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  • Ziv, Yaron  (8)
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  • 1
    In: PLoS ONE, 2017, Vol.12(2)
    Description: [This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0168417.].
    Keywords: Correction
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 2
    Language: Spanish
    In: Conservation Biology, February 2012, Vol.26(1), pp.150-159
    Description: :  Habitat loss reduces species diversity, but the effect of habitat fragmentation on number of species is less clear because fragmentation generally accompanies loss of habitat. We compared four methods that aim to decouple the effects of fragmentation from the effects of habitat loss. Two methods are based on species‐area relations, one on Fisher's alpha index of diversity, and one on plots of cumulative number of species detected against cumulative area sampled. We used these methods to analyze the species diversity of spiders in 2, 3.2 × 4 km agricultural landscapes in Southern Judea Lowlands, Israel. Spider diversity increased as fragmentation increased with all four methods, probably not because of the additive within‐patch processes, such as edge effect and heterogeneity. The positive relation between fragmentation and species diversity might reflect that most species can disperse through the fields during the wheat‐growing season. We suggest that if a given area was designated for the conservation of spiders in Southern Judea Lowlands, Israel, a set of several small patches may maximize species diversity over time.
    Keywords: Arthropods ; Landscape ; Sloss ; Species Diversity ; Species‐Area Relation ; Artrópodos ; Diversidad De Especies ; Paisaje ; Relación Especies‐Área ; Sloss
    ISSN: 0888-8892
    E-ISSN: 1523-1739
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  • 3
    In: Journal of Biogeography, April 2017, Vol.44(4), pp.937-949
    Description: Byline: Yoni Gavish, Yaron Ziv Keywords: biodiversity patterns; islands; Jaccard; landscape; macroecology; multiple-sites similarity; occupancy-frequency distribution; patches; Sorensen; spatial ecology Abstract Aim Although species-occupancy distributions (SODs) and species-area relationships (SARs) arise from the two marginal sums of the same presence/absence matrices, the two biodiversity patterns are usually explored independently. Here, we aim to unify the two patterns for isolate-based data by constraining the SAR to conserve information from the SOD. Location Widespread. Methods Focusing on the power-model SAR, we first developed a constrained form that conserved the total number of occupancies from the SOD. Next, we developed an additive-constrained SAR that conserves the entire shape of the SOD within the power-model SAR function, using a single parameter (the slope of the endemics-area relationship). We then relate this additive-constrained SAR to multiple-sites similarity measures, based on a probabilistic view of Sorensen similarity. We extend the constrained and additive-constrained SAR framework to 23 published SAR functions. We compare the fit of the original and constrained forms of 12 SAR functions using 154 published data sets, covering various spatial scales, taxa and systems. Main conclusions In all 23 SAR functions, the constrained form had one parameter less than the original form. In all 154 data sets the model with the highest weight based on the corrected Akaike's information criteria (wAICc) had a constrained form. The constrained form received higher wAICc than the original form in 98.79% of valid pairwise cases, approaching the wAICc expected under identical log-likelihood. Our work suggests, both theoretically and empirically, that all SAR functions may have one unnecessary parameter, which can be excluded from the function without reduction in goodness-of-fit. The more parsimonious constrained forms are also easier to interpret as they reflect the probability of a randomly chosen occupancy to be found in an isolate. The additive-constrained SARs accounts for two complimentary turn-over components of occupancies: turnover between species and turnover between sites. Article Note: Editor: Francois Guilhaumon CAPTION(S): Appendix S1 AICc, wAICc and expected AICc. Appendix S2 References and information on data sets. Appendix S3 Linear regressions of wAICc.
    Keywords: Biodiversity Patterns ; Islands ; Jaccard ; Landscape ; Macroecology ; Multiple‐Sites Similarity ; Occupancy‐Frequency Distribution ; Patches ; Sørensen ; Spatial Ecology
    ISSN: 0305-0270
    E-ISSN: 1365-2699
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  • 4
    In: PLoS ONE, 2016, Vol.11(12)
    Description: Understanding the main processes that affect community similarity have been the focus of much ecological research. However, the relative effects of environmental and spatial aspects in structuring ecological communities is still unresolved and is probably scale-dependent. Here, we examine the effect of habitat identity and spatial distance on fine-grained community similarity within a biogeographic transition zone. We compared four hypotheses: i) habitat identity alone, ii) spatial proximity alone, iii) non-interactive effects of both habitat identity and spatial proximity, and iv) interactive effect of habitat identity and spatial proximity. We explored these hypotheses for spiders in three fragmented landscapes located along the sharp climatic gradient of Southern Judea Lowlands (SJL), Israel. We sampled 14,854 spiders (from 199 species or morphospecies) in 644 samples, taken in 35 patches and stratified to nine different habitats. We calculated the Bray-Curtis similarity between all samples-pairs. We divided the pairwise values to four functional distance categories (same patch, different patches from the same landscape, adjacent landscapes and distant landscapes) and two habitat categories (same or different habitats) and compared them using non-parametric MANOVA. A significant interaction between habitat identity and spatial distance was found, such that the difference in mean similarity between same-habitat pairs and different-habitat pairs decreases with spatial distance. Additionally, community similarity decayed with spatial distance. Furthermore, at all distances, same-habitat pairs had higher similarity than different-habitats pairs. Our results support the fourth hypothesis of interactive effect of habitat identity and spatial proximity. We suggest that the environmental complexity of habitats or increased habitat specificity of species near the edge of their distribution range may explain this pattern. Thus, in transitions zones care should be taken when using habitats as surrogate of community composition in conservation planning since similar habitats in different locations are more likely to support different communities.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Ecology And Environmental Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Ecology And Environmental Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Ecology And Environmental Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Ecology And Environmental Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Ecology And Environmental Sciences ; Earth Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Ecology And Environmental Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Ecology And Environmental Sciences
