Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • ECONIS (ZBW)  (696)
Type of Medium
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Human Relations, July 2013, Vol.66(7), pp.973-992
    Description: Theories that explain employees’ positive emotional, cognitive, and behavioral responses to fair procedures rely on control and relational processes. In the present study, we build on these models, but reverse this perspective to examine when leaders provide voice opportunities in their interactions with employees. We argued that leaders may take care of employees’ perceived individual control needs (which influence their own outcomes) by granting them voice. However, this will be the case particularly when leaders perceive that this employee also wants to belong to the organization, because this makes it more likely that employees will use their voice in a way that does not hurt the organization’s interest. Support for this predicted interaction effect was found in a laboratory experiment and a multisource field study. This research is among the first to identify factors that influence whether leaders will be more likely to act fairly, thus integrating procedural justice processes in the leadership literature.
    Keywords: Leadership ; Need to Belong ; Need for Control ; Procedural Fairness ; Voice ; Social Sciences (General)
    ISSN: 0018-7267
    E-ISSN: 1741-282X
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Economic Psychology, 2010, Vol.31(6), pp.843-848
    Description: Prior research has largely failed to focus on how transgressors can promote trust when having made unfair offers in bargaining. I investigated in the context of receiving an unfair offer in a dictator game when financial compensations and when apologies are most effective in motivating trust behavior by the violated party. I hypothesized that when losses were allocated, the violated party would be motivated to show more trust behavior towards the transgressor when a financial compensation (resulting again in equal final outcomes) relative to an apology was delivered, whereas when gains were allocated, apologies would be more effective in promoting trust behavior than a financial compensation. Results from a laboratory study indeed supported this prediction as such demonstrating the importance of how allocation decisions are framed (i.e., loss or gain) in testing the effectiveness of trust repair strategies (financial compensations vs. apologies).
    Keywords: Ultimatum Bargaining ; Trust Repair ; Trust Game ; Apologies ; Financial Compensations ; Gains ; Losses ; Business ; Psychology ; Economics
    ISSN: 0167-4870
    E-ISSN: 1872-7719
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 2011, Vol.114(2), pp.75-86
    Description: Trust is vital yet vulnerable in economic exchange relations. In these relations, a widely used strategy in response to distributive harm consists of having the transgressor pay a financial compensation to the victim. This research examines whether financial compensations can increase trust towards a transgressor, and whether the size of the compensation is relevant to this process. We hypothesized and found that whether larger compensations will elicit more trust, depends on how clear the perpetrator’s intention to transgress was. Experiment 1 revealed that trust perceptions increased more by a slight overcompensation of the inflicted harm as compared to an exact or a partial compensation, but not if the transgressor’s bad intentions became clear through the use of deception in the violation. In Experiments 2 and 3, we replicated these findings and further showed that it is not the use of deception per se, but rather the attribution of bad intent that moderates the effect of compensation size. Experiment 4, using a trust game paradigm revealed that this effect not only occurs for small overcompensations, but also for larger overcompensations.
    Keywords: Trust ; Trust Repair ; Trust Restoration ; Equality ; Dictator Game ; Trust Game ; Compensation ; Business ; Psychology
    ISSN: 0749-5978
    E-ISSN: 1095-9920
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, March 2012, Vol.117(2), pp.235-248
    Description: ► We integrate empowering leadership into relational fairness models. ► Encouraging self-development instilled a wish for status information in a lab study. ► It also strengthened the procedural fairness–OCB link, via status, in a field study. ► Encouraging independent action decreased the desire for status information. ► It also weakened the procedural fairness-OCB link, via status. We examined how procedural fairness interacts with empowering leadership to promote employee OCB. We focused on two core empowering leadership types— and . An experiment revealed that leaders encouraging self-development made employees desire status information more (i.e., information regarding one’s value to the organization). Conversely, leaders encouraging independent action decreased employees’ desire for this type of information. Subsequently, a multisource field study (with a US and German sample) showed that encouraging self-development strengthened the relationship between procedural fairness and employee OCB, and this relationship was mediated by employees’ self-perceived status. Conversely, encouraging independent action weakened the procedural fairness-OCB relationship, as mediated by self-perceived status. This research integrates empowering leadership styles into relational fairness theories, highlighting that multiple leader behaviors should be examined in concert and that empowering leadership can have unintended consequences.
    Keywords: Justice ; Procedural Justice ; Fairness ; Empowerment ; Empowering Leadership ; Organization Citizenship Behavior ; Autonomy ; Self-Development ; Business ; Psychology
    ISSN: 0749-5978
    E-ISSN: 1095-9920
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: The Leadership Quarterly, October 2015, Vol.26(5), pp.878-891
    Description: All normative leadership theories suggest that disciplining followers that transgress moral norms is a crucial leadership task. However, leaders sometimes yet fail to do so. Previous research has indicated that leaders may refrain from enacting discipline out of self-interest or from concern for the organization’s interest. We explore another option: leaders may simply be unwilling to enforce moral norms because of a negative attitude towards them. We argue and show that leaders that construe norms on relatively low (i.e. concrete) levels are likely to see norms as annoying obstacles, whereas leaders that construe moral norms on high (i.e. abstract) levels will have a more positive view of norms. In line with this, high construal level leaders are likely to be willing to enforce moral norms through discipline in response to follower moral transgressions. Low construal level leaders, in contrast, actively avoid doing so. We show this effect in different contexts and for different types of leader discipline.
    Keywords: Leader Disciplinary Behavior ; Leader Cognition ; Construal Level Theory ; Intentionality ; Business ; Political Science
    ISSN: 1048-9843
    E-ISSN: 1873-3409
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Economic Psychology, June 2011, Vol.32(3), pp.468-479
    Description: ► We examine when denying responsibility and apologizing make unfair ultimatum offers accepted. ► We tested our ideas in two ultimatum bargaining experiments. ► Denying promoted acceptance when recipients responded to uncertainty with low stress. Apologizing promoted acceptance when recipients responded with high stress. ► This interaction was limited to recipients interacting with a high power allocator. ► The perspective of victims of unfairness helps us understand how social accounts work. We examined which type of social account (denying responsibility versus apologizing) following an unfair offer makes recipients more likely to accept the offer in ultimatum bargaining. We identified stress responses to uncertainty as an individual difference factor that should moderate the relative effectiveness of these social accounts. A denial should make acceptance of an unfair offer more likely among recipients who respond to uncertainty with low stress. An apology should make such acceptance more likely among recipients who respond with high stress. Further, we argued that this cross-over interaction should be observed particularly among recipients interacting with a high power allocator. Two ultimatum bargaining experiments supported these ideas. Employing the perspective of victims of unfairness, the present research identifies a relevant individual difference moderator of the effectiveness of social accounts in bargaining situations and identifies power as a situational variable that promotes the expression of this factor.
    Keywords: Bargaining ; Ultimatum Bargaining ; Social Accounts ; Power ; Stress ; Uncertainty ; Business ; Psychology ; Economics
    ISSN: 0167-4870
    E-ISSN: 1872-7719
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Business Ethics, 2014, Vol.123(1), pp.71-84
    Description: Studies in the behavioral ethics and moral psychology traditions have begun to reveal the important roles of self-related processes that underlie moral behavior. Unfortunately, this research has resulted in two distinct and opposing streams of findings that are usually referred to as moral consistency and moral compensation. Moral consistency research shows that a salient self-concept as a moral person promotes moral behavior. Conversely, moral compensation research reveals that a salient self-concept as an immoral person promotes moral behavior. This study’s aim was to integrate these two literatures. We argued that compensation forms a reactive, “damage control” response in social situations, whereas consistency derives from a more proactive approach to reputation building and maintenance. Two experiments supported this prediction in showing that cognitive depletion (i.e., resulting in a reactive approach) results in moral compensation whereas consistency results when cognitive resources are available (i.e., resulting in a proactive approach). Experiment 2 revealed that these processes originate from reputational (rather than moral) considerations by showing that they emerge only under conditions of accountability. It can thus be concluded that reputational concerns are important for both moral compensation and moral consistency processes, and that which of these two prevails depends on the perspective that people take: a reactive or a proactive approach.
    Keywords: Accountability ; Moral compensation ; Moral consistency ; Moral licensing ; Moral self-regulation ; Prosocial behavior
    ISSN: 0167-4544
    E-ISSN: 1573-0697
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Business Ethics, 2017, Vol.145(3), pp.659-670
    Description: A growing body of research has started to examine how individuals from different countries may differ in their use of ethically questionable tactics during business negotiations. Whereas prior research focused on the main effect of the national culture or nationality of the negotiator, we add a new factor, which is the nationality of the counterpart. Looking at both these variables allows us to examine whether and how people may change their likelihood of using ethically questionable tactics in inter-cultural negotiations as opposed to intra-cultural ones. Results of an experiment ( N  = 810) show that overall, American participants were less likely than Chinese participants to use ethically questionable tactics in negotiations. However, American participants were more likely to use ethically questionable tactics, particularly those related to false promises and inappropriate information gathering, in inter-cultural negotiations with Chinese counterparts, than in intra-cultural negotiations with American counterparts. By contrast, Chinese participants were less likely to use ethically questionable tactics, particularly those related to false promises and attacking opponent’s network, in inter-cultural negotiations with American counterparts, than in intra-cultural negotiations with Chinese counterparts. Implications and future directions are discussed.
    Keywords: Ethically questionable tactics ; Intra-cultural negotiations ; Inter-cultural negotiations ; Americans ; Chinese
    ISSN: 0167-4544
    E-ISSN: 1573-0697
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Organizational behavior and human decision processes : a journal of fundamental research and theory in applied psychology, 2012, Vol.117(1), pp. 24-40
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.obhdp.2011.07.003 Byline: David M. Mayer (a), Stefan Thau (b), Kristina M. Workman (a), Marius Van Dijke (c), David De Cremer (c) Keywords: Leadership; Deviance; Self; Uncertainty; Competence Abstract: a* Leader mistreatment is positively related to employee hostility and deviance. a* Employee competence uncertainty moderates these relationships. a* Employee hostility mediates this interactive effect. Author Affiliation: (a) University of Michigan, Department of Management and Organizations, Ross School of Business, 701 Tappan St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States (b) London Business School, Organizational Behavior Subject Area, Regent's Park, London NW1 4SA, United Kingdom (c) Erasmus University, Rotterdam School of Management, The Netherlands Article History: Received 2 February 2010; Accepted 24 July 2011
    Keywords: Führungsstil ; Arbeitsverhalten ; Austauschtheorie ; Feldforschung
    ISSN: 07495978
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Business Ethics, 2013, Vol.113(1), pp.133-145
    Description: We investigate how social comparison processes in leader treatment quality impact group members’ self-worth, affect, and behavior. Evidences from the field and the laboratory suggest that employees who are treated kinder and more considerate than their fellow group members experience more self-worth and positive affect. Moreover, the greater positive self-implications of preferentially treated group members motivate them more strongly to comply with norms and to engage in tasks that benefit the group. These findings suggest that leaders face an ethical trade-off between satisfying the moral standard of treating everybody equally well and satisfying individual group members’ desire to be treated better than others.
    Keywords: Group value model ; Leadership ; Norm compliance ; Social comparison ; Status ; Affect
    ISSN: 0167-4544
    E-ISSN: 1573-0697
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages