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  • Article  (9)
  • Vogel, Jorg  (9)
  • Westermann, Alexander J.  (9)
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  • Article  (9)
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 27 June 2017, Vol.114(26), pp.6824-6829
    Description: The functions of many bacterial RNA-binding proteins remain obscure because of a lack of knowledge of their cellular ligands. Although well-studied cold-shock protein A (CspA) family members are induced and function at low temperature, others are highly expressed in infection-relevant conditions. Here, we have profiled transcripts bound in vivo by the CspA family members of serovar Typhimurium to link the constitutively expressed CspC and CspE proteins with virulence pathways. Phenotypic assays in vitro demonstrated a crucial role for these proteins in membrane stress, motility, and biofilm formation. Moreover, double deletion of and fully attenuates in systemic mouse infection. In other words, the RNA ligand-centric approach taken here overcomes a problematic molecular redundancy of CspC and CspE that likely explains why these proteins have evaded selection in previous virulence factor screens in animals. Our results highlight RNA-binding proteins as regulators of pathogenicity and potential targets of antimicrobial therapy. They also suggest that globally acting RNA-binding proteins are more common in bacteria than currently appreciated.
    Keywords: RNA-Binding Protein ; Salmonella ; Bacterial Pathogenesis ; Cold-Shock Protein ; Stress Response ; Bacterial Proteins ; Cold Shock Proteins and Peptides ; Heat-Shock Proteins ; RNA-Binding Proteins ; Salmonella Infections ; Salmonella Typhimurium ; Virulence Factors
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences, 05 November 2016, Vol.371(1707)
    Description: Infection is a complicated balance, with both pathogen and host struggling to tilt the result in their favour. Bacterial infection biology has relied on forward genetics for many of its advances, defining phenotype in terms of replication in model systems. However, many known virulence factors fail to produce robust phenotypes, particularly in the systems most amenable to genetic manipulation, such as cell-culture models. This has particularly been limiting for the study of the bacterial regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) in infection. We argue that new sequencing-based technologies can work around this problem by providing a 'molecular phenotype', defined in terms of the specific transcriptional dysregulation in the infection system induced by gene deletion. We illustrate this using the example of our recent study of the PinT sRNA using dual RNA-seq, that is, simultaneous RNA sequencing of host and pathogen during infection. We additionally discuss how other high-throughput technologies, in particular genetic interaction mapping using transposon insertion sequencing, may be used to further dissect molecular phenotypes. We propose a strategy for how high-throughput technologies can be integrated in the study of non-coding regulators as well as bacterial virulence factors, enhancing our ability to rapidly generate hypotheses with regards to their function.This article is part of the themed issue 'The new bacteriology'.
    Keywords: Pint ; Tn-Seq ; Dual RNA-Seq ; Host–Pathogen Interaction ; Infection ; Small Non-Coding RNA ; Chromosome Mapping -- Methods ; High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing -- Methods ; RNA, Bacterial -- Genetics ; RNA, Small Untranslated -- Genetics ; Sequence Analysis, RNA -- Methods
    ISSN: 09628436
    E-ISSN: 1471-2970
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Science (New York, N.Y.), 07 December 2018, Vol.362(6419), pp.1156-1160
    Description: Many bacterial infections are hard to treat and tend to relapse, possibly due to the presence of antibiotic-tolerant persisters. In vitro, persister cells appear to be dormant. After uptake of species by macrophages, nongrowing persisters also occur, but their physiological state is poorly understood. In this work, we show that persisters arising during macrophage infection maintain a metabolically active state. Persisters reprogram macrophages by means of effectors secreted by the pathogenicity island 2 type 3 secretion system. These effectors dampened proinflammatory innate immune responses and induced anti-inflammatory macrophage polarization. Such reprogramming allowed nongrowing cells to survive for extended periods in their host. Persisters undermining host immune defenses might confer an advantage to the pathogen during relapse once antibiotic pressure is relieved.
