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  • Feckler, Alexander  (20)
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management, January 2013, Vol.9(1), pp.172-173
    Description: Byline: Alexander Feckler, Ralf Schulz, Mirco Bundschuh ***** No abstract is available for this article. ***** Author Affiliation: Institute for Environmental Sciences, University of Koblenz-Landau, Landau, Germany Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden Institute for Environmental Sciences, University of Koblenz-Landau, Landau, Germany
    Keywords: Environmental Sciences;
    ISSN: 1551-3777
    E-ISSN: 1551-3793
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Science Of The Total Environment, 2012, Vol.439, pp.158-164
    Description: Lineages that are at least superficially morphologically identical but genetically distinct are usually misclassified as a single nominal species and, hence, belong to a cryptic species complex, as for example observed for Gammarus fossarum. Since genetic differentiation between cryptic lineages of the...
    Keywords: Other Biological Topics ; Annan Biologi
    ISSN: 0048-9697
    E-ISSN: 18791026
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Science of the Total Environment, 15 November 2016, Vol.571, pp.992-1000
    Description: Shredders play a central role in the breakdown of leaf material in aquatic systems. These organisms and the ecological function they provide may, however, be affected by chemical stressors either as a consequence of direct waterborne exposure or through alterations in food-quality (indirect pathway). To unravel the biological relevance of these effect pathways, we applied a 2 × 2-factorial test design. Leaf material was microbially colonized for 10 days in absence or presence of the fungicide epoxiconazole (15 μg/L) and subsequently fed to the shredder under exposure to epoxiconazole (15 μg/L) or in fungicide-free medium over a 28-day period ( = 40). Both effect pathways caused alterations in asselids' food processing, physiological fitness, and growth, although not always statistically significantly: assimilation either increased or remained at a similar level relative to the control suggesting compensatory behavior of to cope with the enhanced energy demand for detoxification processes and decreased nutritional quality of the food. The latter was driven by lowered microbial biomasses and the altered composition of fatty acids associated with the leaf material. Even with increased assimilation, direct and indirect effects caused decreases in the growth and lipid (fatty acid) content of with relative effect sizes between 10 and 40%. Moreover, the concentrations of two essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (i.e., arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid) were non-significantly reduced (up to ~ 15%) in asselids. This effect was, however, independent of the exposure pathway. Although waterborne effects were generally stronger than the diet-related effects, results suggest impaired functioning of via both effect pathways.
    Keywords: Asellus Aquaticus ; Biofilm ; Fatty Acid Composition ; Food Quality ; Leaf Litter Breakdown ; Shredder ; Environmental Sciences ; Biology ; Public Health
    ISSN: 0048-9697
    E-ISSN: 1879-1026
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  • 4
    In: Journal of Applied Ecology, August 2014, Vol.51(4), pp.958-967
    Description: Molecular genetic methods continuously uncover cryptic lineages harboured by various species. However, from an applied perspective, it remains unclear whether and to which extent such a genetic diversity affects biological traits (e.g. ecological, behavioural and physiological characteristics) and environmental management. We assessed potential deviations regarding the trait ‘environmental stress tolerance’ using individuals from five field populations of each of two cryptic lineages (called A and B) comprised under the nominal species Gammarus fossarum. We used ammonia as a chemical stressor while assessing the feeding rate on leaf discs as a measure of sublethal response. In this context, we established a restriction fragment length polymorphism assay to allow a rapid identification of the lineages. We observed a biologically meaningful and statistically significant twofold higher overall tolerance of one cryptic lineage, lineage B, over the other. Confounding factors that may have the potential to influence the test results, such as life stage, sex, season of collection, parasitism, physiological status of organisms and upstream land‐use patterns of the river catchments, were either controlled for or displayed only minor deviations between lineages. Synthesis and applications. The trait differences observed in the present study seem to be mainly explained by the considerable genetic differentiation between cryptic lineages of one nominal species. Although traits other than tolerance have been minimally investigated in this context, this study indicates implications in the reliability and quality of environmental monitoring and management if cryptic lineage complexes are ignored. The trait differences observed in the present study seem to be mainly explained by the considerable genetic differentiation between cryptic lineages of one nominal species. Although traits other than tolerance have been minimally investigated in this context, this study indicates implications in the reliability and quality of environmental monitoring and management if cryptic lineage complexes are ignored.
    Keywords: Environmental Management ; Gammarus ; Genetic Differentiation ; Leaf Litter Breakdown ; Nominal Species ; Rflp ; Sensitivity
    ISSN: 0021-8901
    E-ISSN: 1365-2664
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Pollution, January 2015, Vol.196, pp.276-283
    Description: Interactions with environmental parameters may alter the ecotoxicity of nanoparticles. The present study therefore assessed the (in)direct effects of nanoparticulate titanium dioxide (nano-TiO ) towards , considering nano-TiO 's photocatalytic properties at ambient UV-intensities. Gammarids' habitat selection was investigated using its feeding preference on leaf discs either exposed to or protected from UV-irradiation in presence of nano-TiO as proxy (  = 49). UV-irradiation alone induced a significant preference for UV-protected habitats, which was more pronounced in simultaneous presence of nano-TiO . This behaviour may be mainly explained by the UV-induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by nano-TiO . Besides their direct toxicity, ROS may have lowered the leaf-quality in UV-exposed areas contributing (approximately 30%) to the observed behavioural pattern. Since the predicted no effect concentration of nano-TiO in combination with UV-irradiation falls below the predicted environmental concentration this study underpins the importance of considering environmental parameters during the risk assessment of nanoparticles. Results revealed for the first time a PNEC of nano-TiO falling below the PEC indicating a substantial risk for aquatic ecosystems already nowadays.
    Keywords: Gammarus ; Uv-Irradiation ; Interaction Effect ; Reactive Oxygen Species ; Behavioural Response ; Engineering ; Environmental Sciences ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    E-ISSN: 1873-6424
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Pollution, Jan, 2015, Vol.196, p.276(8)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2014.09.022 Byline: Alexander Feckler, Ricki R. Rosenfeldt, Frank Seitz, Ralf Schulz, Mirco Bundschuh Abstract: Interactions with environmental parameters may alter the ecotoxicity of nanoparticles. The present study therefore assessed the (in)direct effects of nanoparticulate titanium dioxide (nano-TiO.sub.2) towards Gammarus fossarum, considering nano-TiO.sub.2's photocatalytic properties at ambient UV-intensities. Gammarids' habitat selection was investigated using its feeding preference on leaf discs either exposed to or protected from UV-irradiation in presence of nano-TiO.sub.2 as proxy (n = 49). UV-irradiation alone induced a significant preference for UV-protected habitats, which was more pronounced in simultaneous presence of nano-TiO.sub.2. This behaviour may be mainly explained by the UV-induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by nano-TiO.sub.2. Besides their direct toxicity, ROS may have lowered the leaf-quality in UV-exposed areas contributing (approximately 30%) to the observed behavioural pattern. Since the predicted no effect concentration of nano-TiO.sub.2 in combination with UV-irradiation falls below the predicted environmental concentration this study underpins the importance of considering environmental parameters during the risk assessment of nanoparticles. Author Affiliation: (a) Institute for Environmental Sciences, University of Koblenz-Landau, Fortstrasse 7, 76829 Landau, Germany (b) Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Lennart Hjelms vag 9, 75007 Uppsala, Sweden Article History: Received 26 June 2014; Revised 16 September 2014; Accepted 22 September 2014
    Keywords: Nanoparticles -- Analysis ; Habitat Conservation -- Analysis ; Titanium Dioxide -- Analysis
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Science of the Total Environment, 10 December 2018, Vol.644, pp.342-349
    Description: The environmental risk assessment of pesticides is mainly performed on individual active ingredients. In surface waters within the agricultural landscape, however, contamination is usually characterized by complex pesticide mixtures. To estimate the joint effects caused by these complex mixtures, mathematical models have been proposed. Among these, the model of concentration addition (CA) is suggested as default model for the risk assessment of chemical mixtures as it is considered protective for mixtures composed of similar and dissimilar acting substances. Here we assessed the suitability of CA predictions for seven field relevant pesticide mixtures using acute (immobility) and chronic (reproduction) responses of the standard test species . Pesticide mixtures indicated largely additive or less than additive effects when using CA model predictions as a reference. Moreover, we revealed that deviations from CA predictions are lower for chronic (up to 3.2-fold) relative to acute (up to 7.2-fold) response variables. Additionally, CA predictions were in general more accurate for complex mixtures relative to those composed of only a few pesticides. Thus, this study suggests CA models as largely protective for the risk assessment of pesticide mixtures justifying its use as default model. At the same time, extrapolating conclusions about the joint effects of pesticides from acute to chronic responses is uncertain, due to partly large discrepancies with regards to the deviation of model prediction and observed effects between exposure scenarios.
    Keywords: Mixture Toxicity ; Pesticide ; Mode of Toxic Action ; Concentration Addition ; Daphnia ; Environmental Sciences ; Biology ; Public Health
    ISSN: 0048-9697
    E-ISSN: 1879-1026
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  • 8
    In: Journal of Applied Ecology, April 2015, Vol.52(2), pp.310-322
    Description: The application of fungicides is considered an indispensable measure to secure crop production. These substances, however, may unintentionally enter surface waters via run‐off, potentially affecting the microbial community. To assess such risks adequately, authorities recently called for suitable test designs involving relevant aquatic micro‐organisms. We assessed the structural and functional responses of leaf‐associated microbial communities, which play a key role in the breakdown of allochthonous leaf material in streams, towards the inorganic fungicides copper (Cu) and elemental sulphur (S). These substances are of particular interest as they are authorized for both conventional and organic farming in many countries of the world. We used the food choice of the amphipod shredder Gammarus fossarum (indicative for micro‐organism‐mediated leaf palatability) as well as microbial leaf decomposition as functional endpoints. Moreover, the leaf‐associated microbial communities were characterized by means of bacterial density, fungal biomass and community composition facilitating mechanistic understanding of the observed functional effects. While Gammarus preferred Cu‐exposed leaves over unexposed ones, microbial leaf decomposition was reduced by both Cu and S (up to 30%). Furthermore, Cu exposure decreased bacterial densities (up to 60%), stimulated the growth of leaf‐associated fungi (up to 100%) and altered fungal community composition, while S did not affect any of the assessed structural endpoints. Synthesis and applications. We observed both structural and functional changes in leaf‐associated microbial communities at inorganic fungicide concentrations realistic for surface water bodies influenced by conventional and organic farming. Our data hence justify a careful re‐evaluation of the environmental safety of the agricultural use of these compounds. Moreover, inclusion of an experimental design similar to the one used in this study in lower tier environmental risk assessments of antimicrobial compounds may aid to safeguard the integrity of aquatic microbial communities and the functions they provide. We observed both structural and functional changes in leaf‐associated microbial communities at inorganic fungicide concentrations realistic for surface water bodies influenced by conventional and organic farming. Our data hence justify a careful re‐evaluation of the environmental safety of the agricultural use of these compounds. Moreover, inclusion of an experimental design similar to the one used in this study in lower tier environmental risk assessments of antimicrobial compounds may aid to safeguard the integrity of aquatic microbial communities and the functions they provide.
    Keywords: Antagonistic Effect ; Antimicrobial ; Aquatic Hyphomycetes ; Bacteria ; Biofilm ; Ecosystem Functioning ; Environmental Risk Assessment ; Heavy Metal ; Leaf Litter Breakdown ; Mixture Toxicity
    ISSN: 0021-8901
    E-ISSN: 1365-2664
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 01 January 2017, Vol.12(4), p.e0174634
    Description: Traditional methods to identify aquatic hyphomycetes rely on the morphology of released conidia, which can lead to misidentifications or underestimates of species richness due to convergent morphological evolution and the presence of non-sporulating...
    Keywords: Sciences (General)
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 10
    In: Global Change Biology, February 2018, Vol.24(2), pp.e402-e415
    Description: Ecosystem functions in streams (e.g., microbially mediated leaf litter breakdown) are threatened globally by the predicted agricultural intensification and its expansion into pristine areas, which is associated with increasing use of fertilizers and pesticides. However, the ecological consequences may depend on the disturbance history of microbial communities. To test this, we assessed the effects of fungicides and nutrients (four levels each) on the structural and functional resilience of leaf‐associated microbial communities with differing disturbance histories (pristine vs. previously disturbed) in a 2 × 4 × 4‐factorial design (=6) over 21 days. Microbial leaf breakdown was assessed as a functional variable, whereas structural changes were characterized by the fungal community composition, species richness, biomass, and other factors. Leaf breakdown by the pristine microbial community was reduced by up to 30% upon fungicide exposure compared with controls, whereas the previously disturbed microbial community increased leaf breakdown by up to 85%. This significant difference in the functional response increased in magnitude with increasing nutrient concentrations. A pollution‐induced community tolerance in the previously disturbed microbial community, which was dominated by a few species with high breakdown efficacies, may explain the maintained function under stress. Hence, the global pressure on pristine ecosystems by agricultural expansion is expected to cause a modification in the structure and function of heterotrophic microbial communities, with microbially mediated leaf litter breakdown likely becoming more stable over time as a consequence of fungal community adaptions. Agricultural land use is projected to expand and intensify globally, with elevated chemical stress release to adjacent streams. We assessed if leaf‐associated microbial communities adapt to a combination of two agricultural stressors, namely fungicides and nutrients. Under fungicide stress, previously disturbed communities showed an even stimulated rate of leaf litter breakdown, while microbial communities from a pristine site were negatively affected. Nutrients induced positive effects on leaf litter breakdown, which was stronger for the previously disturbed community. These observations are likely explained by a dominance of tolerant and effective fungal decomposers that were able to maintain their biomass and sporulation.
    Keywords: Agricultural Intensification ; Aquatic Hyphomycetes ; Bacteria ; Biofilm ; Ecosystem Function ; Fungicides ; Land Use ; Nutrients
    ISSN: 1354-1013
    E-ISSN: 1365-2486
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