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  • Wiemers, Martin  (8)
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: ZooKeys, Jan 6, 2014, Issue 367, p.65(20)
    Description: Detailed information on species' ecological niche characteristics that can be related to declines and extinctions is indispensable for a better understanding of the relationship between the occurrence and performance of wild species and their environment and, moreover, for an improved assessment of the impacts of global change. Knowledge on species characteristics such as habitat requirements is already available in the ecological literature for butterflies, but information about their climatic requirements is still lacking. Here we present a unique dataset on the climatic niche characteristics of 397 European butterflies representing 91% of the European species (see Appendix). These characteristics were obtained by combining detailed information on butterfly distributions in Europe (which also led to the 'Distribution Atlas of Butterflies in Europe') and the corresponding climatic conditions. The presented dataset comprises information for the position and breadth of the following climatic niche characteristics: mean annual temperature, range in annual temperature, growing degree days, annual precipitation sum, range in annual precipitation and soil water content. The climatic niche position is indicated by the median and mean value for each climate variable across a species' range, accompanied by the 95% confidence interval for the mean and the number of grid cells used for calculations. Climatic niche breadth is indicated by the standard deviation and the minimum and maximum values for each climatic variable across a species' range. Database compilation was based on high quality standards and the data are ready to use for a broad range of applications. It is already evident that the information provided in this dataset is of great relevance for basic and applied ecology. Based on the species temperature index (STI, i.e. the mean temperature value per species), the community temperature index (CTI, i.e. the average STI value across the species in a community) was recently adopted as an indicator of climate change impact on biodiversity by the pan-European framework supporting the Convention on Biological Diversity (Streamlining European Biodiversity Indicators 2010) and has already been used in several scientific publications. The application potential of this database ranges from theoretical aspects such as assessments of past niche evolution or analyses of trait interdependencies to the very applied aspects of measuring, monitoring and projecting historical, ongoing and potential future responses to climate change using butterflies as an indicator. Keywords: Climate change, climate warming, CTI, global change, global warming, modelling, risk, trend, STI, Europe, butterflies, Lepidoptera, Papilionidae, Pieridae, Lycaenidae, Riodinidae, Nymphalidae, Hesperiidae
    Keywords: Butterflies – Analysis ; Soil Moisture – Analysis ; Climate – Analysis ; Biodiversity – Analysis ; Niches (Ecology) – Analysis ; Global Warming – Analysis
    ISSN: 1313-2989
    E-ISSN: 13132970
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Ecological Indicators, December 2018, Vol.95, pp.735-740
    Description: Transect counts are one of the most popular approaches to assess and monitor butterfly diversity, especially with the background of biodiversity loss. This method was developed in Europe, but its transferability is seldom tested across the world. To assess transferability, we compared butterfly richness estimates based on transect counts in Spain, Germany and central China, a region with a considerably different biogeographic history and more diverse butterfly fauna compared to Europe. We found that the efficiency of transect counts was much lower in China than in the other two regions. Apart from the fact that traditional transect counts may undersample canopy species which are predominant in central China, higher efficiency in Europe may be primarily attributed to different patterns of butterfly richness likely caused by different biogeographic and anthropogenic land-use history. Our results highlight that great caution is needed when transect count methods are transferred to other regions of the world, especially to particularly species rich areas with a high number of rare species. Low detectability of certain species can substantially mask species richness estimates, and we suggest to carefully adapt sampling effort and perhaps combine transect counts with other methods to ensure more realistic assessment of species richness in such regions.
    Keywords: Transect Counts ; Butterfly Richness ; Butterfly Diversity ; Rarefaction Curves ; Environmental Sciences
    ISSN: 1470-160X
    E-ISSN: 1872-7034
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  • 3
    In: Diversity and Distributions, December 2017, Vol.23(12), pp.1393-1407
    Description: To purchase or authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ddi.12634/abstract Byline: Nicolas Titeux,Dirk Maes,Toon Van Daele,Thierry Onkelinx, Risto K. Heikkinen,Helena Romo,Enrique Garcia-Barros,Miguel L. Munguira,Wilfried Thuiller,Chris A. M. van Swaay,Oliver Schweiger,Josef Settele, Alexander Harpke, Martin Wiemers,Lluis Brotons,Miska Luoto Keywords: bioclimatic models; butterflies; climate envelopes; climatic niche; local approaches; species distribution modelling Abstract Aim Species distribution models built with geographically restricted data often fail to capture the full range of conditions experienced by species across their entire distribution area. Using such models to predict distribution shifts under future environmental change may, therefore, produce biased projections. However, restricted-scale models have the potential to include a larger sample of taxa for which distribution data are available and to provide finer-resolution projections that are better applied to conservation planning than the forecasts of broad-scale models. We examine the circumstances under which the projected shifts in species richness patterns derived from restricted-scale and broad-scale models are most likely to be similar. Location Europe. Methods The distribution of butterflies in Finland, Belgium/Netherlands and Spain was modelled based on restricted-scale (local) and broad-scale (continental) distribution and climate data. Both types of models were projected under future climate change scenarios to assess potential changes in species richness. Results In Finland, species richness was projected to increase strongly based on restricted-scale models and to decrease slightly with broad-scale models. In Belgium/Netherlands, restricted-scale models projected a larger decrease in richness than broad-scale models. In Spain, both models projected a slight decrease in richness. We obtained similar projections based on restricted-scale and broad-scale models only in Spain because the climatic conditions available here covered the warm part of the distributions of butterflies better than in Finland and Belgium/Netherlands. Main conclusions Restricted-scale models that fail to capture the warm part of species distributions produce biased estimates of future changes in species richness when projected under climatic conditions with no modern analogue in the study area. We recommend the use of distribution data beyond the boundaries of the study area to capture the part of the species response curves reflecting the climatic conditions that will prevail within that area in the future. Article Note: Funding information European Commission Framework Programmes (FP6 and FP7) via the Integrated Project ALARM, Grant/Award Number: 506675; Integrated Project SCALES, Grant/Award Number: 226852; Collaborative Project STEP, Grant/Award Number: 244090; BiodivERsA Eranet Project CLIMIT; Collaborative Project EU BON, Grant/Award Number: 308454; ERC Starting Grant TEEMBIO, Grant/Award Number: 281422; Structuring the European Research Area Program, Lapland Atmosphere-Biosphere Facility, Grant/Award Number: 025969 CAPTION(S):
    Keywords: Bioclimatic Models ; Butterflies ; Climate Envelopes ; Climatic Niche ; Local Approaches ; Species Distribution Modelling
    ISSN: 1366-9516
    E-ISSN: 1472-4642
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Basic and Applied Ecology, December 2015, Vol.16(8), pp.661-664
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.baae.2015.10.003 Byline: Josef Settele, Joachim H. Spangenberg, Kong Luen Heong, Benjamin Burkhard, Jesus Victor Bustamante, Jimmy Cabbigat, Ho Van Chien, Monina Escalada, Volker Grescho, Le Huu Hai, Alexander Harpke, Finbarr G. Horgan, Stefan Hotes, Reinhold Jahn, Ingolf Kuhn, Leonardo Marquez, Martin Schadler, Vera Tekken, Doris Vetterlein, Sylvia "Bong" Villareal, Catrin Westphal, Martin Wiemers Author Affiliation: (a) UFZ -- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, 06120 Halle, Germany (b) iDiv, German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research, Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 5e, 04103 Leipzig, Germany (c) Sustainable Europe Research Institute SERI Germany e.V., Vorsterstr. 97-99, 51103 Cologne, Germany (d) IRRI -- International Rice Research Institute, Los Banos, DAPO, 7777 Metro Manila, Philippines (e) Institute for Natural Resource Conservation, Kiel University, Olshausenstra[sz]e 40, 24098 Kiel, Germany (f) Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research ZALF, Eberswalder Str. 84, 15374 Muncheberg, Germany (g) LEGATO Office, 3601 Banaue, Ifugao, Philippines (h) Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development Vietnam, Tien Giang, Vietnam (i) Department of Development Communication, Visayas State University, Visca, Baybay 6521, Leyte, Philippines (j) OLANIS GmbH, Pittlerstra[sz]e 33, 04159 Leipzig, Germany (k) Tien Giang University, My Tho, Vietnam (l) General and Animal Ecology, Biology, Philipps-University Marburg, Karl-v.-Frisch-Str. 8, 35043 Marburg, Germany (m) Chair of Soil Science, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Von-Seckendorff-Platz 3, 06120 Halle, Germany (n) Crop Protection Division, Philippine Rice Research Institute, Maligaya, Munoz, Nueva Ecija, Philippines (o) Institute for Geography and Geology, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 16, 17487 Greifswald, Germany (p) Agorecology, Georg-August University Gottingen, Grisebachstrasse 6, 37077 Gottingen, Germany (q) Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, PR China Article History: Received 13 October 2015; Accepted 17 October 2015
    Keywords: Ecological Engineering ; Landscape Structure ; Media Campaigns ; Nutrients ; Pest Control ; Philippines ; Pollination ; Silicon ; Sustainable Land Use ; Vietnam ; Environmental Sciences ; Biology ; Ecology
    ISSN: 1439-1791
    E-ISSN: 16180089
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  • 5
    In: Nature Communications, 2016, Vol.7
    Description: Impacts of climate change on individual species are increasingly well documented, but we lack understanding of how these effects propagate through ecological communities. Here we combine species distribution models with ecological network analyses to test potential impacts of climate change on 〉700 plant and animal species in pollination and seed-dispersal networks from central Europe. We discover that animal species that interact with a low diversity of plant species have narrow climatic niches and are most vulnerable to climate change. In contrast, biotic specialization of plants is not related to climatic niche breadth and vulnerability. A simulation model incorporating different scenarios of species coextinction and capacities for partner switches shows that projected plant extinctions under climate change are more likely to trigger animal coextinctions than vice versa. This result demonstrates that impacts of climate change on biodiversity can be amplified via extinction cascades from plants to animals in ecological networks.
    Keywords: Climate Change ; Ecosystem ; Extinction, Biological ; Plants -- Metabolism;
    ISSN: 2041-1723
    E-ISSN: 2041-1723
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Paddy and Water Environment, 2018, Vol.16(2), pp.211-224
    Keywords: Life Sciences ; Agriculture ; Hydrology/Water Resources ; Hydrogeology ; Geoecology/Natural Processes ; Ecotoxicology ; Soil Science & Conservation ; Agriculture;
    ISSN: 1611-2490
    E-ISSN: 1611-2504
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  • 7
    In: BioRisk, 11/27/2009, Vol.2, pp.33-72
    Description: In the Climatic Risk Atlas of European Butterflies by Settele et al. (2008) some errors occurred for which we apologize and herewith present the corrections.
    Keywords: Ecology;
    ISSN: 1313-2644
    E-ISSN: 1313-2652
    Source: CrossRef
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  • 8
    In: BioRisk, 12/03/2008, Vol.1, pp.1-712
    Description: The overarching aim of the atlas is to communicate the potential risks of climatic change to the future of European butterflies. The main objectives are to: (1) provide a visual aid to discussions on climate change risks and impacts on biodiversity and thus contribute to risk communication as a core element of risk assessment; (2) present crucial data on a large group of species which could help to prioritise conservation efforts in the face of climatic change; (3) reach a broader audience through the combination of new scientific results with photographs of all treated species and some straight forward information about the species and their ecology. The results of this atlas show that climate change is likely to have a profound effect on European butterflies. Ways to mitigate some of the negative impacts are to (1) maintain large populations in diverse habitats; (2) encourage mobility across the landscape; (3) reduce emissions of greenhouse gasses; (4) allow maximum time for species adaptation; (4) conduct further research on climate change and its impacts on biodiversity. The book is a result of long-term research of a large international team of scientists, working at research institutes and non-governmental organizations, many within the framework of projects funded by the European Commission. Each chapter may be browsed/downloaded from the links below: 0. COVER, TITLE PAGE, CONTENTS [PDF, 608 KB] A. CLIMATE CHANGE, BIODIVERSITY, BUTTERFLIES, AND RISK ASSESSMENT [PDF, 208 KB] B. METHODOLOGY [PDF, 516 KB] C. CLIMATE RISKS OF EUROPEAN BUTTERFLY SPECIES. Introduction and Hesperidae [PDF, 5.6 MB]; Papilionidae [PDF, 1.61 MB]; Pieridae [PDF, 5.0 MB]; Lycaenidae, Riodinidae, Libytheidae [PDF, 12 MB]; Nymphalidae, Danaidae [PDF, 21.2 MB]; Non-modelled species and summary [PDF, 328 KB] D. DISCUSSION OF METHODOLOGICAL LIMITATIONS [PDF, 572 KB] E. OUTLOOK: CLIMATE CHANGE AND BUTTERFLY CONSERVATION [PDF, 228 KB] F. APPENDICES, REFERENCES AND INDEX [PDF, 424 KB] Full-color paperback (EURO 59.00) and/or hardback (EURO 89.00) versions may be ordered at info@pensoft.net.
    Keywords: Ecology;
    ISSN: 1313-2644
    E-ISSN: 1313-2652
    Source: CrossRef
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