    Keywords: Drug Resistance, Bacterial ; Host-Pathogen Interactions -- Immunology ; Macrophages -- Immunology ; Salmonella Infections -- Drug Therapy ; Salmonella Typhimurium -- Metabolism ; Type III Secretion Systems -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 00368075
    E-ISSN: 1095-9203
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Nature, 28 January 2016, Vol.529(7587), pp.496-501
    Description: Bacteria express many small RNAs for which the regulatory roles in pathogenesis have remained poorly understood due to a paucity of robust phenotypes in standard virulence assays. Here we use a generic 'dual RNA-seq' approach to profile RNA expression simultaneously in pathogen and host during Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection and reveal the molecular impact of bacterial riboregulators. We identify a PhoP-activated small RNA, PinT, which upon bacterial internalization temporally controls the expression of both invasion-associated effectors and virulence genes required for intracellular survival. This riboregulatory activity causes pervasive changes in coding and noncoding transcripts of the host. Interspecies correlation analysis links PinT to host cell JAK-STAT signalling, and we identify infection-specific alterations in multiple long noncoding RNAs. Our study provides a paradigm for a sensitive RNA-based analysis of intracellular bacterial pathogens and their hosts without physical separation, as well as a new discovery route for hidden functions of pathogen genes.
    Keywords: Gene Expression Regulation -- Genetics ; Host-Pathogen Interactions -- Genetics ; RNA, Bacterial -- Genetics ; RNA, Untranslated -- Genetics ; Salmonella Typhimurium -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00280836
    E-ISSN: 1476-4687
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  • 5
    In: Nature Reviews Microbiology, 2012, Vol.10(9), p.618
    Description: A comprehensive understanding of host-pathogen interactions requires a knowledge of the associated gene expression changes in both the pathogen and the host. Traditional, probe-dependent approaches using microarrays or reverse transcription PCR typically require the pathogen and host cells to be physically separated before gene expression analysis. However, the development of the probe-independent RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) approach has begun to revolutionize transcriptomics. Here, we assess the feasibility of taking transcriptomics one step further by performing 'dual RNA-seq', in which gene expression changes in both the pathogen and the host are analysed simultaneously.
    Keywords: Host-Pathogen Interactions ; Gene Expression Profiling -- Methods ; Sequence Analysis, RNA -- Methods;
    ISSN: 1740-1526
    E-ISSN: 17401534
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  • 6
    In: PLoS Pathogens, 2017, Vol.13(2)
    Description: The transcriptome is a powerful proxy for the physiological state of a cell, healthy or diseased. As a result, transcriptome analysis has become a key tool in understanding the molecular changes that accompany bacterial infections of eukaryotic cells. Until recently, such transcriptomic studies have been technically limited to analyzing mRNA expression changes in either the bacterial pathogen or the infected eukaryotic host cell. However, the increasing sensitivity of high-throughput RNA sequencing now enables “dual RNA-seq” studies, simultaneously capturing all classes of coding and noncoding transcripts in both the pathogen and the host. In the five years since the concept of dual RNA-seq was introduced, the technique has been applied to a range of infection models. This has not only led to a better understanding of the physiological changes in pathogen and host during the course of an infection but has also revealed hidden molecular phenotypes of virulence-associated small noncoding RNAs that were not visible in standard infection assays. Here, we use the knowledge gained from these recent studies to suggest experimental and computational guidelines for the design of future dual RNA-seq studies. We conclude this review by discussing prospective applications of the technique.
