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Berlin Brandenburg

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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Biochemical Pharmacology, 01 February 2010, Vol.79(3), pp.413-420
    Description: The antioxidant N-acetyl- -cysteine (NAC) had been shown to inhibit replication of seasonal human influenza A viruses. Here, the effects of NAC on virus replication, virus-induced pro-inflammatory responses and virus-induced apoptosis were investigated in H5N1-infected lung epithelial (A549) cells. NAC at concentrations ranging from 5 to 15 mM reduced H5N1-induced cytopathogenic effects (CPEs), virus-induced apoptosis and infectious viral yields 24 h post-infection. NAC also decreased the production of pro-inflammatory molecules (CXCL8, CXCL10, CCL5 and interleukin-6 (IL-6)) in H5N1-infected A549 cells and reduced monocyte migration towards supernatants of H5N1-infected A549 cells. The antiviral and anti-inflammatory mechanisms of NAC included inhibition of activation of oxidant sensitive pathways including transcription factor NF-κB and mitogen activated protein kinase p38. Pharmacological inhibitors of NF-κB (BAY 11-7085) or p38 (SB203580) exerted similar effects like those determined for NAC in H5N1-infected cells. The combination of BAY 11-7085 and SB203580 resulted in increased inhibitory effects on virus replication and production of pro-inflammatory molecules relative to either single treatment. NAC inhibits H5N1 replication and H5N1-induced production of pro-inflammatory molecules. Therefore, antioxidants like NAC represent a potential additional treatment option that could be considered in the case of an influenza A virus pandemic.
    Keywords: Ros ; NAC ; Cytokines ; H5n1 ; Apoptosis ; Pharmacy, Therapeutics, & Pharmacology ; Chemistry
    ISSN: 0006-2952
    E-ISSN: 1873-2968
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Neoplasia, January 2009, Vol.11(1), pp.1-9
    Description: Although human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is generally not regarded to be an oncogenic virus, HCMV infection has been implicated in malignant diseases from different cancer entities. On the basis of our experimental findings, we developed the concept of “oncomodulation” to better explain the role of HCMV in cancer. Oncomodulation means that HCMV infects tumor cells and increases their malignancy. By this concept, HCMV was proposed to be a therapeutic target in a fraction of cancer patients. However, the clinical relevance of HCMV-induced oncomodulation remains to be clarified. One central question that has to be definitively answered is if HCMV establishes persistent virus replication in tumor cells or not. In our eyes, recent clinical findings from different groups in glioblastoma patients and especially the detection of a correlation between the numbers of HCMV-infected glioblastoma cells and tumor stage (malignancy) strongly increase the evidence that HCMV may exert oncomodulatory effects. Here, we summarize the currently available knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that may contribute to oncomodulation by HCMV as well as the clinical findings that suggest that a fraction of tumors from different entities is indeed infected with HCMV.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 1476-5586
    ISSN: 20452322
    E-ISSN: 1476-5586
    E-ISSN: 20452322
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, 15 October 2008, Vol.14(20), pp.6531-7
    Description: Neuroblastomas frequently show expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and may therefore be susceptible to EGFR-targeted therapies. Here, EGFR expression and functionality was investigated in parental chemosensitive neuroblastoma cell lines (UKF-NB-3, IMR-32, NLF, SH-SY5Y) and their cisplatin-resistant sublines (UKF-NB-3(r)CDDP(1000), IMR-32(r)CDDP(1000), NLF(r)CDDP(1000), and SH-SY5Y(r)CDDP(500)). Moreover, the EGFR antibody cetuximab, the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor Tyrphostin B46, and recombinant EGFR-targeted toxins were investigated for their influence on the viability and growth of neuroblastoma cells. EGFR expression and function was measured by flow cytometry or Western blot. Cell viability was detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Apoptosis was examined by immunostaining for active caspase-3 or cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Cellular binding of FITC-labeled immunotoxins was studied by flow cytometry, and cellular uptake was studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The EGFR-targeted antibody and growth factor toxins scFv(14E1)- Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA) and TGF-alpha-ETA exerted anti-cancer effects in neuroblastoma cell lines that were insensitive to cetuximab or EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Furthermore, adaptation of chemosensitive neuroblastoma cells to cisplatin increased EGFR expression and sensitivity to both recombinant toxins. Treatment of chemosensitive neuroblastoma cells with cisplatin reversibly increased EGFR expression, whereas cisplatin-resistant cells showed enhanced EGFR expression independent of the presence of cisplatin. Combination treatment with scFv(14E1)-ETA or TGF-alpha-ETA and cisplatin exerted significantly improved anticancer effects compared with either single treatment in parental neuroblastoma cells, cisplatin-resistant sublines, and primary cultures. EGFR-targeted cytotoxic reagents such as scFv(14E1)-ETA and TGF-alpha-ETA represent promising candidates for further development as antineuroblastoma agents, especially in combination with cisplatin.
    Keywords: Drug Resistance, Neoplasm ; Adp Ribose Transferases -- Therapeutic Use ; Antineoplastic Agents -- Pharmacology ; Bacterial Toxins -- Therapeutic Use ; Cell Proliferation -- Drug Effects ; Cisplatin -- Pharmacology ; Erbb Receptors -- Antagonists & Inhibitors ; Exotoxins -- Therapeutic Use ; Neuroblastoma -- Drug Therapy ; Virulence Factors -- Therapeutic Use
    ISSN: 1078-0432
    E-ISSN: 15573265
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  • 4
    In: Anti-Cancer Drugs, 2000, Vol.11(5), pp.369-376
    Description: Bovine seminal ribonuclease (BS-RNase) is a protein with a number of biological effects. It shows antitumoral, aspermatogenic, antiembryonic, immunosuppressive and antiviral properties. The cytotoxic effects appear to be specific for tumor cells as non-malignant cells seem to be unaffected in vitro. Unfortunately, the in vivo application of BS-RNase so far was successful only when it was administered intratumorally. Therefore, the objective of the present investigation was to improve the properties of BS-RNase by attachment to nanoparticles made of polylactic acid (PLA-NP) using an adsorption method. This preparation was tested in vitro against leukemia (MOLT-4) and lymphoma (H9) cell lines sensitive and resistant to cytarabine. No difference between the nanoparticle preparation and pure BS-RNase was found in these tests. To examine the in vivo effects, the preparations were tested for their aspermatogenic and antiembryonal efficacy compared to the pure BS-RNase as a rapid test for antitumoral activity. The aspermatogenic and antiembryonal effects were enhanced by the nanoparticle preparation. Consequently, BS-RNase loaded adsorptively to PLA-NP holds promise for the in vivo use as an antitumoral agent. Further research will investigate the efficacy of this preparations in an in vivo tumor model.
    Keywords: Antineoplastic Agents -- Pharmacology ; Endoribonucleases -- Pharmacology ; Leukemia -- Drug Therapy ; Lymphoma -- Drug Therapy ; Tumor Cells, Cultured -- Drug Effects;
    ISSN: 0959-4973
    E-ISSN: 14735741
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