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Berlin Brandenburg

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  • 1
    In: Water Resources Research, May 2014, Vol.50(5), pp.4514-4529
    Description: A major difficulty in modeling multiphase flow in porous media is the emergence of trapped phases. Our experiments demonstrate that gas can be trapped in either single‐pores, multipores, or in large connected networks. These large connected clusters can comprise up to eight grain volumes and can contain up to 50% of the whole trapped gas volume. About 85% of the gas volume is trapped by gas clusters. This variety of possible trapped gas clusters of different shape and volume will lead to a better process understanding of bubble‐mediated mass transfer. Since multipore gas bubbles are in contact with the solid surface through ultrathin adsorbed water films the interfacial area between trapped gas clusters and intergranular capillary water is only about 80% of the total gas surface. We could derive a significant (R = 0.98) linear relationship between the gas‐water‐interface and gas saturation. We found no systematic dependency of the front velocity of the invading water phase in the velocity range from 0.1 to 0.6 cm/min corresponding to capillary numbers from 2 × 10 to 10. Our experimental results indicate that the capillary trapping mechanism is controlled by the local pore structure and local connectivity and not by thermodynamics, i.e., by the minimum of the , at least in the considered velocity range. Consistent with this physical picture is our finding that the trapping frequency (= bubble‐size distribution) reflects the pore size distribution for the whole range of pore radii, i.e., the capillary trapping process is determined by statistics and not by thermodynamics. No systematic dependency of trapping efficiency on capillary number Majority of trapped gas bubbles (85%) are multipore trapped Trapping of gas clusters is determined by statistics and not by thermodynamics
    Keywords: Gas Clusters ; Capillary Trapping ; Interfacial Area
    ISSN: 0043-1397
    E-ISSN: 1944-7973
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  • 2
    In: Geoarchaeology, July 2015, Vol.30(4), pp.369-378
    Description: Roman cisterns served as rainwater storage devices for centuries and are densely distributed in parts of northern Jordan. A major earthquake hit the region . A.D. 750 and in a short time many settlements were abandoned. As a consequence, most cisterns were not maintained, and they filled with sediments that today provide a postabandonment depositional record. In two field surveys, we mapped the locations of more than 100 cisterns in the Wadi Al‐Arab basin and selected two for detailed stratigraphic analysis that included C and optically stimulated luminescence dating. Catchment basin area for each cistern was determined by differential GPS. Both cisterns filled with sediments after the great earthquake and consequent abandonment of the region. Calculated sediment volumes are translated to long‐term average sediment export rates of 2.6–6.6 t haa, which are comparable to erosion and sediment yield rates from other studies within the Mediterranean region. Our pilot study suggests that this approach can be applied elsewhere to calculate long‐term sediment export rates on hill slopes containing relict cisterns.
    Keywords: Quaternary Geology ; Sedimentary Petrology ; Arid Environment ; Asia ; Cenozoic ; Chronostratigraphy ; Clay Minerals ; Climate Change ; Climatic Controls ; Dates ; Depositional Environment ; Desertification ; Drainage Basins ; Erodibility ; Erosion ; Erosion Rates ; Holocene ; Human Activity ; Human Ecology ; Hydrology ; Jordan ; Jordan River ; Land Use ; Mediterranean Region ; Middle Ages ; Middle East ; Optically Stimulated Luminescence ; Paleogeography ; Permeability ; Quaternary ; Rainfall ; Reconstruction ; Roman Period ; Sediment Yield ; Sedimentation ; Sheet Silicates ; Silicates ; Soil Erosion ; Stratigraphy ; Terrestrial Environment ; Upper Holocene ; Urban Environment ; Wadi Al-Arab ; Water Resources;
    ISSN: 0883-6353
    E-ISSN: 1520-6548
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  • 3
    In: Water Resources Research, June 2017, Vol.53(6), pp.4709-4724
    Description: The relaxation dynamics toward a hydrostatic equilibrium after a change in phase saturation in porous media is governed by fluid reconfiguration at the pore scale. Little is known whether a hydrostatic equilibrium in which all interfaces come to rest is ever reached and which microscopic processes govern the time scales of relaxation. Here we apply fast synchrotron‐based X‐ray tomography (X‐ray CT) to measure the slow relaxation dynamics of fluid interfaces in a glass bead pack after fast drainage of the sample. The relaxation of interfaces triggers internal redistribution of fluids, reduces the surface energy stored in the fluid interfaces, and relaxes the contact angle toward the equilibrium value while the fluid topology remains unchanged. The equilibration of capillary pressures occurs in two stages: (i) a quick relaxation within seconds in which most of the pressure drop that built up during drainage is dissipated, a process that is to fast to be captured with fast X‐ray CT, and (ii) a slow relaxation with characteristic time scales of 1–4 h which manifests itself as a spontaneous imbibition process that is well described by the Washburn equation for capillary rise in porous media. The slow relaxation implies that a hydrostatic equilibrium is hardly ever attained in practice when conducting two‐phase experiments in which a flux boundary condition is changed from flow to no‐flow. Implications for experiments with pressure boundary conditions are discussed. What happens to fluids in a porous medium after pumping is stopped? Fast X‐ray tomography shows that even in a sample smaller than a sugar cube fluid interfaces continue to move for hours until an optimal fluid configuration is reached. The pace is limited by slow relaxation of dynamic contact angles. Therefore hydrostatic equilibrium, which is the state at which all fluid interfaces come to rest, is hardly ever attained in practice when conducting two‐phase flow experiments where the flow is stopped in much larger soil or rock samples. Relaxation dynamics through internal redistribution of fluids after fast drainage occurs in two stages A quick dissipation within seconds is followed by slow relaxation within several hours due to relaxation of dynamic contact angles Fluid configurations during relaxation are very different from those during quasi‐static drainage and imbibition
    Keywords: Two‐Phase Flow ; Dynamic Effects ; Hydraulic Nonequilibrium ; Dynamic Contact Angle ; Fluid Configuration ; Fluid Topology
    ISSN: 0043-1397
    E-ISSN: 1944-7973
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  • 4
    In: Water Resources Research, March 2007, Vol.43(3), pp.n/a-n/a
    Description: Large‐scale models of transient flow processes in the unsaturated zone require, in general, upscaling of the flow problem in order to capture the impact of heterogeneities on a small scale, which cannot be resolved by the model. Effective parameters for the upscaled models are often derived from second‐order stochastic properties of the parameter fields. Such properties are good quantifications for parameter fields, which are multi‐Gaussian. However, the structure of soil does rarely resemble these kinds of fields. The non‐multi‐Gaussian field properties can lead to strong discrepancies between predictions of upscaled models and the averaged real flow process. In particular, the connected paths of parameter ranges of the medium are important features, which are usually not taken into account in stochastic approaches. They are determined here by the Euler number of one‐cut indicator fields. Methods to predict effective parameters are needed that incorporate this type of information. We discuss different simple and fast approaches for estimating the effective parameter for upscaled models of slow transient flow processes in the unsaturated zone, where connected paths of the material may be taken into account. Upscaled models are derived with the assumption of capillary equilibrium. The effective parameters are calculated using effective media approaches. We also discuss the limits of the applicability of these methods.
