Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Dissertation
    Dissertation
    Landwirtschaftlich-Gärtnerische Fakultät
    Language: English
    Description: Littoral macroinvertebrates are an important biotic component of lakes by contributing substantially to the biodiversity and functioning of lake ecosystems. Humans alter the littoral and riparian areas for various purposes, but the resulting ecological impacts on littoral macroinvertebrates have not been quantified. In this thesis, I investigated the significance of key environmental factors for littoral macroinvertebrate communities and how human alterations of these environmental factors impact the structure and function of macroinvertebrate communities. Macroinvertebrate community composition was significantly related to littoral structure, trophic state and the hydrodynamic regime. The significantly higher compositional dissimilarities among habitats than among trophic state suggested that littoral structure was the more important driver of community composition. Structural degradation caused a significant reduction of habitat heterogeneity and resulted in a significant reduction of species diversity and a significant altered community composition. This caused a significant reduction of macroinvertebrate food web complexity and substantial alterations of the trophic base of the food webs. Climate-change induced water level fluctuations resulted in the loss of root habitats and the specific community associated with this habitat. Ship-induced waves had substantial direct effects, since macroinvertebrates were detached from their habitats by waves even at moderate shear stress levels. However, the impacts of water level fluctuations and ship-induced waves were mitigated by the presence of habitats with high structural complexities. This thesis provided a mechanistic understanding of how human activities alter relationships between environmental factors and biotic communities. This knowledge can be used to develop scientifically sound approaches to assess the persistent human impacts on lake ecosystems.
    Description: Das litorale Makrozoobenthos ist eine bedeutende biotische Komponente in Seen und trägt substantiell zur Biodiversität und Funktion von Seeökosystemen bei. Allerdings unterliegt das Litoral zunehmenden anthropogenen Nutzungen, deren ökologische Auswirkungen jedoch kaum quantifiziert wurden. In dieser Doktorarbeit wurde untersucht, welche Bedeutung maßgebliche Umweltfaktoren auf die Zusammensetzung des litoralen Makrozoobenthos haben, und wie sich anthropogene Nutzungen auf die Zusammensetzung und Funktion des Makrozoobenthos auswirken. Die Zusammensetzung des Makrozoobenthos wurde durch die Uferstruktur, Trophie und das hydrodynamische Regime bestimmt. Die faunistische Ähnlichkeit zwischen Habitaten war jedoch signifikant geringer als zwischen Trophiestufen, so dass die Uferstruktur, und nicht die Trophie, einen größeren Einfluss auf das Makrozoobenthos hat. Strukturelle Degradation führte zu einer Reduktion der Habitatheterogenität, was eine signifikante Verringerung der Diversität und eine signifikant veränderte Artenzusammensetzung verursachte. Infolgedessen war die Komplexität der Makrozoobenthos-Nahrungsnetze an degradierten Ufern signifikant geringer als an natürlichen Ufern. Erhöhte Wasserstandsschwankungen führten zum Ausfall von Wurzelhabitaten und der damit assoziierten Makrozoobenthos-Gemeinschaft. Schiffsinduzierter Wellenschlag führte zur Verdriftung des Makrozoobenthos von ihren Habitaten bereits bei geringen Sohlschubspannungen. Die Effekte von Wasserstandsschwankungen und schiffsinduziertem Wellenschlag wurden jedoch durch Habitate mit hoher struktureller Komplexität verringert. Mit dieser Doktorarbeit konnte ich ein mechanistisches Verständnis darüber erarbeiten, wie anthropogene Nutzungen die Wirkungsbeziehungen zwischen Umweltfaktoren und Artengemeinschaften verändern und welche ökologischen Auswirkungen dies hat. Diese Kenntnisse können als wissenschaftliche Basis zur Bewertung von anthropogenen Beeinträchtigungen des Litorals dienen.
