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  • Van Der Pol, Barbara  (6)
  • Chlamydia Trachomatis
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 2012, Vol.7(5), p.e36298
    Description: Lactobacillus- dominated vaginal microbiotas are associated with reproductive health and STI resistance in women, whereas altered microbiotas are associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV), STI risk and poor reproductive outcomes. Putative vaginal taxa have been observed in male first-catch urine, urethral swab and coronal sulcus (CS) specimens but the significance of these observations is unclear. We used 16 S rRNA sequencing to characterize the microbiota of the CS and urine collected from 18 adolescent men over three consecutive months. CS microbiotas of most participants were more stable than their urine microbiotas and the composition of CS microbiotas were strongly influenced by circumcision. BV-associated taxa, including Atopobium , Megasphaera , Mobiluncus , Prevotella and Gemella , were detected in CS specimens from sexually experienced and inexperienced participants. In contrast, urine primarily contained taxa that were not abundant in CS specimens. Lactobacilllus and Streptococcus were major urine taxa but their abundance was inversely correlated. In contrast, Sneathia , Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma were only found in urine from sexually active participants. Thus, the CS and urine support stable and distinct bacterial communities. Finally, our results suggest that the penis and the urethra can be colonized by a variety of BV-associated taxa and that some of these colonizations result from partnered sexual activity.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology ; Medicine ; Public Health And Epidemiology ; Infectious Diseases ; Microbiology ; Urology
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of infectious diseases, 01 January 2010, Vol.201(1), pp.42-51
    Description: Repeated Chlamydia trachomatis infections are common among young sexually active women. The relative frequency of reinfection and antibiotic treatment failure is undefined. Adolescent women enrolled in a longitudinal cohort had behavioral and sexually transmitted infection assessments performed every 3 months, including amplification tests for C. trachomatis, ompA genotyping, and interviews and diary entries to document sex partner-specific coitus and event-specific condom use. Repeated infections were classified as reinfection or treatment failure by use of an algorithm. All infections for which treatment outcomes were known were used to estimate the effectiveness of antibiotic use. We observed 478 episodes of infection among 210 study participants; 176 women remained uninfected. The incidence rate was 34 episodes/100 woman-years. Of the women who were infected, 121 experienced 1 repeated infections, forming 268 episode pairs; 183 pairs had complete data available and were classified using the algorithm. Of the repeated infections, 84.2% were definite, probable, or possible reinfections; 13.7% were probable or possible treatment failures; and 2.2% persisted without documented treatment. For 318 evaluable infections, we estimated 92.2% effectiveness of antibiotic use. Most repeated chlamydial infections in this high-incidence cohort were reinfections, but repeated infections resulting from treatment failures occurred as well. Our results have implications for male screening and partner notification programs and suggest the need for improved antibiotic therapies.
    Keywords: Anti-Bacterial Agents -- Therapeutic Use ; Azithromycin -- Therapeutic Use ; Chlamydia Infections -- Drug Therapy
    ISSN: 00221899
    E-ISSN: 1537-6613
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  • 3
    In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 2016, Vol.43(12), pp.741-749
    Description: BACKGROUND: Sexual transmission rates of Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) cannot be measured directly; however, the study of concordance of Ct infection in sexual partnerships (dyads) can help to illuminate factors influencing Ct transmission. METHODS: Heterosexual men and women with Ct infection and their sex partners were enrolled and partner-specific coital and behavioral data collected for the prior 30 days. Microbiological data included Ct culture, and nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT), quantitative Ct polymerase chain reaction, and ompA genotyping. We measured Ct concordance in dyads and factors (correlates) associated with concordance. RESULTS: One hundred twenty-one women and 125 men formed 128 dyads. Overall, 72.9% of male partners of NAAT-positive women and 68.6% of female partners of NAAT-positive men were Ct-infected. Concordance was more common in dyads with culture-positive members (78.6% of male partners, 77% of female partners). Partners of women and men who were NAAT-positive only had lower concordance (33.3%, 46.4%, respectively). Women in concordant dyads had significantly higher median endocervical quantitative Ct polymerase chain reaction values (3,032) compared with CT-infected women in discordant dyads (1013 inclusion forming units DNA equivalents per mL; P 〈 0.01). Among 54 Ct-concordant dyads with ompA genotype data for both members, 96.2% had identical genotypes. CONCLUSIONS: Higher organism load appears associated with concordance among women. Same-genotype chlamydial concordance was high in sexual partnerships. No behavioral factors were sufficiently discriminating to guide partner services activities. Findings may help model coitus-specific transmission probabilities.
    Keywords: Chlamydia Infections -- Genetic Aspects ; Chlamydia Infections -- Development And Progression ; Virulence (Microbiology) -- Genetic Aspects ; Genotypes -- Health Aspects ; Disease Susceptibility -- Genetic Aspects;
    ISSN: 0148-5717
    E-ISSN: 15374521
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 2016, p.1
    ISSN: 0148-5717
    Source: Wolters Kluwer - Ovid - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins (via CrossRef)
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  • 5
    In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 1996, Vol.23(3), pp.226-229
    Description: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:: GOALS:: STUDY DESIGN:: The study population consisted of all 4,329 sexually active girls between the ages of 13 and 19 attending the four adolescent health clinics in Indianapolis, Indiana, during the period beginning October 1, 1985, and ending June 30, 1994. All girls were cultured for Chlamydia trachomatis, and behavioral data were collected for those attending the clinics before 1989. The trend in quarterly isolation rates was examined using linear regression analysis. RESULTS:: Results showed that there was a significant decrease (P = 0.0001), from 25.9% to 9.7%, in the first-visit chlamydial isolation rate over the study period. Behavioral data showed decreases in the frequency of sexual intercourse and in lifetime years of sexual activity, as well as an increase in condom use. CONCLUSIONS::
    Keywords: Chlamydia Infections ; Demographic Aspects ; Teenage Girls ; Health Aspects ; Medicine;
    ISSN: 0148-5717
    E-ISSN: 15374521
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Adolescent Health, 2007, Vol.40(5), pp.412-417
    Description: is a possible sexually transmitted pathogen and its study among the adolescent age group has been limited. In this longitudinal study, the epidemiology, natural history, and associated clinical findings of among adolescents in a primary care setting were explored. A sample of 383 young women (14–17 years of age) and 117 male partners provided sexual behavior data and urogenital samples for polymerase chain reaction testing to detect , , and other sexually transmitted infections. Women were tested quarterly for up to 27 months and, during every other quarter, tested weekly. The presence of any signs or symptoms of infection among the female subjects was also documented. Cumulatively, 13.6% (52/383) of women tested positive for . All women with , except one, were sexually experienced. was associated with number of sexual partners ( 〈 .001) and infection ( 〈 .03). was more likely among male partners of -positive women ( 〈 .02); 31.3% of untreated cases had infection lasting over 8 weeks. was not associated with the presence of clinical signs or symptoms of infection. Findings support sexual transmissibility of and add to understanding of natural history and clinical findings.
    Keywords: Mycoplasma Genitalium ; Chlamydia Trachomatis ; Sexually Transmitted Diseases ; Epidemiology ; Adolescent ; Polymerase Chain Reaction ; Medicine ; Social Welfare & Social Work
    ISSN: 1054-139X
    E-ISSN: 1879-1972
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