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  • Sharifi, Nasrin  (9)
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Herbal Medicine, June 2017, Vol.8, pp.8-13
    Description: Retained intestinal gas (bloating) and flatulence commonly occur after cesarean section (C-section), leading to complications such as pain and dehiscent sutures. To manage this complication, prescription medications are often used that have potential side effects for both mothers and their infants. The present study evaluated the effect of an herbal medicine, the essential oil of (dill), on the intensity of bloating and flatulence after C-section. A total of 118 eligible women who had delivered via C-section were enrolled in this double blind, placebo-controlled study to receive either dill essential oil (n = 60) or placebo (n = 58). After discontinuation of intravenous fluids, mothers received an oral dose of 40 drops of either dill essential oil (equivalent to 10.8 to 14.8 mg carvone) or a placebo oil, once every 20 min for one hour (i.e. three doses). A visual analogue scale (VAS) form was used to evaluate the intensity of bloating, flatulence and pain at baseline and then at intervals of 20 min after each dose was given. The participant demographics, and values for intensity of flatulence and severity of pain, were comparable between the two groups at baseline. Compared to baseline values, a 33% reduction in intensity of flatulence was reported in the dill group versus a 12% decrease in the placebo group 20 min after the third dose of the intervention had been administered ( = 0.001). Although the rate of the reported severe intestinal pain significantly decreased in both study groups from baseline to the 20 min after the third dose of the intervention, this decrease was approximately three times greater in the dill group (10%) than that of the placebo (3.5%) ( 〈 0.001). Participants did not report any side effects either during or after the study. Dill essential oil was shown to effectively decrease flatulence and relieve intestinal pain after C-section. The results of the study, therefore, suggest that dill essential oil could be safely used to treat post C-section flatulence and abdominal pain as an alternative to prescription medications.
    Keywords: Anethum Graveolens ; Dill ; Flatulence ; Cesarean Section
    ISSN: 2210-8033
    E-ISSN: 22108041
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, August 2017, Vol.88, pp.138-143
    Description: The current study was performed to evaluate the toxicity of L. ( )’s essential oil after 23 days and 45 days of repeated oral administration in female Wistar rats. A total of 80 healthy female Wistar rats were randomly selected and divided into 4 groups. The rats were gavaged with 's essential oil at dose levels of 0, 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg/day. Clinical signs, body weight, hematology, serum biochemistry and organ histopathology were assessed once after 23 days and again after 45 days passed from the start of the intervention. Oral administration of 's essential oil had no observed adverse effects on clinical signs, mortality, body weight, hematology, biochemistry and organ histology (liver, kidneys, spleen and lungs) in a sample of healthy female Wistar rats after 23 days and 45 days from the start of the study. However, an increase in serum levels of alanine transaminase (ALT) was found only at dose level of 1000 mg/kg/d 's essential oil, after the 23-days interval. We conservatively defined the non-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) for 's essential oil as 500 mg/kg/d in female Wistar rats. The present study results should be treated with cautious in terms of the other organs' toxicity.
    Keywords: C. cyminum'S Essential Oil ; Sub Chronic Toxicity ; Wistar Rats ; Pharmacy, Therapeutics, & Pharmacology ; Public Health
    ISSN: 0273-2300
    E-ISSN: 1096-0295
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Iranian Red Crescent medical journal, August 2016, Vol.18(8), pp.e34212
    Description: Limited data are available regarding the effects of combined administration of L. and lime on weight loss and metabolic profiles among subjects with overweight subjects. The current study aimed to assess the effects of combined administration of L. and lime on weight loss and metabolic profiles among subjects with overweight. This randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted on 72 subjects with overweight, aged 18 - 50 years old. Participants were randomly divided into three groups: Group A received high-dose L. and lime capsules (75 mg each, n = 24), group B low-dose L. and lime capsules (25 mg each, n = 24) and group C placebos (n = 24) twice daily for eight weeks. After eight weeks of intervention, compared with low-dose L. plus lime and placebo, taking high-dose L. plus lime resulted in significant weight loss (in the high-dose group: -2.1 ± 1.7 vs. in the low-dose group: -1.2 ± 1.5 and in the placebo group: + 0.2 ± 1.3 kg, respectively; P 〈 0.001) and body mass index (-0.8 ± 0.6 vs. -0.5 ± 0.5 and +0.1 ± 0.5 kg/m, respectively; P 〈 0.001). In addition, administration of high-dose L. plus lime compared with low-dose L. plus lime and placebo, led to a significant reduction in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (P 〈 0.001) and a significant rise in quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) (+ 0.02 ± 0.02 vs. + 0.01 ± 0.02 and 0.01 ± 0.01, respectively; P = 0.01). Moreover, a significant decrease in serum triglycerides (-14.1 ± 56.2 vs. +13.9 ± 36.8 and + 10.6 ± 25.1 mg/dL; respectively; P = 0.03), total-cholesterol (-18.4 ± 28.6 vs. +8.6 ± 28.5 and -1.0 ± 24.8 mg/dL; respectively; P = 0.004) and low density lipoproteins- (LDL)-cholesterol levels (-11.8 ± 20.7 vs. +6.5 ± 23.2 and -2.9 ± 20.4 mg/dL, respectively; P = 0.01) was observed following the consumption of high-dose L. plus lime compared with low-dose L. plus lime and placebo. Results of the current study indicated that taking high-dose L. plus lime for eight weeks among subjects with overweight had beneficial effects on weight, BMI, FPG, QUICKI, triglycerides, total-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels.
    Keywords: Cuminum Cyminum L ; Insulin Resistance ; Lim ; Overweight
    ISSN: 2074-1804
    Source: MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
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  • 4
    In: Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal, 05/23/2016, Vol.18(8)
    Description: BACKGROUND: Limited data are available regarding the effects of combined administration of Cumin cyminum L. and lime on weight loss and metabolic profiles among subjects with overweight subjects.OBJECTIVES: The current study aimed to assess the effects of combined administration of Cumin cyminum L. and lime on weight loss and metabolic profiles among subjects with overweight.PATIENTS AND METHODS: This randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted on 72 subjects with overweight, aged 18 - 50 years old. Participants were randomly divided into three groups: Group A received high-dose Cumin cyminum L. and lime capsules (75 mg each, n = 24), group B low-dose Cumin cyminum L. and lime capsules (25 mg each, n = 24) and group C placebos (n = 24) twice daily for eight weeks.RESULTS: After eight weeks of intervention, compared with low-dose C. cyminum L. plus lime and placebo, taking high-dose C. cyminum L. plus lime resulted in significant weight loss (in the high-dose group: -2.1 ± 1.7 vs. in the low-dose group: -1.2 ± 1.5 and in the placebo group: + 0.2 ± 1.3 kg, respectively; P 〈 0.001) and body mass index (-0.8 ± 0.6 vs. -0.5 ± 0.5 and +0.1 ± 0.5 kg/m2, respectively; P 〈 0.001). In addition, administration of high-dose C. cyminum L. plus lime compared with low-dose C. cyminum L. plus lime and placebo, led to a significant reduction in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (P 〈 0.001) and a significant rise in quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) (+ 0.02 ± 0.02 vs. + 0.01 ± 0.02 and 0.01 ± 0.01, respectively; P = 0.01). Moreover, a significant decrease in serum triglycerides (-14.1 ± 56.2 vs. +13.9 ± 36.8 and + 10.6 ± 25.1 mg/dL; respectively; P = 0.03), total-cholesterol (-18.4 ± 28.6 vs. +8.6 ± 28.5 and -1.0 ± 24.8 mg/dL; respectively; P = 0.004) and low density lipoproteins- (LDL)-cholesterol levels (-11.8 ± 20.7 vs. +6.5 ± 23.2 and -2.9 ± 20.4 mg/dL, respectively; P = 0.01) was observed following the consumption of high-dose C. cyminum L. plus lime compared with low-dose C. cyminum L. plus lime and placebo.CONCLUSIONS: Results of the current study indicated that taking high-dose C. cyminum L. plus lime for eight weeks among subjects with overweight had beneficial effects on weight, BMI, FPG, QUICKI, triglycerides, total-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels.
    Keywords: Medicine;
    ISSN: 2074-1804
    E-ISSN: 2074-1812
    Source: CrossRef
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Lipids, 2016, Vol.51(3), pp.357-357
    Description: To access, purchase, authenticate, or subscribe to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11745-016-4123-3 Byline: Mehri Jamilian (1), Maryam Karamali (2), Mohsen Taghizadeh (3), Nasrin Sharifi (3), Zahra Jafari (3), Mohammad Reza Memarzadeh (4), Mahnaz Mahlouji (4), Zatolla Asemi (3) Keywords: Vitamin D; Evening primrose oil; Supplementation; Gestational diabetes Abstract: Limited data are available assessing the effects of vitamin D and evening primrose oil (EPO) administration on markers of insulin resistance and lipid concentrations in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). This study was designed to evaluate the effects of vitamin D and EPO administration on insulin resistance and lipid concentrations among women with GDM. In this prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, 60 participants with GDM were divided into 2 groups of either 1000 IU vitamin D3 and 1000 mg EPO or placebo for 6 weeks. At the beginning and end of the study, fasting blood samples were obtained from the participants to measure related variables. After 6 weeks of intervention, changes in fasting plasma glucose (-3.6 [+ or -] 7.5 vs. +1.5 [+ or -] 11.4 mg/dL, P = 0.04), serum insulin concentrations (-2.0 [+ or -] 5.3 vs. +4.6 [+ or -] 10.7 A[micro]IU/mL, P = 0.004), homeostasis model of assessment (HOMA) insulin resistance (-0.5 [+ or -] 1.1 vs. +1.1 [+ or -] 2.5, P = 0.003), HOMA-B cell function (-7.7 [+ or -] 23.3 vs. +17.4 [+ or -] 42.9, P = 0.007) and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (+0.01 [+ or -] 0.02 vs. -0.01 [+ or -] 0.02, P = 0.007) in the vitamin D plus EPO group were significantly different from the placebo group. In addition, compared with the placebo, vitamin D and EPO supplementation resulted in significant reductions in serum TAG (-20.0 [+ or -] 54.3 vs. +34.3 [+ or -] 38.2 mg/dL, P 〈 0.001), VLDL (-4.0 [+ or -] 10.9 vs. +6.9 [+ or -] 7.6 mg/dL, P 〈 0.001), TC (-22.1 [+ or -] 32.6 vs. +5.3 [+ or -] 20.1 mg/dL, P 〈 0.001), LDL concentrations (-18.0 [+ or -] 25.5 vs. +1.8 [+ or -] 15.7 mg/dL, P = 0.001) and TC/HDL (-0.3 [+ or -] 0.4 vs. +0.3 [+ or -] 0.5 mg/dL, P 〈 0.001). We did not observe any significant effect of vitamin D and EPO supplementation on serum HDL concentrations. Clinical trial registration number: http://www.irct.ir : IRCT201509115623N52. Author Affiliation: (1) Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, School of Medicine, Arak University of Medical Sciences, Arak, Islamic Republic of Iran (2) Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (3) Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, PO Box 8715988141, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran (4) Barij Medicinal Plants Research Center, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran Article History: Registration Date: 05/01/2016 Received Date: 01/12/2015 Accepted Date: 24/12/2015 Online Date: 19/01/2016 Article note: An erratum to this article can be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11745-016-4138-9.
    Keywords: Vitamin D – Analysis ; Pregnant Women – Diet Therapy ; Pregnant Women – Analysis ; Low Density Lipoproteins – Analysis ; Insulin Resistance – Diet Therapy ; Insulin Resistance – Analysis ; Glycoproteins – Analysis ; Gestational Diabetes – Diet Therapy ; Gestational Diabetes – Analysis ; Medical Schools – Analysis ; Glucose – Analysis;
    ISSN: 0024-4201
    E-ISSN: 1558-9307
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Lipids, 2016, Vol.51(3), pp.349-356
    Description: Limited data are available assessing the effects of vitamin D and evening primrose oil (EPO) administration on markers of insulin resistance and lipid concentrations in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). This study was designed to evaluate the effects of vitamin D and EPO administration on insulin resistance and lipid concentrations among women with GDM. In this prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, 60 participants with GDM were divided into 2 groups of either 1000 IU vitamin D3 and 1000 mg EPO or placebo for 6 weeks. At the beginning and end of the study, fasting blood samples were obtained from the participants to measure related variables. After 6 weeks of intervention, changes in fasting plasma glucose (−3.6 ± 7.5 vs. +1.5 ± 11.4 mg/dL, P  = 0.04), serum insulin concentrations (−2.0 ± 5.3 vs. +4.6 ± 10.7 µIU/mL, P  = 0.004), homeostasis model of assessment (HOMA) insulin resistance (−0.5 ± 1.1 vs. +1.1 ± 2.5, P  = 0.003), HOMA-B cell function (−7.7 ± 23.3 vs. +17.4 ± 42.9, P  = 0.007) and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (+0.01 ± 0.02 vs. −0.01 ± 0.02, P  = 0.007) in the vitamin D plus EPO group were significantly different from the placebo group. In addition, compared with the placebo, vitamin D and EPO supplementation resulted in significant reductions in serum TAG (−20.0 ± 54.3 vs. +34.3 ± 38.2 mg/dL, P  〈 0.001), VLDL (−4.0 ± 10.9 vs. +6.9 ± 7.6 mg/dL, P  〈 0.001), TC (−22.1 ± 32.6 vs. +5.3 ± 20.1 mg/dL, P  〈 0.001), LDL concentrations (−18.0 ± 25.5 vs. +1.8 ± 15.7 mg/dL, P  = 0.001) and TC/HDL (−0.3 ± 0.4 vs. +0.3 ± 0.5 mg/dL, P  〈 0.001). We did not observe any significant effect of vitamin D and EPO supplementation on serum HDL concentrations. Clinical trial registration number : http://www.irct.ir : IRCT201509115623N52.
    Keywords: Vitamin D ; Evening primrose oil ; Supplementation ; Gestational diabetes
    ISSN: 0024-4201
    E-ISSN: 1558-9307
    Source: Springer Science & Business Media B.V.
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: High Blood Pressure & Cardiovascular Prevention, 2018, Vol.25(1), pp.41-50
    Description: Although several trials have assessed the effect of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on blood pressures among patients with metabolic diseases, findings are controversial. This review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed to summarize the evidence on the effects of CoQ10 supplementation on blood pressures among patients with metabolic diseases. Randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) published in PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science and Cochrane Library databases up to 10 August 2017 were searched. Two review authors independently assessed study eligibility, extracted data, and evaluated risk of bias of included studies. Heterogeneity was measured with a Q-test and with I statistics. Data were pooled by using the fix or random-effect model based on the heterogeneity test results and expressed as standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI). A total of seventeen randomized controlled trials (684 participants) were included. Results showed that CoQ10 supplementation significantly decreased systolic blood pressure (SBP) (SMD - 0.30; 95% CI - 0.52, - 0.08). However, CoQ10 supplementation decreased diastolic blood pressure (DBP), but this was not statistically significant (SMD - 0.08; 95% CI - 0.46, 0.29). CoQ10 supplementation may result in reduction in SBP levels, but did not affect DBP levels among patients with metabolic diseases. Additional prospective studies regarding the effect of CoQ10 supplementation on blood pressure in patients with metabolic diseases are necessary.
    Keywords: Coenzyme Q10 ; Blood pressure ; Metabolic diseases ; Meta-analysis
    ISSN: 1120-9879
    E-ISSN: 1179-1985
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Iranian journal of kidney diseases, November 2017, Vol.11(6), pp.438-446
    Description: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of mulberry extract administration on markers of insulin metabolism, lipid concentrations, and biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN). Sixty patients were randomly allocated into 2 groups to receive either 300 mg/d of mulberry extract (n = 30) or placebo (n = 30), twice per day for 12 weeks. Fasting blood samples were taken at the onset of the study and 12 weeks after supplementation to examine markers of insulin metabolism, lipid concentrations, and biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress. Mulberry extract, compared to placebo, resulted in significant reductions in serum triglycerides (-37.3 ± 64.7 mg/dL versus 3.0 ± 78.8 mg/dL, P = .03) and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (-7.4 ± 12.9 mg/dL versus 0.6 ± 15.8 mg/dL, P = .03), and a significant increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration (0.5 ± 4.0 mg/dL versus -2.0 ± 5.0 mg/dL, P = .03). Other significant changes were in serum high-sensitivity C-reaction protein (-2.3 ± 4.5 µg/mL versus -0.1 ± 2.2 µg/mL, P = .02), plasma glutathione (87.8 ± 159.7 µmol/L versus -24.2 ± 138.8 µmol/L, P = .005) and malondialdehyde (-0.03 ± 0.5 µmol/L versus 0.7 ± 1.0 µmol/L, P 〈 .001).   Conclusions. These findings showed that mulberry extract administration had favorable effects on serum lipids, HSCRP, glutathione, and malondialdehyde levels in DN patients; however, it did not affect markers of insulin metabolism or biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress.
    Keywords: Dietary Supplements ; Insulin Resistance ; Morus ; Diabetic Nephropathies -- Drug Therapy ; Inflammation Mediators -- Blood ; Insulin -- Blood ; Lipids -- Blood ; Oxidative Stress -- Drug Effects ; Plant Extracts -- Therapeutic Use
    ISSN: 17358582
    E-ISSN: 1735-8604
    Source: MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
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  • 9
    In: Phytotherapy Research, July 2019, Vol.33(7), pp.1943-1951
    Description: This study compared the effects of flaxseed and fish oil supplementation on cardiovascular risk parameters in diabetic patients with coronary heart disease. Participants were randomly allocated into three intervention groups to receive either 1,000 mg of omega‐3 fatty acids from fish oil or 1,000 mg of omega‐3 fatty acids from flaxseed oil or placebo ( = 30 each group) twice a day for 12 weeks. A significant reduction in insulin levels (.04) was observed following flaxseed oil and fish oil supplementation compared with the placebo. In addition, a significant reduction in high‐sensitivity C‐reactive protein (.02) was seen after flaxseed oil supplementation compared with the placebo and a significant increase in total nitrite (.001) was seen after flaxseed oil and fish oil intake compared with placebo. Additionally, a significant increase in total antioxidant capacity ( 〈 .001) after consuming flaxseed oil and fish oil compared with placebo and glutathione levels (.001) after consuming fish oil compared with flaxseed oil and placebo was observed. Overall, our study revealed the beneficial effects of flaxseed oil and fish oil supplementation on few metabolic profiles. This study suggests that the effect of flaxseed oil in reducing insulin and increasing total nitrite and total antioxidant capacity is similar to fish oil.
    Keywords: Coronary Heart Disease ; Fish Oil ; Flaxseed Oil ; Metabolic Status ; Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
    ISSN: 0951-418X
    E-ISSN: 1099-1573
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