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  • Article  (7)
  • Hinton, Jay C. D.  (7)
  • Salmonella
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  • Article  (7)
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 27 March 2012, Vol.109(13), pp.E757-64
    Description: SgrS RNA is a model for the large class of Hfq-associated small RNAs that act to posttranscriptionally regulate bacterial mRNAs. The function of SgrS is well-characterized in nonpathogenic Escherichia coli, where it was originally shown to counteract glucose-phosphate stress by acting as a repressor of the ptsG mRNA, which encodes the major glucose transporter. We have discovered additional SgrS targets in Salmonella Typhimurium, a pathogen related to E. coli that recently acquired one-quarter of all genes by horizontal gene transfer. We show that the conserved short seed region of SgrS that recognizes ptsG was recruited to target the Salmonella-specific sopD mRNA of a secreted virulence protein. The SgrS-sopD interaction is exceptionally selective; we find that sopD2 mRNA, whose gene arose from sopD duplication during Salmonella evolution, is deaf to SgrS because of a nonproductive G-U pair in the potential SgrS-sopD2 RNA duplex vs. G-C in SgrS-sopD. In other words, SgrS discriminates the two virulence factor mRNAs at the level of a single hydrogen bond. Our study suggests that bacterial pathogens use their large suites of conserved Hfq-associated regulators to integrate horizontally acquired genes into existing posttranscriptional networks, just as conserved transcription factors are recruited to tame foreign genes at the DNA level. The results graphically illustrate the importance of the seed regions of bacterial small RNAs to select new targets with high fidelity and suggest that target predictions must consider all or none decisions by individual seed nucleotides.
    Keywords: Phylogeny ; Base Pairing -- Genetics ; Gene Transfer, Horizontal -- Genetics ; RNA, Bacterial -- Genetics ; Salmonella -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 2
    In: Molecular Microbiology, September 2011, Vol.81(5), pp.1144-1165
    Description: GcvB is one of the most highly conserved Hfq‐associated small RNAs in Gram‐negative bacteria and was previously reported to repress several ABC transporters for amino acids. To determine the full extent of GcvB‐mediated regulation in , we combined a genome‐wide experimental approach with biocomputational target prediction. Comparative pulse expression of wild‐type versus mutant sRNA variants revealed that GcvB governs a large post‐transcriptional regulon, impacting ∼1% of all genes via its conserved G/U‐rich domain R1. Complementary predictions of C/A‐rich binding sites in mRNAs and reporter fusion experiments increased the number of validated GcvB targets to more than 20, and doubled the number of regulated amino acid transporters. Unlike the previously described targeting via the single R1 domain, GcvB represses the glycine transporter CycA by exceptionally redundant base‐pairing. This novel ability of GcvB is focused upon the one target that could feedback‐regulate the glycine‐responsive synthesis of GcvB. Several newly discovered mRNA targets involved in amino acid metabolism, including the global regulator Lrp, question the previous assumption that GcvB simply acts to limit unnecessary amino acid uptake. Rather, GcvB rewires primary transcriptional control circuits and seems to act as a distinct regulatory node in amino acid metabolism.
    Keywords: Glycine -- Physiological Aspects ; Genetic Research -- Physiological Aspects ; Genomics -- Physiological Aspects ; Messenger Rna -- Physiological Aspects;
    ISSN: 0950-382X
    E-ISSN: 1365-2958
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  • 3
    In: Molecular Microbiology, May 2012, Vol.84(3), pp.428-445
    Description: MicF is a textbook example of a small regulatory RNA (sRNA) that acts on a ‐encoded target mRNA through imperfect base pairing. Discovery of MicF as a post‐transcriptional repressor of the major porin OmpF established the paradigm for a meanwhile common mechanism of translational inhibition, through antisense sequestration of a ribosome binding site. However, whether MicF regulates additional genes has remained unknown for almost three decades. Here, we have harnessed the new superfolder variant of GFP for reporter–gene fusions to validate newly predicted targets of MicF in . We show that the conserved 5′ end of MicF acts by seed pairing to repress the mRNAs of global transcriptional regulator Lrp, and periplasmic protein YahO, while a second targeting region is also required to regulate the mRNA of the lipid A‐modifying enzyme LpxR. Interestingly, MicF targets at both the ribosome binding site and deep within the coding sequence. MicF binding in the coding sequence of decreases mRNA stability through exacerbating the use of a native RNase E site proximal to the short MicF‐ duplex. Altogether, this study assigns the classic MicF sRNA to the growing class of Hfq‐associated regulators that use diverse mechanisms to impact multiple loci.
