description: X-ray amorphous Fe(III)-As(V) coprecipitates are common initial products of oxidative As- and Fe-bearing sulfide weathering, and often control As solubility in mine wastes or mining-impacted soils. The formation conditions of these solids may exert a major control on their mineralogical composition and, hence, As release in the gastric tract of humans after incidental ingestion of As-contaminated soil. Here, we synthesized a set of 35 Fe(III)-As(V) coprecipitates as a function of pH (1.5-8) and initial molar Fe/As ratio (0.8-8.0). The solids were characterized by synchrotron X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy, and electrophoretic mobility measurements, and their As bioaccessibility (BAAs) was evaluated using the gastric-phase Solubility/Bioavailability Research Consortium in vitro assay (SBRC-G). The coprecipitates contained 1.01-4.51 mol/kg As (molar Fe/Assolid: 1.00-8.29) and comprised varying proportions of X-ray amorphous hydrous ferric arsenates (HFAam) and As(V)-adsorbed ferrihydrite. HFAam was detected up to pH 6 and its fraction decreased with increasing pH and molar Fe/As ratio. Bioaccessible As ranged from 2.9 to 7.3% of total As (x¯ = 4.8%). The BAAs of coprecipitates formed at pH = 4 was highest at formation pH 3 and 4 and controlled by the intrinsically high solubility of the HFAam component, possibly enhanced by sorbed sulfate. In contrast, the BAAs of coprecipitates dominated by As(V)-adsorbed ferrihydrite was much lower and controlled by As readsorption and/or surface precipitation in the gastric fluid. Bioaccessible As increased up to 95% with increasing liquid-to-solid ratio, indicating an enhanced solubility of these solids due to interactions between Fe and the glycine buffer. We conclude (i) that natural Fe(III)-As(V) coprecipitates exhibit a particularly high solubility in the human gastric tract when formed at pH ∼ 3-4 in the presence of sulfate, and (ii) that the in vitro bioaccessibility of As in Fe(III)-As(V) coprecipitates as assessed by tbe SBRC-G assay depends critically on their solid-phase concentration in As-contaminated soil and mine-waste materials.
    Keywords: Engineering ; Environmental Sciences
    ISSN: 0013-936X
    E-ISSN: 1520-5851
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages