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  • Pineles, Suzanne L.
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Psychological Assessment, 2013, Vol.25(3), pp.1037-1043
    Description: Most research on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) relies on clinician-administered interview and self-report measures to establish the presence/absence and severity of the disorder. Accurate diagnosis of PTSD is made challenging by the presence of symptoms shared with other psychopathologies and the subjective nature of patients’ descriptions of their symptoms. A physiological assessment capable of reliably “diagnosing” PTSD could provide adjunctive information that might mitigate these diagnostic limitations. In the present study, we examined the construct validity of a potential psychophysiological measure of PTSD, that is, psychophysiological reactivity to script-driven imagery (SDI–PR), as measured against the current diagnostic “gold-standard” for PTSD, the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS). Convergent and predictive validity and stability were examined. Thirty-six individuals completed an SDI–PR procedure, the CAPS, and self-report measures of mental and physical health at their initial visit and approximately 6 months later. SDI–PR and the CAPS demonstrated excellent stability across measurement occasions. SDI–PR showed moderately strong convergent validity with the CAPS. After adjusting for self-reported depression, predictive validity for the CAPS, with regard to health sequelae, was reduced, whereas it remained mostly unchanged for SDI–PR. Findings support SDI–PR as a valid and stable measure of PTSD that captures a pathophysiologic process in individuals with PTSD. Results are discussed with regard to the research domain criteria framework.
    Keywords: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder ; Ptsd ; Psychophysiology ; Reliability ; Depression
    ISSN: 1040-3590
    E-ISSN: 1939-134X
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 2016, Vol.125(3), pp.349-355
    Description: The propensity to acquire and retain conditioned fear responses may contribute to the risk of developing and maintaining posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following a traumatic event. There is growing evidence that the gonadal hormones estrogen and progesterone are associated with how well women retain extinction of previously conditioned fear responses. Thus, sex steroid effects may contribute to the increased prevalence of PTSD in women. For the current study, 32 nonmedicated female trauma survivors with and without PTSD completed a differential fear conditioning task both during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle when estradiol and progesterone levels are low, and during the midluteal phase when estradiol and progesterone levels are high. Skin conductance served as the measure of conditioned fear. Women with PTSD, compared to those without, showed impaired retention of extinction learning in the midluteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Therefore, the impact of menstrual phase on extinction retention may differ between women with and without PTSD. These findings raise potential considerations regarding the coordination of psychopharmacologic and trauma exposure-based treatments for PTSD with specific phases of the menstrual cycle. ; This study suggests that women with PTSD are vulnerable to problems with retaining extinction of previously conditioned fear responses during the phase of the menstrual cycle when estradiol and progesterone are relatively high. This pattern of responding differs from women who have experienced trauma, but do not meet criteria for PTSD.
    Keywords: Extinction Retention ; Menstrual Cycle ; Estradiol ; Progesterone ; Ptsd
    ISSN: 0021-843X
    E-ISSN: 1939-1846
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 2016, Vol.125(3), p.349(7)
    Description: The propensity to acquire and retain conditioned fear responses may contribute to the risk of developing and maintaining posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following a traumatic event. There is growing evidence that the gonadal hormones estrogen and progesterone are associated with how well women retain extinction of previously conditioned fear responses. Thus, sex steroid effects may contribute to the increased prevalence of PTSD in women. For the current study, 32 nonmedicated female trauma survivors with and without PTSD completed a differential fear conditioning task both during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle when estradiol and progesterone levels are low, and during the midluteal phase when estradiol and progesterone levels are high. Skin conductance served as the measure of conditioned fear. Women with PTSD, compared to those without, showed impaired retention of extinction learning in the midluteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Therefore, the impact of menstrual phase on extinction retention may differ between women with and without PTSD. These findings raise potential considerations regarding the coordination of psychopharmacologic and trauma exposure-based treatments for PTSD with specific phases of the menstrual cycle.
    Keywords: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder – Care and Treatment ; Women – Psychological Aspects ; Trauma (Psychology) – Analysis
    ISSN: 0021-843X
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Traumatic Stress, December 2010, Vol.23(6), pp.775-784
    Description: Studies have assessed relationships between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and physiological reactivity concurrently; fewer have assessed these relationships longitudinally. This study tests concurrent and prospective relationships between physiological reactivity (heart rate and skin conductance) to a monologue procedure and PTSD symptoms in female assault survivors, tested within 1 and 3 months posttrauma. After controlling for initial PTSD and peritraumatic dissociation, 3 measures of increased physiological reactivity to the trauma monologue at 1 month predicted 3‐month PTSD reexperiencing severity. Additionally, increased heart rate following trauma and neutral monologues at 1 month was predictive of 3‐month numbing symptoms. Implications for the prospective relationship between physiological reactivity to trauma cues and PTSD over time are discussed.
    Keywords: Interview, Psychological -- Methods ; Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic -- Physiopathology ; Survivors -- Psychology;
    ISSN: 0894-9867
    E-ISSN: 1573-6598
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 2013, Vol.5(2), pp.158-166
    Description: The relationship between partner violence and physical health symptoms is well-established. Although some researchers have theorized that the physical health effects of partner violence may be worse for ethnic minority women, there is little research addressing this topic. The current study examined whether African American women demonstrate a differential association in this relationship than Caucasian women. This study included 323 women (232 African American, 91 Caucasian) who participated in a larger investigation of the psychological and psychophysiological correlates of recent partner violence among women seeking help for the abuse. Race was examined as a moderator of the relationship between partner violence frequency and physical health symptoms. Although mean levels of partner violence frequency and physical health symptoms did not significantly differ between African American and Caucasian women, linear regression analyses demonstrated a significant positive relationship between partner violence frequency and physical health symptoms for African American women; whereas there was no association observed between these variables for Caucasian women. Post hoc analyses revealed that posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms partially mediated the association between partner violence frequency and physical health symptoms for the African American women. The current findings underscore the importance of considering race when studying the effect of partner violence on women's health.
    Keywords: Race ; Women ; Partner Violence ; Physical Health ; Moderation
    ISSN: 1942-9681
    E-ISSN: 1942-969X
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 03/2013, Vol.5(2), pp.166-166
    Description: Reports an error in "Differential associations between partner violence and physical health symptoms among Caucasian and African American help-seeking women" by Katherine M. Iverson, Margaret R. Bauer, Jillian C. Shipherd, Suzanne L. Pineles, Ellen F. Harrington and Patricia A. Resick ( Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, Advanced Online Publication, Oct 17, 2011, np). The name of author Margaret R. Bauer was misspelled as Margret R. Bauer. All versions of this article have been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2011-23437-001.) The relationship between partner violence and physical health symptoms is well-established. Although some researchers have theorized that the physical health effects of partner violence may be worse for ethnic minority women, there is little research addressing this topic. The current study examined whether African American women demonstrate a differential association in this relationship than Caucasian women. This study included 323 women (232 African American, 91 Caucasian) who participated in a larger investigation of the psychological and psychophysiological correlates of recent partner violence among women seeking help for the abuse. Race was examined as a moderator of the relationship between partner violence frequency and physical health symptoms. Although mean levels of partner violence frequency and physical health symptoms did not significantly differ between African American and Caucasian women, linear regression analyses demonstrated a significant positive relationship between partner violence frequency and physical health symptoms for African American women; whereas there was no association observed between these variables for Caucasian women. Post hoc analyses revealed that posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms partially mediated the association between partner violence frequency and physical health symptoms for the African American women. The current findings underscore the importance of considering race when studying the effect of partner violence on women's health. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: journal abstract)
    Keywords: Intimate Partner Violence ; Physical Health ; Racial and Ethnic Differences ; Symptoms ; Violence ; Blacks ; Human Females ; Posttraumatic Stress Disorder ; Whites ; Criminal Behavior & Juvenile Delinquency ; Moderation ; Partner Violence ; Physical Health ; Race ; Women ; Posttraumatic Stress Disorder ; Article;
    ISSN: 1942-9681
    E-ISSN: 1942-969X
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