    Keywords: Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial ; Bacterial Proteins -- Genetics ; Green Fluorescent Proteins -- Metabolism ; Porins -- Genetics ; RNA, Bacterial -- Metabolism ; RNA, Small Untranslated -- Metabolism ; Salmonella Typhimurium -- Metabolism;
    ISSN: 0950-382X
    E-ISSN: 1365-2958
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  • 4
    In: Molecular Microbiology, October 2009, Vol.74(1), pp.139-158
    Description: The small RNA, ArcZ (previously RyhA/SraH), was discovered in several genome‐wide screens in and . Its high degree of genomic conservation, its frequent recovery by shotgun sequencing, and its association with the RNA chaperone, Hfq, identified ArcZ as an abundant enterobacterial ‘core’ small RNA, yet its function remained unknown. Here, we report that ArcZ acts as a post‐transcriptional regulator in , repressing the mRNAs of the widely distributed (serine uptake) and (oxidative stress) genes, and of STM3216, a horizontally acquired methyl‐accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP). Both and STM3216 are regulated by sequestration of the ribosome binding site. In contrast, the mRNA is targeted in the coding sequence (CDS), arguing that CDS targeting is more common than appreciated. Transcriptomic analysis of an deletion strain further argued for the existence of a distinct set of loci specifically regulated by ArcZ. In contrast, increased expression of the sRNA altered the steady‐state levels of 〉 16% (〉 750) of all mRNAs, and rendered the bacteria non‐motile. Deep sequencing detected a dramatically changed profile of Hfq‐bound sRNAs and mRNAs, suggesting that the unprecedented pleiotropic effects by a single sRNA might in part be caused by altered post‐transcriptional regulation.
    Keywords: Biology;
    ISSN: 0950-382X
    E-ISSN: 1365-2958
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  • 5
    In: Molecular Microbiology, May 2008, Vol.68(4), pp.890-906
    Description: Post‐transcriptional repression of porin synthesis has emerged as a major function of Hfq‐dependent, small non‐coding RNAs (sRNAs). Many enterobacteria express OmpX‐like porins, a family of outer membrane proteins whose physiological roles and structural properties have been studied intensively. While regulatory sRNAs have been identified for most major and many minor porins of and , a post‐transcriptional regulator of OmpX levels has never been found. Here, we have taken a ‘reverse target search’ approach by systematic inactivation of sRNA genes, and screening 35 sRNA deletion strains for effects on OmpX synthesis. We have identified the Hfq‐dependent CyaR (formerly RyeE) sRNA as an repressor. Global transcriptomic profiling following induction of CyaR expression suggests that mRNA is the primary target of this sRNA under standard growth conditions. The results of phylogenetic and mutational analyses suggest that a conserved RNA hairpin of CyaR, featuring a C‐rich apical loop, acts to sequester the Shine–Dalgarno sequence of mRNA and to inhibit translational initiation. We have also discovered that expression is tightly controlled by the cyclic AMP receptor protein, CRP. This represents a new link between porin repression and nutrient availability that is likely to be widely conserved among enterobacteria.
    Keywords: Genetic Research -- Genetic Aspects ; Genetic Research -- Physiological Aspects ; Bacterial Genetics -- Genetic Aspects ; Bacterial Genetics -- Physiological Aspects ; Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate -- Genetic Aspects ; Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate -- Physiological Aspects ; Salmonella -- Genetic Aspects ; Salmonella -- Physiological Aspects ; Rna -- Genetic Aspects ; Rna -- Physiological Aspects ; Porins -- Genetic Aspects ; Porins -- Physiological Aspects;
    ISSN: 0950-382X
    E-ISSN: 1365-2958
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  • 6
    In: Molecular Microbiology, December 2006, Vol.62(6), pp.1674-1688
    Description: The bacterial envelope stress response (ESR) is triggered by the accumulation of misfolded outer membrane proteins (OMPs) upon envelope damage or excessive OMP synthesis, and is mediated by the alternative sigma factor, σ. Activation of the σ pathway causes a rapid downregulation of major mRNAs, which prevents further build‐up of unassembled OMPs and liberates the translocation and folding apparatus under conditions that require envelope remodelling. The factors that facilitate the rapid removal of the unusually stable mRNAs in the ESR were previously unknown. We report that in the ESR relies upon two highly conserved, σ‐controlled small non‐coding RNAs, RybB and MicA. By using a transcriptomic approach and kinetic analyses of target mRNA decay , RybB was identified as the factor that selectively accelerates the decay of multiple major mRNAs upon induction of the ESR, while MicA is proposed to facilitate rapid decay of the single mRNA. In unstressed bacterial cells, the two σ‐dependent small RNAs function within a surveillance loop to maintain envelope homeostasis and to achieve autoregulation of σ.
