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Berlin Brandenburg

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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, 10 April 2016, Vol.50(8), p.488
    Description: Adolescence is a recognised period of physical activity decline, particularly among low-income communities. We report the 12-month (midpoint) effects of a 2-year multicomponent physical activity intervention implemented in disadvantaged secondary schools.
    Keywords: Physical Activity ; Adolescent ; School ; Research
    ISSN: 0306-3674
    ISSN: 03063674
    E-ISSN: 1473-0480
    E-ISSN: 14730480
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: BMC Public Health, 01 January 2013, Vol.13(1), p.57
    Description: Abstract Background Adolescence is an established period of physical activity decline. Multi-component school-based interventions have the potential to slow the decline in adolescents’ physical activity; however, few interventions have been conducted in schools located in low-income or disadvantaged communities. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of a multi-component school-based intervention in reducing the decline in physical activity among students attending secondary schools located in disadvantaged communities. Methods/Design The cluster randomised trial will be conducted with 10 secondary schools located in selected regions of New South Wales, Australia. The schools will be selected from areas that have a level of socio-economic status that is below the state average. Five schools will be allocated to receive an intervention based on the Health Promoting Schools framework, and will be supported by a part-time physical activity consultant placed in intervention schools who will implement a range of intervention adoption strategies. Study measures will be taken at baseline when students are in Year 7 (12–13 years) and again after 12- and 24-months. The primary outcome, minutes of moderate- to-vigorous- intensity physical activity per day and percentage of time in moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA), will be objectively assessed using accelerometers (Actigraph GT3x+). Group allocation and intervention delivery will commence after baseline data collection. The intervention will continue during school terms through to 24-month follow-up. Discussion The study will provide evidence regarding the effectiveness of a multi-component school-based intervention that includes an in-school physical activity consultant targeting the physical activity levels of adolescents in disadvantaged Australian secondary schools. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000382875.
    Keywords: Physical Activity ; Adolescents ; School ; Randomized Controlled Trial ; Public Health
    ISSN: 1471-2458
    E-ISSN: 1471-2458
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 01 April 2017, Vol.14(1), pp.1-26
    Description: Abstract Background Schools play an important role in physical activity promotion for adolescents. The systematic review aimed to determine the proportion of secondary (middle and high) school physical education (PE) lesson time that students spend in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and to assess if MVPA was moderated by school level (middle and high school), type of physical activity measurement and type of PE activities. Methods A systematic search of nine electronic databases was conducted (PROSPERO2014:CRD42014009649). Studies were eligible if they were published between 2005 and 2014; written in English; assessed MVPA in PE lessons of secondary (middle and high) school students; and used a quantitative MVPA measure (i.e., accelerometry, heart rate monitoring, pedometers or observational measures). Two reviewers examined the retrieved articles, assessed risk of bias, and performed data extraction. Random effects meta-analysis was used to calculate a pooled estimate of the percent of PE lesson time spent in MVPA and to assess moderator effects where data allowed. Results The search yielded 5,132 potentially relevant articles; 28 articles representing 25 studies (7 middle and 18 high school) from seven countries were included. Twelve studies measured MVPA through observational measures, seven used accelerometers, five used heart rate monitors and four used pedometers (including three studies using a mix of measures). Meta-analysis of 15 studies found that overall, students spent a mean (95% CI) of 40.5% (34.8–46.2%) of PE in MVPA. Middle school students spent 48.6% (41.3–55.9%) of the lesson in MVPA (n = 5 studies) and high school students 35.9% (28.3–43.6%) (n = 10 studies). Studies measuring MVPA using accelerometers (n = 5) showed that students spent 34.7% (25.1–44.4%) of the lesson in MVPA, while 44.4% (38.3–50.5%) was found for lessons assessed via observation (n = 9), 43.1% (24.3–61.9%) of the lesson for a heart rate based study, and 35.9% (31.0–40.8%) for a pedometer-measured study. Conclusions The proportion of PE spent in MVPA (40.5%) is below the US Centre for Disease Control and Prevention and the UK Associations for Physical Education recommendation of 50%. Findings differed according to the method of MVPA assessment. Additional strategies and intervention research are needed to build more active lesson time in PE.
