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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Forest Ecology and Management, Dec 15, 2013, Vol.310, p.110(10)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2013.08.006 Byline: Michael Goisser, Ulrich Zang, Egbert Matzner, Werner Borken, Karl-Heinz Haberle, Rainer Matyssek Abstract: acents Response of juvenile European beech upon transplant to heterogeneous light and water availability. acents Plant response was examined along the gradients of light and water availability. acents High light acclimation exacerbated productivity decline under drought. acents Progressive acclimation to shade and drought mitigated productivity decline within the study period. Article History: Received 18 April 2013; Revised 4 August 2013; Accepted 5 August 2013
    Keywords: Water ; Industrial Productivity
    ISSN: 0378-1127
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Forest Ecology and Management, 15 December 2013, Vol.310, pp.110-119
    Description: Climate models predict increasing frequency and intensity of summer drought events for Central Europe. In a field experiment, we investigated the response of young beech ( L.) to extreme and repeated summer drought and the modulation of drought response patterns along the natural gradient of light availability at the study site. In autumn 2008, two-year-old, nursery derived beech – as used for forest conversion practices – was planted under a Norway spruce stand primarily opened through winter storm. Precipitation was manipulated in the growing seasons of 2009 through 2011, inducing a pronounced gradient of water availability. Individual drought-stress doses (DSD) and light doses (LD) were calculated for each beech sapling during the three growing seasons. Plant growth, CO -assimilation rate and stomatal conductance were reduced with increasing drought stress, but facilitated by increasing light availability. Progressive acclimation to water and light limitation during the three years of the experiment led to a decreased drought and shade sensitivity of diameter growth. Water-use efficiency, root/shoot ratio and rooting depth, were increased with decreasing water availability. Mean fine root diameter and specific fine root length correlated positively with both DSD and LD. Proceeding low-light acclimation was indicated by progressively increasing specific leaf area and reduced leaf dark-respiration. Present results suggest that nursery-induced high-light acclimation of the beech saplings, exacerbated light limitation upon transplant and hence productivity decline under co-occurring water limitation.
    Keywords: European Beech ; Drought ; Light ; Restoration ; Acclimation ; Forestry ; Biology
    ISSN: 0378-1127
    E-ISSN: 1872-7042
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, April 2014, Vol.177(2), pp.168-177
    Description: Soil drought influences the C turnover as well as the fine‐root system of tree saplings. Particularly during the period of establishment, the susceptibility to drought stress of saplings is increased because of incompletely developed root systems and reduced access to soil water. Here, we subjected beech saplings ( L.) to different levels of drought stress. Beech saplings were planted in rhizotrons, which were installed in the soil of a Norway spruce forest before bud burst. Soil moisture was manipulated in the following year during May to September. We measured photosynthetic net CO uptake, volume production of fine roots, and rhizosphere respiration during the growing season. Biometric parameters of the fine‐root system, biomass, and nonstructural carbohydrates were analyzed upon harvest in October. Photosynthesis and rhizosphere respiration decreased with increasing drought‐stress dose (cumulated soil water potential), and cumulative rhizosphere respiration was significantly negatively correlated with drought‐stress dose. Fine‐root length and volume production were highest at moderate soil drought, but decreased at severe soil drought. The proportion of fine‐roots diameter 〈 0.2 mm and the root‐to‐shoot ratio increased whereas the live‐to‐dead ratio of fine roots decreased with increasing drought‐stress dose. We conclude that the belowground C allocation as well as the relative water‐uptake efficiency of beech saplings is increased under drought.
    Keywords: Drought Stress ; European Beech ; Fine Roots ; Rhizosphere Respiration ; Rhizotrons
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
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  • 4
    In: Tree Physiology, 2014, Vol. 34(1), pp.29-38
    Description: Drought reduces the carbon (C) assimilation of trees and decouples aboveground from belowground carbon fluxes, but little is known about the response of drought-stressed trees to rewetting. This study aims to assess dynamics and patterns of C allocation in beech saplings under dry and rewetted soil conditions. In October 2010, 5-year-old beech saplings from a forest site were transplanted into 20 l pots. In 2011, the saplings were subjected to different levels of soil drought ranging from non-limiting water supply (control) to severe water limitation with soil water potentials of less than −1.5 MPa. As a physiologically relevant measure of drought, the cumulated soil water potential (i.e., drought stress dose (DSD)) was calculated for the growing season. In late August, the saplings were transferred into a climate chamber and pulse-labeled with 13 C-depleted CO 2 (δ 13 C of −47‰). Isotopic signatures in leaf and soil respiration were repeatedly measured. Five days after soil rewetting, a second label was applied using 99 atom% 13 CO 2 . After another 12 days, the fate of assimilated C in each sapling was assessed by calculating the 13 C mass balance. Photosynthesis decreased by 60% in saplings under severe drought. The mean residence time (MRT) of recent assimilates in leaf respiration was more than three times longer than under non-limited conditions and was positively correlated to DSD. Also, the appearance of the label in soil respiration was delayed. Within 5 days after rewetting, photosynthesis, MRT of recent assimilates in leaf respiration and appearance of the label in soil respiration recovered fully. Despite the fast recovery, less label was recovered in the biomass of the previously drought-stressed plants, which also allocated less C to the root compartment (45 vs 64% in the control). We conclude that beech saplings quickly recover from extreme soil drought, although transitional after-effects prevail in C allocation, possibly due to repair-driven respiratory processes.
    Keywords: Carbon Balance ; Carbon Fluxes ; Drought Stress Quantification ; Labeling ; Recovery
    ISSN: 0829-318X
    E-ISSN: 1758-4469
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