    Keywords: Mrna Turnover ; Envelopes ; Outer Membrane Proteins ; Kinetics ; Non-Coding RNA ; Stress ; Homeostasis ; Sigma Factor ; Translocation ; Salmonella ; RNA ; Genetics & Taxonomy;
    ISSN: 0950-382X
    E-ISSN: 1365-2958
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: PLoS Genetics, 2008, Vol.4(8), p.e1000163
    Description: Recent advances in high-throughput pyrosequencing (HTPS) technology now allow a thorough analysis of RNA bound to cellular proteins, and, therefore, of post-transcriptional regulons. We used HTPS to discover the Salmonella RNAs that are targeted by the common bacterial Sm-like protein, Hfq. Initial transcriptomic analysis revealed that Hfq controls the expression of almost a fifth of all Salmonella genes, including several horizontally acquired pathogenicity islands (SPI-1, -2, -4, -5), two sigma factor regulons, and the flagellar gene cascade. Subsequent HTPS analysis of 350,000 cDNAs, derived from RNA co-immunoprecipitation (coIP) with epitope-tagged Hfq or control coIP, identified 727 mRNAs that are Hfq-bound in vivo . The cDNA analysis discovered new, small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) and more than doubled the number of sRNAs known to be expressed in Salmonella to 64; about half of these are associated with Hfq. Our analysis explained aspects of the pleiotropic effects of Hfq loss-of-function. Specifically, we found that the mRNAs of hilD (master regulator of the SPI-1 invasion genes) and flhDC (flagellar master regulator) were bound by Hfq. We predicted that defective SPI-1 secretion and flagellar phenotypes of the hfq mutant would be rescued by overexpression of HilD and FlhDC, and we proved this to be correct. The combination of epitope-tagging and HTPS of immunoprecipitated RNA detected the expression of many intergenic chromosomal regions of Salmonella . Our approach overcomes the limited availability of high-density microarrays that have impeded expression-based sRNA discovery in microorganisms. We present a generic strategy that is ideal for the systems-level analysis of the post-transcriptional regulons of RNA-binding proteins and for sRNA discovery in a wide range of bacteria. ; The past decade has seen small regulatory RNA become an important new mediator of bacterial mRNA regulation. This study describes a rapid way to identify novel sRNAs that are expressed, and should prove relevant to a variety of bacteria. We purified the epitope-tagged RNA-binding protein, Hfq, and its bound RNA by immunoprecipitation from the model pathogen, serovar Typhimurium. This new strategy used Next Generation pyrosequencing to identify 727 Hfq-bound mRNAs. The numbers of sRNAs expressed in was doubled to 64; half are associated with Hfq. We defined the exact coordinates of sRNAs, and confirmed that they are expressed at significant levels. We also determined the Hfq regulon in , and reported the role of Hfq in controlling transcription of major pathogenicity islands, horizontally acquired regions, and the flagellar cascade. Hfq is reported to be a global regulator that affects the expression of almost a fifth of all genes. Our new approach will allow sRNAs and mRNAs to be characterized from different genetic backgrounds, or from bacteria grown under particular environmental conditions. It will be valuable to scientists working on genetically tractable bacteria who are interested in the function of RNA-binding proteins and the identification of sRNAs.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biochemistry -- Bioinformatics ; Genetics And Genomics -- Functional Genomics ; Genetics And Genomics -- Gene Expression ; Microbiology ; Microbiology -- Microbial Evolution And Genomics
    ISSN: 1553-7390
    E-ISSN: 1553-7404
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