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Oecologia, 2016, Vol.180(1), pp.243-244
    Keywords: Livestock ; Reptiles ; Agroecosystems;
    ISSN: 0029-8549
    E-ISSN: 1432-1939
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Oecologia, 2016, Vol.180(1), pp.231-242
    Description: Grazing plays an important role in shaping ecological communities in human-related ecosystems. Although myriad studies have explored the joint effect of grazing and climate on plant communities, this interactive effect has rarely been studied in animals. We hypothesized that the effect of grazing on the reptile community varies along a climatic gradient in relation to the effect of grazing on habitat characteristics, and that grazing differentially affects reptiles of different biogeographic regions. We tested our hypotheses by collecting data on environmental characteristics and by trapping reptiles in four heterogeneous landscapes experiencing differing grazing intensities and distributed along a sharp climatic gradient. We found that while reptile diversity increased with grazing intensity at the mesic end of the gradient, it decreased with grazing intensity at the arid end. Moreover, the proportion of reptile species of differing biogeographic origins varied with the interactive effect of climate and grazing. The representation of species originating in arid biogeographic zones was highest at the arid end of the climatic gradient, and representation increased with grazing intensity within this area. Regardless of the climatic context, increased grazing pressure results in a reduction in vegetation cover and thus in changes in habitat characteristics. By reducing vegetation cover, grazing increased habitat heterogeneity in the dense mesic sites and decreased habitat heterogeneity in the arid sites. Thus, our results suggest that the same direction of habitat alteration caused by grazing may have opposite effects on biodiversity and community composition in different climatic contexts.
    Keywords: Arid ; Biogeography ; Ecotone ; Fisher’s alpha ; Habitat heterogeneity ; Herpetofauna ; Mediterranean
    ISSN: 0029-8549
    E-ISSN: 1432-1939
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Biodiversity and Conservation, 2019, Vol.28(3), pp.769-786
    Description: To understand patterns of alpha, beta and gamma diversities in fragmented landscapes we need to explore the three scale components in relation to potential drivers in a scale-dependent manner. Often, the drivers themselves can be partitioned to alpha, beta and gamma diversities. Thus, one can hypothesize that the scale-components of species diversity and drivers’ diversity match, i.e., that species alpha diversity is mainly explained by drivers’ alpha diversity, beta by beta and gamma by gamma. Here, we explore this ‘scale-matching’ hypothesis for spiders in two fragmented agricultural landscapes. In each landscape, we sampled spiders and their potential prey in 12 patches. Then, we sub-sampled pseudo-landscapes in which we calculated spider alpha, beta and gamma diversities using multiplicative diversity-partitioning. Next, we used variance partitioning analysis to explore the relative contribution of eleven explanatory variables from five thematic groups (sampling intensity, area, connectivity, habitat diversity and prey diversity), while further partitioning the habitat and prey diversities to their corresponding alpha, beta and gamma diversities. We found considerable evidence for scale-matching, with spiders’ alpha and beta diversities explained mostly by the corresponding alpha and beta diversities (respectively) of prey and/or habitat. We further found a strong effect of connectivity on spider beta diversity, but not on alpha and gamma diversities. For spiders gamma diversity, a cross-scale effect was observed. Our results suggest that multiple drivers from multiple scales interact in structuring patterns of spider alpha, beta and gamma diversities in agro-ecosystems, yet the strongest effects are of those drivers that match in scale.
    Keywords: Agroecosystems ; Araneae ; Community composition ; Effective diversity ; Fragmentation ; Meta-community ; Scale
    ISSN: 0960-3115
    E-ISSN: 1572-9710
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Ecology, 05 August 2019, pp.e02861
    Description: Habitat destruction is the single greatest anthropogenic threat to biodiversity. Decades of research on this issue have led to the accumulation of hundreds of data sets comparing species assemblages in larger, intact, habitats to smaller, more fragmented, habitats. Despite this, little synthesis or consensus has been achieved, primarily because of non-standardized sampling methodology and analyses of notoriously scale-dependent response variables (i.e., species richness). To be able to compare and contrast the results of habitat fragmentation on species' assemblages, it is necessary to have the underlying data on species abundances and sampling intensity, so that standardization can be achieved. To accomplish this, we systematically searched the literature for studies where abundances of species in assemblages (of any taxa) were sampled from many habitat patches that varied in size. From these, we extracted data from several studies, and contacted authors of studies where appropriate data were collected but not published, giving us 117 studies that compared species assemblages among habitat fragments that varied in area. Less than one-half (41) of studies came from tropical forests of Central and South America, but there were many studies from temperate forests and grasslands from all continents except Antarctica. Fifty-four of the studies were on invertebrates (mostly insects), but there were several studies on plants (15), birds (16), mammals (19), and reptiles and amphibians (13). We also collected qualitative information on the length of time since fragmentation. With data on total and relative abundances (and identities) of species, sampling effort, and affiliated meta-data about the study sites, these data can be used to more definitively test hypotheses about the role of habitat fragmentation in altering patterns of biodiversity. There are no copyright restrictions. Please cite this data paper and the associated Dryad data set if the data are used in publications.
    Keywords: Disturbance ; Habitat Fragmentation ; Habitat Loss ; Species Abundance Distribution ; Species Richness ; Species-Area Relationship
    ISSN: 00129658
    E-ISSN: 1939-9170
    Source: MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
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