    Keywords: Zd 39000 ; Water Level Fluctuations ; Wi 4700 ; Ökologische Stöchiometrie ; Garten ; Eutrophierung ; Veterinärmedizin ; Landwirtschaft ; Nahrungsnetze ; Wi 4730 ; Ecological Stoichiometry ; Wasserstandsschwankungen ; Eutrophication ; Strukturelle Degradation ; Structural Degradation ; Food Webs ; Schiffsinduzierter Wellenschlag ; Ship-Induced Waves
    Source: AGRIS (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Hydrobiologia, 2016, Vol.768(1), pp.37-50
    Description: Length–mass relationships are widely used to estimate body mass from body dimensions for freshwater macroinvertebrates. The relationships are influenced by environmental conditions and should be applied within ecosystems and geographic regions similar to those for which they were estimated. However, very few relationships exist for littoral macroinvertebrates, and thus we provide length–mass relationships for macroinvertebrates from lakes of the Central European lowlands. We compared log-linear and nonlinear methods for fitting length–mass relationships and tested the smearing factor for removing bias in mass predictions from log-linear models. We also estimated conversion factors to correct for mass changes during ethanol preservation and assessed the transferability of our results to different geographical regions. We showed that the log-linear approach gave better results in fitting length–mass relationships, while residuals showed that nonlinear models over-predict the mass of small individuals. The smearing correction factor successfully removed bias introduced by log transformation, and relationships transferred well between lakes in the same and different geographical regions. In total, 52 bias-corrected length–mass relationships are provided for littoral macroinvertebrates that are applicable also to lakes in geographic regions with similar environmental conditions, such as the Central European lowlands or the temperate lowland zone of America.
    Keywords: Preservation conversion factor ; Smearing factor ; Length–mass relationships ; Macroinvertebrates ; Additive vs. multiplicative errors ; Log-linear vs. nonlinear regression
    ISSN: 0018-8158
    E-ISSN: 1573-5117
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Hydrobiologia, 2016, Vol.776(1), pp.51-65
    Description: This study addressed the influence of common shoreline engineering structures (off-bankline revetment, rip rap and wing dike) on richness, biomass and secondary production of native and non-native macroinvertebrates in the navigation channel and near-shore habitats in the Elbe River (Germany). Within the navigation channel, only marginal differences among engineering structures were observed, and non-native species were absent from all samples. At the shoreline, secondary production of non-native species was significantly greater at the rip rap and represented 59% of total secondary production in near-shore habitats. Conversely, secondary production of native species at the shoreline was 9-fold lower at the rip rap and more than twice the rates at the wing dike. Differences in secondary production among engineering structures were attributed to differential distribution of substrate types. Boulder substrates, the dominant substrate type in the rip rap, promoted contributions of non-native species while macrophytes and silt were associated with high contributions of native species at the off-bankline revetment. Our results reveal that the morphological configuration of engineering structures in large rivers not only controls the rate of secondary production for macroinvertebrates but also the contribution of non-native species to total community functioning.
    Keywords: Ecosystem functioning ; Elbe River ; Dikerogammarus villosus ; Neozoa ; Non-native species ; River engineering
    ISSN: 0018-8158
    E-ISSN: 1573-5117
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Hydrobiologia, 2010, Vol.649(1), pp.365-373
    Description: Littoral macroinvertebrates are increasingly used for assessing the ecological status of lakes according to the EU Water Framework Directive. This requires harmonised sampling methods, but information on the appropriate spatial scale of the sampling as well as on the adequate sample sizes are mostly lacking. In this study, we compared the spatial variability of littoral (〈1.2 m water depth) macroinvertebrate community composition within habitats and within sites to test whether habitat-specific sampling can reduce their spatial variability. Furthermore, we determined the sample size necessary to obtain maximum species richness for a given habitat type. Spatial variability of macroinvertebrate community composition was significantly lower within habitats than within sampling sites, except for communities of coarse woody debris. Species–area curves revealed that a sample size of 1 m 2 per habitat was not sufficient to obtain the maximum species richness due to the dominance of rare species, which suggests that compilation of taxon inventories may require more exhaustive sampling with sampling sizes substantially larger than 1 m 2 . Separate analysis for species assigned to incidence classes showed that a mean area of 0.63 m 2 per habitat is sufficient to record all species with frequent and medium incidences, and 76% of the rare species. We conclude that habitat-specific sampling is an effective way to reduce the inherent spatial variability of littoral macroinvertebrate communities and that a sample size of 0.63 m 2 per habitat is sufficient to represent their dominant and subdominant elements. The application of this adequate sample size to other lake types than large oligotrophic lakes has to be exercised with caution, in particular if community composition and richness patterns differ. However, our results are based on data from lakes that represent the typical lake type found throughout the Central Baltic ecoregion ensuring its wider applicability in this ecoregion.