    Keywords: High School ; Middle School ; Lesson ; Class ; Exercise ; Diet & Clinical Nutrition
    E-ISSN: 1479-5868
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, 22 August 2016, Vol.13, pp.94
    Description: Few school-based interventions have been successful in reducing physical activity decline and preventing overweight and obesity in adolescent populations. As a result, few cost effectiveness analyses have been reported. The aim of this paper is to report the cost and cost effectiveness of the Physical Activity 4 Everyone (PA4E1) intervention which was a multi-component intervention implemented in secondary schools located in low-income communities. Cost effectiveness was assessed using both the physical activity and weight status trial outcomes. Intervention and Study Design: The PA4E1 cluster randomised controlled trial was implemented in 10 Australian secondary schools (5 intervention: 5 control) and consisted of intervention schools receiving seven physical activity promotion strategies and six additional strategies that supported school implementation of the intervention components. Costs associated with physical activity strategies, and intervention implementation strategies within the five intervention schools were estimated and compared to the costs of usual physical activity practices of schools in the control group. The total cost of implementing the intervention was estimated from a societal perspective, based on the number of enrolled students in the target grade at the start of the intervention (Grade 7, n = 837). Economic Outcomes: The economic analysis outcomes were cost and incremental cost effectiveness ratios for the following: minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day gained, MET hours gained per person/day; Body Mass Index (BMI) unit avoided; and 10% reduction in BMI z-score. The intervention cost AUD $329,952 over 24 months, or AUD$394 per student in the intervention group. This resulted in a cost effectiveness ratio of AUD$56 ($35-$147) per additional minute of MVPA, AUD$1 ($0.6-$2.7) per MET hour gained per person per day, AUD$1408 ($788-$6,570) per BMI unit avoided, and AUD$563 ($282-$3,942) per 10% reduction in BMI z-score. PA4E1 is a cost effective intervention for increasing the physical activity levels and reducing unhealthy weight gain in adolescence, a period in which physical activity typically declines. Additional modelling could explore the potential economic impact of the intervention on morbidity and mortality. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000382875.
    Keywords: Adolescents ; Physical Activity ; Randomized Controlled Trial, Low Income, Disadvantaged, Cost Effectiveness, Economic ; School ; Cost-Benefit Analysis ; Exercise ; Poverty ; Schools ; Health Promotion -- Economics ; Obesity -- Prevention & Control ; School Health Services -- Economics
    E-ISSN: 1479-5868
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: BMC public health, 04 July 2019, Vol.19(1), pp.883
    Description: The implementation of interventions at-scale is required to maximise population health benefits. 'Physical Activity 4 Everyone (PA4E1)' was a multi-component school-based program targeting adolescents attending secondary schools in low socio-economic areas. An efficacy trial of the intervention demonstrated an increase in students' mean minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day and lower weight gain at low incremental cost. This study aims to assess the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of a multi-component implementation support intervention to improve implementation, at-scale, of the evidence based school physical activity (PA) practices of the PA4E1 program. Impact on student PA levels and adiposity will also be assessed, in addition to the cost of implementation. A cluster randomised controlled trial, utilising an effectiveness-implementation hybrid design, will be conducted in up to 76 secondary schools located in lower socio-economic areas across four health districts in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Schools will be randomly allocated to a usual practice control arm or a multi-component implementation support intervention to embed the seven school PA practices of the PA4E1 program. The implementation support intervention incorporates seven strategies including executive support, in-School Champion, teacher training, resources, prompts, audit and feedback and access to an external Support Officer. The primary trial outcome will be the proportion of schools meeting at least four of the seven physical activity practices of the program, assessed via surveys with Head Physical Education teachers at 12 and 24-months. Secondary outcomes will be assessed via a nested evaluation of student PA and adiposity at 12-months (Grade 8 students) and 24 months (Grade 9 students) undertaken in 30 schools (15 per group). Resource use associated with the implementation intervention will be measured prospectively. Linear mixed effects regression models will assess program effects on the primary outcome at each follow-up period. This study is one of few evidence-based multi-component PA programs scaled-up to a large number of secondary schools and evaluated via randomised controlled trial. The use of implementation science theoretical frameworks to implement the evidence-based program and the rigorous evaluation design are strengths of the study. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12617000681358 registered 12th May 2017. Protocol Version 1.
    Keywords: Adolescents ; Physical Activity ; Randomised Controlled Trial, Implementation, Multi-Component, Scale-Up ; School ; Exercise ; Pediatric Obesity -- Prevention & Control ; School Health Services -- Organization & Administration ; Students -- Psychology
    E-ISSN: 1471-2458
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