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  • Fleckenstein, Jan  (45)
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  • 1
    In: Fundamental and Applied Limnology / Archiv für Hydrobiologie, June 2014, Vol.184(3), pp.173-181
    Description: Heat is increasingly used as a natural tracer to quantify water fluxes at the groundwater-surface water-interface. We present a systematic approach to monitor and evaluate stream and streambed temperatures to derive daily-updated temperature-based water exchange fluxes between the stream and the streambed. Specifically designed multi-level temperature sensors coupled with a data logger and GSM modem are used to monitor temperature in the stream and streambed and transfer this data daily to a database. A suite of MATLAB scripts with structured query language (SQL) commands is applied to extract the data for processing using an inverse numerical model to estimate water flow based on the measured temperatures. Compared to common analytical approaches, which typically require sinusoidal diurnal temperature pattern, our numerical model can utilize temperature records without daily variations. Temperature-based calculations to quantify vertical water fluxes at the stream-groundwater interface can provide a supplement to, or even a replacement of, calculations based on vertical hydraulic gradients and Darcy' law.
    Keywords: Groundwater - Surface Water - Interface
    ISSN: 1863-9135
    E-ISSN: 23637110
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Hydrology, October 2015, Vol.529, pp.969-979
    Description: Coupling surface and subsurface water flow in fully integrated hydrological codes is becoming common in hydrological research; however, the coupling of surface–subsurface solute transport has received much less attention. Previous studies on fully integrated solute transport focus on small scales, simple geometric domains, and have not utilised many different field data sources. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the inclusion of both flow and solute transport in a 3D, fully integrated catchment model, utilising high resolution observations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export from a wetland complex during a rainfall event. A sensitivity analysis is performed to span a range of transport conditions for the surface–subsurface boundary (e.g. advective exchange only, advection plus diffusion, advection plus full mechanical dispersion) and subsurface dispersivities. The catchment model captures some aspects of observed catchment behaviour (e.g. solute discharge at the catchment outlet, increasing discharge from wetlands with increased stream discharge, and counter-clockwise concentration–discharge relationships), although other known behaviours are not well represented in the model (e.g. slope of concentration–discharge plots). Including surface–subsurface solute transport aids in evaluating internal model processes, however there are challenges related to the influence of dispersion across the surface–subsurface interface, and non-uniqueness of the solute transport solution. This highlights that obtaining solute field data is especially important for constraining integrated models of solute transport.
    Keywords: Solute Transport ; Surface–Subsurface Coupling ; Integrated Modelling ; Catchment Modelling ; Geography
    ISSN: 0022-1694
    E-ISSN: 1879-2707
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Hydrology, 19 December 2012, Vol.475, pp.1-11
    Description: ► We developed a method to determine flow direction and velocity in the hyporheic zone. ► The method is based on a heat pulse technique with analytical data analysis algorithm. ► Error-proneness and accuracy of the method were assessed in the lab and . ► The first field application gives insight in hyporheic flow patterns of a lowland river. The hyporheic zone is strongly influenced by the adjacent surface water and groundwater systems. It is subject to hydraulic head and pressure fluctuations at different space and time scales, causing dynamic and heterogeneous flow patterns. These patterns are crucial for many biogeochemical processes in the shallow sediment and need to be considered in investigations of this hydraulically dynamic and biogeochemical active interface. For this purpose a device employing heat as an artificial tracer and a data analysis routine were developed. The method aims at measuring hyporheic flow direction and velocity in three dimensions at a scale of a few centimeters. A short heat pulse is injected into the sediment by a point source and its propagation is detected by up to 24 temperature sensors arranged cylindrically around the heater. The resulting breakthrough curves are analyzed using an analytical solution of the heat transport equation. The device was tested in two laboratory flow-through tanks with defined flow velocities and directions. Using different flow situations and sensor arrays the sensitivity of the method was evaluated. After operational reliability was demonstrated in the laboratory, its applicability in the field was tested in the hyporheic zone of a low gradient stream with sandy streambed in NE-Germany. Median and maximum flow velocity in the hyporheic zone at the site were determined as 0.9 × 10 and 2.1 × 10 m s respectively. Horizontal flow components were found to be spatially very heterogeneous, while vertical flow component appear to be predominantly driven by the streambed morphology.
    Keywords: Flow Patterns ; Flow Direction ; Flow Velocity ; Hyporheic Zone ; Heat Pulse Technique ; Geography
    ISSN: 0022-1694
    E-ISSN: 1879-2707
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Hydrology, 13 February 2014, Vol.509, pp.601-614
    Description: An important prerequisite to better understand the transport of nutrients and contaminants across the river-aquifer interface and possible implications for biogeochemical transformations is to accurately characterize and asses the exchange fluxes. In this study we investigate how monsoonal precipitation events and the resulting variability in river discharge affect the dynamics of river-aquifer exchange and the corresponding flux rates. We evaluate potential impacts of the investigated exchange fluxes on local water quality. Hydraulic gradients along a piezometer transect were monitored at a river reach in a small catchment in South Korea, where the hydrologic dynamics are driven by the East-Asian Monsoon. We used heat as a tracer to constrain river-aquifer exchange fluxes in a two-dimensional flow and heat transport model implemented in the numerical code HydroGeoSphere, which was calibrated to the measured temperature and total head data. To elucidate potential effects of river-aquifer exchange dynamics on biogeochemical transformations at the river-aquifer interface, river water and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nitrate (NO ) and dissolved oxygen saturation (DO ). Our results illustrate highly variable hydrologic conditions during the monsoon season characterized by temporal and spatial variability in river-aquifer exchange fluxes with frequent flow reversals (changes between gaining and losing conditions). Intense monsoonal precipitation events and the associated rapid changes in river stage are the dominant driver for the observed riverbed flow reversals. The chemical data suggest that the flow reversals, when river water high in DOC is pushed into the nitrate-rich groundwater below the stream and subsequently returns to the stream may facilitate and enhance the natural attenuation of nitrate in the shallow groundwater.
    Keywords: River-Aquifer Exchange Fluxes ; Heat As a Natural Tracer ; Monsoonal-Type Climate ; Hydraulic Gradient Reversals ; Hydrogeosphere ; Natural Attenuation of Nitrate ; Geography
    ISSN: 0022-1694
    E-ISSN: 1879-2707
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Hydrology, 28 June 2013, Vol.494, pp.72-82
    Description: River discharge is a commonly measured hydrologic variable; however, estimate uncertainty is often higher than acceptable limits. To quantify method limitations and spatiotemporal variability, a multi-year hydrologic flow partitioning investigation was completed under monsoonal conditions in the ungauged complex terrain of the Haean Catchment, South Korea. Our results indicate that sediment transport from a single annual monsoonal event can significantly modify the channel cross-sectional area resulting in inaccurate stage-discharge rating curves. We compare six discharge measurement methods at 13 locations that vary in slope from 1% to 80%, with discharge ranging up to four orders in magnitude, which enabled us to weight the accuracy of each method over a specific range in discharge. The most accurate discharge estimation methods are the weir, the acoustic Doppler current profiler, and the in-stream velocity area method; however, under certain conditions each of these methods is less desirable than other methods. The uncertainty in the three methods is on average 0.4%, 4.7%, and 6.1% of the total discharge, respectively. The accuracy of the discharge estimates has a direct influence on the characterization of basin-wide hydrologic partitioning, which can lead to significant variability in sediment erosion rates and nutrient fate and transport.
    Keywords: Terreco ; Korea ; Discharge ; Baseflow ; Topography ; River ; Geography
    ISSN: 0022-1694
    E-ISSN: 1879-2707
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  • 6
    In: Water Resources Research, January 2017, Vol.53(1), pp.779-798
    Description: In this study, we investigate the impact of single stream discharge events on water exchange, solute transport, and reactions in the hyporheic zone below a natural in‐stream gravel bar. We set up a reactive transport groundwater model with streamflow scenarios that vary by event duration and peak discharge. A steady ambient groundwater flow field is assumed that results in losing, neutral, or gaining stream conditions depending on the stream stage. Across the streambed dissolved oxygen, organic carbon, and nitrate are transported into the subsurface. Additional nitrate is received from upwelling groundwater. Aerobic respiration and denitrification are simulated for scenarios with different stream solute concentrations. Results show that hyporheic exchange flux, solute transport, and consumption increase during events. However, their intensities depend highly on the interplay between event characteristics and ambient groundwater conditions. During events where reversals in the hydraulic gradient occur stream water and solutes infiltrate deeper into the aquifer where they have more time to react. For those events, the reactive efficiency of the hyporheic zone (solute consumption as fraction of influx) for aerobic respiration and denitrification is up to 2.7 and 10 times higher compared to base flow conditions. The fraction of stream nitrate load consumed in the hyporheic zone increases with stream discharge (up to 150 mg/m/h), but remains below the value under base flow conditions for weak events. Events also increase denitrification of groundwater borne nitrate, but groundwater nitrate flux to the stream decreases by up to 33% due to temporary gradient reversals. Transient reactive transport groundwater model of the hyporheic zone for various single discharge events Aerobic respiration and denitrification occur at different timing and locations in the hyporheic zone Reversal in hydraulic gradient direction (gaining to neutral to losing) significantly increases reactive efficiency
    Keywords: Hyporheic Zone ; Discharge Events ; Transient Groundwater Model ; Reactive Transport ; Denitrification
    ISSN: 0043-1397
    E-ISSN: 1944-7973
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Environmental science & technology, 03 September 2013, Vol.47(17), pp.9858-65
    Description: One of the key environmental conditions controlling biogeochemical reactions in aquatic sediments like streambeds is the distribution of dissolved oxygen. We present a novel approach for the in situ measurement of vertical oxygen profiles using a planar luminescence-based optical sensor. The instrument consists of a transparent acrylic tube with the oxygen-sensitive layer mounted on the outside. The luminescence is excited and detected by a moveable piston inside the acrylic tube. Since no moving parts are in contact with the streambed, the disturbance of the subsurface flow field is minimized. The precision of the distributed oxygen sensor (DOS) was assessed by a comparison with spot optodes. Although the precision of the DOS, expressed as standard deviation of calculated oxygen air saturation, is lower (0.2-6.2%) compared to spot optodes (〈0.1-0.6%), variations of the oxygen content along the profile can be resolved. The uncertainty of the calculated oxygen is assessed with a Monte Carlo uncertainty assessment. The obtained vertical oxygen profiles of 40 cm in length reveal variations of the oxygen content reaching from 90% to 0% air saturation and are characterized by patches of low oxygen rather than a continuous decrease with depth.
    Keywords: Environmental Monitoring -- Methods ; Oxygen -- Analysis ; Rivers -- Chemistry
    ISSN: 0013936X
    E-ISSN: 1520-5851
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Advances in Water Resources, 2010, Vol.33(11), pp.1291-1295
    Description: Interest in groundwater (GW)-surface water (SW) interactions has grown steadily over the last two decades. New regulations such as the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) now call for a sustainable management of coupled ground- and surface water resources and linked ecosystems. Embracing this mandate requires new interdisciplinary research on GW-SW systems that addresses the linkages between hydrology, biogeochemistry and ecology at nested scales and specifically accounts for small-scale spatial and temporal patterns of GW-SW exchange. Methods to assess these patterns such as the use of natural tracers (e.g. heat) and integrated surface-subsurface numerical models have been refined and enhanced significantly in recent years and have improved our understanding of processes and dynamics. Numerical models are increasingly used to explore hypotheses and to develop new conceptual models of GW-SW interactions. New technologies like distributed temperature sensing (DTS) allow an assessment of process dynamics at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. These developments are reflected in the contributions to this Special Issue on GW-SW interactions. However, challenges remain in transferring process understanding across scales. ►Rapidly growing interest in groundwater-surface water exchange processes. ►Research on groundwater-surface water interactions has become multidisciplinary. ►New focus on linkages between hydrology, biogeochemistry and ecology. ►Development of new methods and models to quantify spatial and temporal patterns. ►Challenges remain in transferring process understanding across scales.
    Keywords: Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions ; River-Aquifer Exchange ; Engineering
    ISSN: 0309-1708
    E-ISSN: 1872-9657
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Advances in Water Resources, December 2018, Vol.122, pp.60-69
    Description: A systematic understanding of hyporheic flux (HF) and residence times (RT) is important as they are a major control of biogeochemical processing in streambeds. Previous studies addressing the effect of heterogeneity in streambed hydraulic conductivity (K) on HF and RT have come to deviating conclusions depending on the specific study design and the selection of heterogeneity cases being investigated. To more systematically evaluate the effects of conductivity heterogeneity on HF and RT, we simulated hyporheic exchange induced by idealized streambed ripples over a large range of heterogeneities. Conductivity heterogeneity was represented in the simulations in terms of 10,000 different heterogeneity realizations from a geostatistical model based on continuous Gaussian and discrete indicator random fields. We demonstrate that any isotropic homogeneous K-field, as an average of a heterogeneous K-field, can only match RT or HF of the respective heterogeneous K-field, but never both. We found exponential correlations of RT and HF with the variance of heterogeneous conductivity. Based on these correlations, an equivalent anisotropic homogeneous conductivity tensor K can be derived. This equivalent anisotropic K efficiently accounts for the effects of small scale heterogeneity on HF and RT. It can be calculated from the median and variance of the hydraulic conductivity distribution of the targeted heterogeneous sediment, without explicitly characterizing the sediment texture.
    Keywords: Conductivity Heterogeneity ; Hyporheic Exchange ; Residence Time ; Engineering
    ISSN: 0309-1708
    E-ISSN: 1872-9657
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Advances in Water Resources, December 2015, Vol.86, pp.133-146
    Description: Dynamics of solute export from catchments can be classified in terms of chemostatic and chemodynamic export regimes by an analysis of concentration–discharge relationships. Previous studies hypothesized that distinct export regimes emerge from the presence of solute mass stores within the catchment and their connectivity to the stream. However, so far a direct link of solute export to identifiable catchment characteristics is missing. Here we investigate long-term time series of stream water quality and quantity of nine neighboring catchments in Central Germany ranging from relatively pristine mountain catchments to agriculturally dominated lowland catchments, spanning large gradients in land use, geology, and climatic conditions. Given the strong collinearity of catchment characteristics we used partial least square regression analysis to quantify the predictive power of these characteristics for median concentrations and the metrics of export regime. We can show that median concentrations and metrics of the export regimes of major ions and nutrients can indeed be inferred from catchment characteristics. Strongest predictors for median concentrations were the share of arable land, discharge per area, runoff coefficient and available water capacity in the root zone of the catchments. The available water capacity in the root zone, the share of arable land being artificially drained and the topographic gradient were found to be the most relevant predictors for the metrics of export regime. These catchment characteristics can represent the size of solute mass store such as the fraction of arable land being a measure for the store of nitrate. On the other hand, catchment characteristics can be a measure for the connectivity of these solute stores to the stream such as the fraction of tile drained land in the catchments. This study demonstrates the potential of data-driven, top down analyses using simple metrics to classify and better understand dominant controls of solute export from catchments.
    Keywords: Water Quality ; Catchment ; Nutrient Export ; Tile Drain ; Export Regime ; Concentration–Discharge Relationships ; Engineering
    ISSN: 0309-1708
    E-ISSN: 1872-9657
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