    Keywords: Coarse woody debris ; Spatial variability ; Species richness ; Species–area curves ; Water Framework Directive
    ISSN: 0018-8158
    E-ISSN: 1573-5117
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Hydrobiologia, 2016, Vol.767(1), pp.207-220
    Description: Lake shores are characterised by a high natural variability, which is increasingly threatened by a multitude of anthropogenic disturbances including morphological alterations to the littoral zone. The European Water Framework Directive (EU WFD) calls for the assessment of lake ecological status by monitoring biological quality elements including benthic macroinvertebrates. To identify cost- and time-efficient sampling strategies for routine lake monitoring, we sampled littoral invertebrates in 32 lakes located in different geographical regions in Europe. We compared the efficiency of two sampling methodologies, defined as habitat-specific and pooled composite sampling protocols. Benthic samples were collected from unmodified and morphologically altered shorelines. Variability within macroinvertebrate communities did not differ significantly between sampling protocols across alteration types, lake types and geographical regions. Community composition showed no significant differences between field composite samples and artificially generated composite samples, and correlation coefficients between macroinvertebrate metrics calculated with both methods and a predefined morphological stressor index were similar. We conclude that proportional composite sampling represents a time- and cost-efficient method for routine lake monitoring as requested under the EU WFD, and may be applied across various European geographical regions.
    Keywords: Morphological alteration ; Macroinvertebrates ; Lake monitoring ; Method comparison ; Littoral zone ; EU Water Framework Directive
    ISSN: 0018-8158
    E-ISSN: 1573-5117
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    In: Freshwater Biology, June 2007, Vol.52(6), pp.1022-1032
    Description: 1. Nutrient inputs from urban and agricultural land use often result in shifts in species composition of pelagic and profundal invertebrate communities. Here, we test if nutrient enrichment affects the composition of eulittoral macroinvertebrate communities, and, if so, if macroinvertebrate communities of five different habitat types reflect differences in trophic state. 2. Macroinvertebrate community composition of 36 lakes was significantly correlated with total phosphorus (TP) concentration, the proportion of coarse woody debris (CWD) and root habitats and the proportion of grassland. 3. However, macroinvertebrate communities of five major habitat types from eight lakes were more dissimilar among habitats than among trophic states. Community composition of reed and stone habitats was significantly correlated with wind exposure but not TP concentration, while macroinvertebrate composition of sand habitats was related to TP concentration and coarse sediments. In CWD and root habitats, both TP concentration and a predominance of invasive species covaried, which made it difficult to relate the observed compositional differences to either trophic state or to the effects of competition between native and invasive species. 4. Trophic state influenced the composition of eulittoral macroinvertebrate communities but to a lesser extent than has been previously reported for profundal habitats. Moreover, the effects of trophic state were nested within habitat type and were partially superseded by biotic interactions and small‐scaled habitat complexity. Although eulittoral macroinvertebrate communities were not strong indicators of the trophic state of lowland lakes, they may be used to assess other anthropogenic impacts on lakeshores.
    Keywords: Eutrophication ; Habitat ; Invasive Species ; Lakeshore ; Land Use
    ISSN: 0046-5070
    E-ISSN: 1365-2427
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Hydrobiologia, 2015, Vol.749(1), pp.31-42
    Description: Food-web effects of winterkill are difficult to predict as the enhanced mortality of planktivorous fish may be counterbalanced by an even higher mortality of piscivores. We hypothesised that a winterkill in a clear and a turbid shallow lake would equalise their fish community composition, but seasonal plankton successions would differ between lakes. After a partial winterkill, we observed a reduction of fish biomass by 16 and 43% in a clear-water and a turbid small temperate lake, respectively. Fish biomass and piscivore shares (5% of fish biomass) were similar in both lakes after this winterkill, but young-of-the-year (YOY) abundances were higher in the turbid lake. Top-down control by crustaceans was only partly responsible for low phytoplankton biomass at the end of May following the winterkill in both lakes. Summer phytoplankton biomass remained low in the clear-water lake despite high abundances of YOY fish (mainly roach). In contrast, the crustacean biomass of the turbid lake was reduced in summer by a high YOY abundance (sunbleak and roach), leading to a strong increase in phytoplankton biomass. The YOY abundance of fish in shallow eutrophic lakes may thus be more important for their summer phytoplankton development after winterkill than the relative abundance of piscivores.
    Keywords: Anoxia ; Fish ; Regime shifts ; Roach ; Shallow lakes ; Submerged macrophytes
    ISSN: 0018-8158
    E-ISSN: 1573-5117
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    In: Journal of Applied Ecology, December 2007, Vol.44(6), pp.1138-1144
    Description: 1 The shores of many lakes have been substantially altered by human developments such as erosion control structures or recreational beaches. Such alterations are likely to increase in the future, yet almost nothing is known about their impacts on the littoral macroinvertebrate community. 2 Macroinvertebrates were studied in seven German lowland lakes exhibiting natural shorelines (reference), retaining walls, ripraps and recreational beaches to examine impacts on the eulittoral (0–0·2 m water depth) and infralittoral (0·2–1·2 m water depth) communities associated with the three types of shoreline development. 3 Among sites, eulittoral species richness and abundance of Coleoptera, Gastropoda, Trichoptera, shredders and xylophagous species were lowest on beaches and retaining walls but ripraps did not differ significantly from natural shorelines. Retaining walls and ripraps had no significant impact on the infralittoral macroinvertebrate community. Conversely, beaches had significantly lower infralittoral species richness and abundance of Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera and shredders than natural shorelines. Furthermore, species richness was correlated positively with habitat heterogeneity expressed as number of habitat types. 4 Among lakes, whole‐lake littoral macroinvertebrate density increased with increasing proportion of developed shorelines due to increasing abundances of Chironomidae. The remaining macroinvertebrate major groups decreased with increasing proportion of shoreline development. 5 Synthesis and applications. The biological impacts of shoreline development in lowland lakes depend upon the extent to which structural complexity and heterogeneity of littoral habitats are reduced. Hence, we recommend that management programmes focus upon the conservation of littoral habitat complexity and habitat heterogeneity. The biological effects of shoreline development may be assessed efficiently by combining an assessment of the morphological status of lakeshores and information on macroinvertebrate indicator species with a defined response to the loss of their preferred habitats.
    Keywords: Biodiversity ; Coarse Woody Debris ; Habitat Complexity ; Lake Management ; Macrophytes ; Recreational Beaches ; Retaining Walls ; Riparian Clearcutting ; Ripraps
    ISSN: 0021-8901
    E-ISSN: 1365-2664
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Hydrobiologia, 2008, Vol.613(1), pp.5-12
    Description: East-German lowland lakes are highly susceptible to climatic changes, as most lakes are groundwater fed and strongly dependent on the balance of precipitation and evapotranspiration in their catchments. As a significant decrease of precipitation at least during summer is forecasted, a substantial and permanent reduction of lake water levels can be expected. Water-level fluctuations will predominantly affect the eulittoral zone where submerged tree roots form an important habitat type in lowland lakes that will become unavailable for eulittoral invertebrates. Hence, we compared the invertebrate community from eulittoral root habitats with those of infralittoral habitats to test which components of the invertebrate community would be potentially affected by the loss of root habitats, and whether infralittoral habitat types could mitigate these effects. Species richness did not significantly differ between eulittoral roots and the infralittoral habitat types. Community composition of roots significantly differed from that of coarse woody debris, sand and stones but not from reed habitats. Abundances of Coleoptera, Trichoptera and abundances of piercer, predator, shredder and xylophagous species were significantly lower on sand than on roots. Conversely, there were no significant differences in community measures between reed and root habitats except abundances of Coleoptera. Our results suggest that the loss of eulittoral root habitats will cause a significant alteration of the littoral invertebrate community. This could be mitigated if unimpaired reed habitats are available in the infralittoral zone which may serve as a refuge for most species typical for root habitats. Our results need to be verified by direct observations, especially as the extent of future water-level fluctuations is currently not assessable and might be more severe than assumed.
    Keywords: Climate change ; Habitat–species relationships ; Reed ; Roots
    ISSN: 0018-8158
    E-ISSN: 1573-5117
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Ecosystems (New York. Print), 2016, Vol.19(2), pp.311-325
    Description: Ecosystems are generally linked via fluxes of nutrients and energy across their boundaries. For example, freshwater ecosystems in temperate regions may receive significant inputs of terrestrially derived carbon via autumnal leaf litter. This terrestrial...
    Keywords: Natural Sciences ; Naturvetenskap
    ISSN: 1432-9840
    E-ISSN: 14350629
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages