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  • Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)  (7)
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: BMC Microbiology, 01 May 2007, Vol.7(1), p.49
    Description: Abstract Background West Nile virus (WNV) infection can cause severe meningitis and encephalitis in humans. Apoptosis was recently shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of WNV encephalitis. Here, we used WNV-infected glioma cells to study WNV-replication and WNV-induced apoptosis in human brain-derived cells. Results T98G cells are highly permissive for lytic WNV-infection as demonstrated by the production of infectious virus titre and the development of a characteristic cytopathic effect. WNV replication decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis as indicated by the activation of the effector caspase-3, the initiator caspases-8 and -9, poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) cleavage and the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. Truncation of BID indicated cross-talk between the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Inhibition of the caspases-8 or -9 inhibited PARP cleavage, demonstrating that both caspases are involved in WNV-induced apoptosis. Pan-caspase inhibition prevented WNV-induced apoptosis without affecting virus replication. Conclusion We found that WNV infection induces cell death in the brain-derived tumour cell line T98G by apoptosis under involvement of constituents of the extrinsic as well as the intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Our results illuminate the molecular mechanism of WNV-induced neural cell death.
    Keywords: Biology
    ISSN: 1471-2180
    E-ISSN: 1471-2180
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  • 2
    In: PLoS ONE, 2011, Vol.6(11)
    Description: Background Since the isolation of Helicobacter species in biliary system, a hypothetical question was raised about the role of these agents in the development of cholelithiasis. This meta-analysis is to explore the association between the Helicobacter infection and biliary lithiasis. Methodology/Principal Findings A systematic literature search was performed to identify all eligible articles. Meta-analysis which was carried out using odds ratio and random effect model, 95% confidence intervals for odds ratio was calculated. Quantitative assessment of heterogeneity was explored by chi-square test with significance set at P value 0.10 and was measured using I 2 statistic. Eighteen studies published between 1998 and 2011 were finally eligible for meta-analysis. H. Pylori, H. Bilis, H. Hepaticus, H. Pullorum and H. Ganmani were studied. With heterogeneity ( I 2  = 69.5%, P〈0.0001), significantly higher pooled infection rates of H. Pylori (OR: 2.59, 35.82% versus 26.75%, P = 0.01) and H. Hepaticus (OR: 3.13, 31.30% versus 12.12%, P = 0.02) were observed in lithiasis group. Higher prevalence of H. Pylori in cholelithiasis patients were reported by studies from East Asia, South Asia and South America. Evidences supporting the higher presence of H. Pylori in cholelithiasis patients could be found by PCR for detecting 16s rRNA in bile, 26kDa protein gene in biliary tissue and immunohistochemistry. Using multiple detection tests could increase the detection rate of H. Pylori . Conclusions/Significances Our meta-analysis suggests a trend of higher presence of H. Pylori in cholelithiasis patients than control group and this trend was significant in the regions with higher prevalence of this agent. Evidences supporting the association between Helicobacter and cholelithiasis could be found by using different tests but the gold standard for the identification of these bacteria in biliary system has yet to be established. Considering obvious heterogeneity, a large multi-center study will facilitate us to further clarify the association between the Helicobacter infection and cholelithiasis.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology ; Medicine ; Infectious Diseases ; Microbiology ; Surgery ; Gastroenterology And Hepatology
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 01 January 2013, Vol.8(6), p.e66825
    Description: Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a well-established oncolytic agent against different types of tumors. MYXV is also known for its immunomodulatory properties in down-regulating major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I surface expression (via the M153R gene product, a viral E3-ubiquitin ligase) and suppressing T cell killing of infected target cells. MHC I down-regulation, however, favors NK cell activation. Brain tumors including gliomas are characterized by high MHC I expression with impaired NK activity. We thus hypothesized that MYXV infection of glioma cells will promote NK cell-mediated recognition and killing of gliomas. We infected human gliomas with MYXV and evaluated their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. MYXV enhanced NK cell-mediated killing of glioma cells (U87 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 51.73% vs. 28.63%, P = .0001, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 40.4% vs. 20.03%, P .0007, t test). Using MYXV M153R targeted knockout (designated vMyx-M153KO) to infect gliomas, we demonstrate that M153R was responsible for reduced expression of MHC I on gliomas and enhanced NK cell-mediated antiglioma activity (U87 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 51.73% vs. 25.17%, P = .0002, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 40.4% vs. 19.27, P = .0013, t test). Consequently, NK cell-mediated lysis of established human glioma tumors in CB-17 SCID mice was accelerated with improved mouse survival (log-rank P = .0072). These results demonstrate the potential for combining MYXV with NK cells to effectively kill malignant gliomas.
    Keywords: Sciences (General)
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: mBio, 01 August 2016, Vol.7(4), p.e00878-16
    Description: Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic yeast and a leading cause of life-threatening meningitis in AIDS patients. Natural killer (NK) cells are important immune effector cells that directly recognize and kill C. neoformans via a perforin-dependent cytotoxic mechanism. We previously showed that NK cells from HIV-infected patients have aberrant anticryptococcal killing and that interleukin-12 (IL-12) restores the activity at least partially through restoration of NKp30. However, the mechanisms causing this defect or how IL-12 restores the function was unknown. By examining the sequential steps in NK cell killing of Cryptococcus, we found that NK cells from HIV-infected patients had defective binding of NK cells to C. neoformans. Moreover, those NK cells that bound to C. neoformans failed to polarize perforin-containing granules to the microbial synapse compared to healthy controls, suggesting that binding was insufficient to restore a defect in perforin polarization. We also identified lower expression of intracellular perforin and defective perforin release from NK cells of HIV-infected patients in response to C. neoformans. Importantly, treatment of NK cells from HIV-infected patients with IL-12 reversed the multiple defects in binding, granule polarization, perforin content, and perforin release and restored anticryptococcal activity. Thus, there are multiple defects in the cytolytic machinery of NK cells from HIV-infected patients, which cumulatively result in defective NK cell anticryptococcal activity, and each of these defects can be reversed with IL-12.
    Keywords: Biology
    E-ISSN: 2150-7511
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Cell Reports, 11 September 2018, Vol.24(11), pp.3017-3032
    Description: is the most important cause of fungal meningitis in immunocompromised individuals. Host defense against involves direct killing by NK cells. That NK cells from HIV-infected patients fail to polarize perforin to the microbial synapse and kill led us to explore the mechanisms used to reposition and polarize the cytolytic granules to the synapse. Using live-cell imaging, we observed microtubule and granule movements in response to that revealed a kinesin-dependent event. Eg5-kinesin bound to perforin-containing granules and was required for association with the microtubules. Inhibition of Eg5-kinesin abrogated dynein-dependent granule convergence to the MTOC and granule and MTOC polarization to the synapse and suppressed NK cell killing of . In contrast, Eg5-kinesin was dispensable for tumor killing. This reveals an alternative mechanism of MTOC repositioning and granule polarization, not used in tumor cytotoxicity, in which Eg5-kinesin is required to initiate granule movement, leading to microbial killing. The mechanisms of cytolytic granules deployment and the events leading to selective use of perforin, and not granulysin, in NK-cell-mediated killing of are unknown. Ogbomo et al. demonstrate that Eg5-kinesin and dynein control these events. Eg5-kinesin activity is required to turn on dynein activity for directed cytotoxicity.
    Keywords: Eg5-Kinesin ; Dynein ; Nk Cell Cytotoxicity ; Granule Congregation ; Granule Convergence ; Microtubule Organizing Center Polarization ; Perforin ; Granulysin ; Biology
    ISSN: 2211-1247
    E-ISSN: 2211-1247
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Nat Commun, 2018, Vol.9(1), pp.751-751
    Description: Natural killer (NK) cells use the activating receptor NKp30 as a microbial pattern-recognition receptor to recognize, activate cytolytic pathways, and directly kill the fungi Cryptococcus neoformans and Candida albicans. However, the fungal pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) that triggers NKp30-mediated killing remains to be identified. Here we show that β-1,3-glucan, a component of the fungal cell wall, binds to NKp30. We further demonstrate that β-1,3-glucan stimulates granule convergence and polarization, as shown by live cell imaging. Through Src Family Kinase signaling, β-1,3-glucan increases expression and clustering of NKp30 at the microbial and NK cell synapse to induce perforin release for fungal cytotoxicity. Rather than blocking the interaction between fungi and NK cells, soluble β-1,3-glucan enhances fungal killing and restores defective cryptococcal killing by NK cells from HIV-positive individuals, implicating β-1,3-glucan to be both an activating ligand and a soluble PAMP that shapes NK cell host immunity.
    Keywords: Article;
    ISSN: 2041-1723
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Neoplasia, December 2008, Vol.10(12), pp.1402-1410
    Description: Prolonged treatment of leukemic cells with chemotherapeutic agents frequently results in development of drug resistance. Moreover, selection of drug-resistant cell populations may be associated with changes in malignant properties such as proliferation rate, invasiveness, and immunogenicity. In the present study, the sensitivity of cytarabine (1-β- -arabinofuranosylcytosine, araC)-resistant and parental human leukemic cell lines (T-lymphoid H9 and acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia Molt-4) to natural killer (NK) cell-mediated killing was investigated. The results obtained demonstrate that araC-resistant H9 and Molt-4 (H9 ARAC and Molt-4 ARAC ) cell lines are more sensitive to NK cell-mediated lysis than their respective parental cell lines. This increased sensitivity was associated with a higher surface expression of ligands for the NK cell-activating receptor NKG2D, notably UL16 binding protein-2 (ULBP-2) and ULBP-3 in H9 ARAC and Molt-4 ARAC cell lines. Blocking ULBP-2 and ULBP-3 or NKG2D with monoclonal antibody completely abrogated NK cell lysis. Constitutive phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) but not pAKT was higher in araC-resistant cells than in parental cell lines. Inhibition of ERK using ERK inhibitor PD98059 decreased both ULBP-2/ULBP-3 expression and NK cell cytotoxicity. Furthermore, overexpression of constitutively active ERK in H9 parental cells resulted in increased ULBP-2/ULBP-3 expression and enhanced NK cell lysis. These results demonstrate that increased sensitivity of araC-resistant leukemic cells to NK cell lysis is caused by higher NKG2D ligand expression, resulting from more active ERK signaling pathway.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 1476-5586
    E-ISSN: 1476-5586
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