    Keywords: Richards Equation ; Unsaturated Flow ; Upscaling
    ISSN: 0043-1397
    E-ISSN: 1944-7973
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  • 5
    In: Water Resources Research, April 2009, Vol.45(4), pp.n/a-n/a
    Description: High‐resolution optical bench‐scale experiments were conducted in order to investigate local gas flow pattern and integral flow properties caused by point‐like gas injection into water‐saturated glass beads. The main goal of this study was to test the validity of the continuum approach for two‐fluid flow in macroscopic homogeneous media. Analyzing the steady state experimental gas flow pattern that satisfies the necessary coherence condition by image processing and calibrating the optical gas distribution by the gravimetrical gas saturation, it was found that a pulse‐like function yields the best fit for the lateral gas saturation profile. This strange behavior of a relatively sharp saturation transition is in contradiction to the widely anticipated picture of a smooth Gaussian‐like transition, which is obtained by the continuum approach. This transition is caused by the channelized flow structure, and it turns out that only a narrow range of capillary pressure is realized by the system, whereas the continuum approach assumes that within the representative elementary volume the whole spectrum of capillary pressures can be realized. It was found that the stochastical hypothesis proposed by Selker et al. (2007) that bridges pore scale and continuum scale is supported by the experiments. In order to study channelized gas flow on the pore scale, a variational treatment, which minimizes the free energy of an undulating capillary, was carried out. On the basis of thermodynamical arguments the geometric form of a microcapillary, macrochannel formation and a length‐scale‐dependent transition in gas flow pattern from coherent to incoherent flow are discussed.
    Keywords: Air Sparging ; Continuum Modeling ; Pore‐Scale Modeling ; Gas Flow Pattern ; Instability Analysis ; Image Processing
    ISSN: 0043-1397
    E-ISSN: 1944-7973
    Source: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Permafrost and Periglacial Processes, July 2005, Vol.16(3), pp.277-290
    Description: Minkowski densities and density functions are measures for quantifying arbitrary binary patterns. They are employed here to describe permafrost patterns obtained from aerial photographs. We demonstrate that images taken at two neighbouring sites shown distinctly different patterns and quantify the difference. It is found that one of the sites exhibits an essentially single‐scale structure while the other one has a multiscale organization. Minkowski densities and density functions are thus proposed as sensitive and objective measures to quantify the change of permafrost patterns in space or in time. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Keywords: Permafrost ; Patterned Ground ; Density Functions
    ISSN: 1045-6740
    E-ISSN: 1099-1530
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union, 11/25/2008, Vol.89(48), pp.490-490
    Description: Both soil science and hydrology are at a critical threshold of exploring breakthroughs. Synergies are expected by bridging classical pedology with soil physics, hydrology, geomorphology, and other related bio‐ and geo‐sciences to address complex soil and water interactions across spatiotemporal scales. Holistic study of the Earth's critical zone (i.e., the critical interface between the surficial solid Earth and its fluid envelopes, which ranges from the top of vegetation to the bottom of aquifers) demands interdisciplinary systems approaches to tackle a wide array of environmental, ecological, agricultural, geological, and natural resource issues of societal importance. In this spirit, and aiming to advance the emerging field of hydropedology, the first international conference on hydropedology was held at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) with the theme “Water and Soil: Key to Sustaining the Earth's Critical Zone.” The International Union of Soil Sciences' Working Group on Hydropedology organized this meeting, with main sponsorships from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Research Initiative and Penn State.
    ISSN: Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union
    E-ISSN: 00963941
    E-ISSN: 23249250
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  • 8
    In: Water Resources Research, May 2006, Vol.42(5), pp.n/a-n/a
    Description: This paper presents a vision that advocates hydropedology as an advantageous integration of pedology and hydrology for studying the intimate relationships between soil, landscape, and hydrology. Landscape water flux is suggested as a unifying precept for hydropedology, through which pedologic and hydrologic expertise can be better integrated. Landscape water flux here encompasses the source, storage, flux, pathway, residence time, availability, and spatiotemporal distribution of water in the root and deep vadose zones within the landscape. After illustrating multiple knowledge gaps that can be addressed by the synergistic integration of pedology and hydrology, we suggest five scientific hypotheses that are critical to advancing hydropedology and enhancing the prediction of landscape water flux. We then present interlinked strategies for achieving the stated vision. It is our hope that by working together, hydrologists and pedologists, along with scientists in related disciplines, can better guide data acquisition, knowledge integration, and model‐based prediction so as to advance the hydrologic sciences in the next decade and beyond.
    Keywords: Catchment Hydrology ; Landscape Processes ; Scale ; Soil Hydrology ; Soil Physics ; Vadose Zone
    ISSN: 0043-1397
    E-ISSN: 1944-7973
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