    Keywords: Review ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Research And Analysis Methods ; Medicine And Health Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Medicine And Health Sciences ; Medicine And Health Sciences ; Medicine And Health Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Medicine And Health Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Research And Analysis Methods
    ISSN: 1553-7366
    E-ISSN: 1553-7374
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: BMC genomics, 19 April 2015, Vol.16, pp.323
    Description: The interaction of eukaryotic host and prokaryotic pathogen cells is linked to specific changes in the cellular proteome, and consequently to infection-related gene expression patterns of the involved cells. To simultaneously assess the transcriptomes of both organisms during their interaction we developed dual 3'Seq, a tag-based sequencing protocol that allows for exact quantification of differentially expressed transcripts in interacting pro- and eukaryotic cells without prior fixation or physical disruption of the interaction. Human epithelial cells were infected with Salmonella enterica Typhimurium as a model system for invasion of the intestinal epithelium, and the transcriptional response of the infected host cells together with the differential expression of invading and intracellular pathogen cells was determined by dual 3'Seq coupled with the next-generation sequencing-based transcriptome profiling technique deepSuperSAGE (deep Serial Analysis of Gene Expression). Annotation to reference transcriptomes comprising the operon structure of the employed S. enterica Typhimurium strain allowed for in silico separation of the interacting cells including quantification of polycistronic RNAs. Eighty-nine percent of the known loci are found to be transcribed in prokaryotic cells prior or subsequent to infection of the host, while 75% of all protein-coding loci are represented in the polyadenylated transcriptomes of human host cells. Dual 3'Seq was alternatively coupled to MACE (Massive Analysis of cDNA ends) to assess the advantages and drawbacks of a library preparation procedure that allows for sequencing of longer fragments. Additionally, the identified expression patterns of both organisms were validated by qRT-PCR using three independent biological replicates, which confirmed that RELB along with NFKB1 and NFKB2 are involved in the initial immune response of epithelial cells after infection with S. enterica Typhimurium.
    Keywords: Host-Pathogen Interactions -- Genetics ; Salmonella Infections, Animal -- Genetics ; Salmonella Typhi -- Genetics ; Transcriptome -- Genetics
    E-ISSN: 1471-2164
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: PLoS Genetics, 01 June 2018, Vol.14(6), p.e1007401
    Description: Invasion of epithelial cells by Salmonella enterica requires expression of genes located in the pathogenicity island I (SPI-1). The expression of SPI-1 genes is very tightly regulated and activated only under specific conditions. Most studies have focused on the regulatory pathways that induce...
    Keywords: Biology
    ISSN: 1553-7390
    E-ISSN: 1553-7404
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: PLoS Pathogens, 2016, Vol. 12(6)
    Description: Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Tm) is a common cause of self-limiting diarrhea. The mucosal inflammation is thought to arise from a standoff between the pathogen's virulence factors and the host's mucosal innate immune defenses, particularly the mucosal NAIP/NLRC4 inflammasome. However, it had remained unclear how this switches the gut from homeostasis to inflammation. This was studied using the streptomycin mouse model. S. Tm infections in knockout mice, cytokine inhibition and -injection experiments revealed that caspase-1 (not -11) dependent IL-18 is pivotal for inducing acute inflammation. IL-18 boosted NK cell chemoattractants and enhanced the NK cells' migratory capacity, thus promoting mucosal accumulation of mature, activated NK cells. NK cell depletion and Prf(-/-) ablation (but not granulocyte-depletion or T-cell deficiency) delayed tissue inflammation. Our data suggest an NK cell perforin response as one limiting factor in mounting gut mucosal inflammation. Thus, IL-18-elicited NK cell perforin responses seem to be critical for coordinating mucosal inflammation during early infection, when S. Tm strongly relies on virulence factors detectable by the inflammasome. This may have broad relevance for mucosal defense against microbial pathogens.
    Keywords: Medical And Health Sciences ; Clinical Medicine ; Infectious Medicine ; Medicin Och Hälsovetenskap ; Klinisk Medicin ; Infektionsmedicin ; Medical And Health Sciences ; Basic Medicine ; Microbiology In The Medical Area ; Medicin Och Hälsovetenskap ; Medicinska Och Farmaceutiska Grundvetenskaper ; Mikrobiologi Inom Det Medicinska Området
    ISSN: 1553-7366
    E-ISSN: 15537374
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