Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Plant Physiology, 2005, Vol.138, pp.1690-1699
    Description: Crop improvement by genetic modification remains controversial, one of the major issues being the potential for unintended effects. Comparative safety assessment includes targeted analysis of key nutrients and antinutritional factors, but broader scale-profiling or ‘‘omics'' methods could...
    Keywords: Life Sciences ; Ecology, Environment ; Botany
    ISSN: 0032-0889
    E-ISSN: 1532-2548
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    In: Environmental Microbiology, February 2008, Vol.10(2), pp.534-541
    Description: Soils support an enormous microbial diversity, but the ecological drivers of this diversity are poorly understood. Interactions between the roots of individual grass species and the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and bacteria in their rhizoplane were studied in a grazed, unimproved upland pasture. Individual root fragments were isolated from soil cores, DNA extracted and used to identify plant species and assess rhizoplane bacterial and AM fungal assemblages, by amplifying part of the small‐subunit ribosomal RNA gene, followed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. For the first time we showed that AM fungal and bacterial assemblages are related and that this relationship occurred at the community level. Principal coordinate analyses of the data show that the AM fungi were a major factor determining the bacterial assemblage on grass roots. We also report a strong influence of the composition of the plant community on AM fungal assemblage. The bacterial assemblage was also influenced by soil pH and was spatially structured, whereas AM fungi were influenced neither by the bacteria nor by soil pH. Our study shows that linkages between plant roots and their microbial communities exist in a complex web of interactions that act at individual and at community levels, with AM fungi influencing the bacterial assemblage, but not the other way round.
    Keywords: Ribosomal Rna -- Analysis;
    ISSN: 1462-2912
    E-ISSN: 1462-2920
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: PROTEOMICS, June 2006, Vol.6(12), pp.3696-3706
    Description: is increasingly acknowledged as one of the best models for studying metal hyperaccumulation in plants. In order to study the mechanisms underlying metal hyperaccumulation, we used proteomic profiling to identify differences in protein intensities among three accessions with pronounced differences in tolerance, uptake and root to shoot translocation of Zn and Cd. Proteins were separated using two‐dimensional electrophoresis and stained with SYPRO Orange. Intensity values and quality scores were obtained for each spot by using PDQuest software. Principal component analysis was used to test the separation of the protein profiles of the three plant accessions at various metal exposures, and to detect groups of proteins responsible for the differences. Spot sets representing individual proteins were analysed with the analysis of variance and non‐parametric Kruskal‐Wallis test. Clearest differences were seen among the accessions, while the effects of metal exposures were less pronounced. The 48 tentatively identified spots represent core metabolic functions ( photosynthesis, nitrogen assimilation, carbohydrate metabolism) as well as putative signalling and regulatory functions. The possible roles of some of the proteins in heavy metal accumulation and tolerance are discussed.
    Keywords: Metal Hyperaccumulator ; Principal Component Analysis ; Statistics ; Thlaspi ; Two‐Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis
    ISSN: 1615-9853
    E-ISSN: 1615-9861
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: FEMS microbiology ecology, May 2006, Vol.56(2), pp.310-20
    Description: Soil microbial communities play an important role in nutrient cycling and nutrient availability, especially in unimproved soils. In grazed pastures, sheep urine causes local changes in nutrient concentration which may be a source of heterogeneity in microbial community structure. In the present study, we investigated the effects of synthetic urine on soil microbial community structure, using physiological (community level physiological profiling, CLPP), biochemical (phospholipid fatty acid analysis, PLFA) and molecular (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, DGGE) fingerprinting methods. PLFA data suggested that synthetic urine treatment had no significant effect on total microbial (total PLFA), total bacterial or fungal biomass; however, significant changes in microbial community structure were observed with both PLFA and DGGE data. PLFA data suggested that synthetic urine induced a shift towards communities with higher concentrations of branched fatty acids. DGGE banding patterns derived from control and treated soils differed, due to a higher proportion of DNA sequences migrating only to the upper regions of the gel in synthetic urine-treated samples. The shifts in community structure measured by PLFA and DGGE were significantly correlated with one another, suggesting that both datasets reflected the same changes in microbial communities. Synthetic urine treatment preferentially stimulated the use of rhizosphere-C in sole-carbon-source utilisation profiles. The changes caused by synthetic urine addition accounted for only 10-15% of the total variability in community structure, suggesting that overall microbial community structure was reasonably stable and that changes were confined to a small proportion of the communities.
    Keywords: Ecosystem ; Soil Microbiology ; Sheep -- Urine
    ISSN: 0168-6496
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 2006, Vol. 56(2), pp.310-320
    Description: Soil microbial communities play an important role in nutrient cycling and nutrient availability, especially in unimproved soils. In grazed pastures, sheep urine causes local changes in nutrient concentration which may be a source of heterogeneity in microbial community structure. In the present study, we investigated the effects of synthetic urine on soil microbial community structure, using physiological (community level physiological profiling, CLPP), biochemical (phospholipid fatty acid analysis, PLFA) and molecular (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, DGGE) fingerprinting methods. PLFA data suggested that synthetic urine treatment had no significant effect on total microbial (total PLFA), total bacterial or fungal biomass; however, significant changes in microbial community structure were observed with both PLFA and DGGE data. PLFA data suggested that synthetic urine induced a shift towards communities with higher concentrations of branched fatty acids. DGGE banding patterns derived from control and treated soils differed, due to a higher proportion of DNA sequences migrating only to the upper regions of the gel in synthetic urine-treated samples. The shifts in community structure measured by PLFA and DGGE were significantly correlated with one another, suggesting that both datasets reflected the same changes in microbial communities. Synthetic urine treatment preferentially stimulated the use of rhizosphere-C in sole-carbon-source utilisation profiles. The changes caused by synthetic urine addition accounted for only 10–15% of the total variability in community structure, suggesting that overall microbial community structure was reasonably stable and that changes were confined to a small proportion of the communities.
    Keywords: Microbial Community Structure ; Phospholipid Fatty Acid Analysis ; Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis ; Biolog ; Soil Solution Chemistry
    ISSN: 01686496
    E-ISSN: 1574-6941
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages