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  • Health Reference Center Academic (Gale)  (12)
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, June 1, 2008, Vol.197(11), p.1531(6)
    Description: 〈p〉Haemophilus ducreyi 35000HP contains a cluster of homologues of genes required for the synthesis of enterobacterial common antigen (ECA), suggesting that H. ducreyi may express a putative ECA-like glycoconjugate. WecA initiates the synthesis of ECA by transferring N-acetylglucosamine to undecaprenyl-P, to form lipid I. A wecA mutant (35000HPwecA) was constructed, and 5 volunteers were inoculated at 3 sites with fixed doses of 35000HP on one arm and at 3 sites with varying doses of 35000HPwecA on the other arm. 35000HPwecA caused pustules to form at 3 sites inoculated with a dose 2.5-fold higher than that of 35000HP. However, at sites inoculated with similar doses of 35000HP and 35000HPwecA, pustules developed at 46.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 23.3%-70.0%) of 15 parent-strain sites and at 8.3% (95% CI, 0.01%-23.6%) of 12 mutant-strain sites (P = .013). Thus, the expression of wee A contributes to the ability of H. ducreyi to cause pustules in humans.〈/p〉
    Keywords: Hemophilus Infections -- Development And Progression ; Virulence (Microbiology) -- Research ; Chancroid -- Development And Progression ; Chancroid -- Research
    ISSN: 0022-1899
    E-ISSN: 15376613
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: BMC Microbiology, Sept 22, 2011, Vol.11, p.208
    Description: Background Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease chancroid, contains a flp (fimbria like protein) operon that encodes proteins predicted to contribute to adherence and pathogenesis. H. ducreyi mutants that lack expression of Flp1 and Flp2 or TadA, which has homology to NTPases of type IV secretion systems, have decreased abilities to attach to and form microcolonies on human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF). A tadA mutant is attenuated in its ability to cause disease in human volunteers and in the temperature dependent rabbit model, but a flp1flp2 mutant is virulent in rabbits. Whether a flp deletion mutant would cause disease in humans is not clear. Results We constructed 35000HP[DELTA]flp1-3, a deletion mutant that lacks expression of all three Flp proteins but has an intact tad secretion system. 35000HP[DELTA]flp1-3 was impaired in its ability to form microcolonies and to attach to HFF in vitro when compared to its parent (35000HP). Complementation of the mutant with flp1-3 in trans restored the parental phenotype. To test whether expression of Flp1-3 was necessary for virulence in humans, ten healthy adult volunteers were experimentally infected with a fixed dose of 35000HP (ranging from 54 to 67 CFU) on one arm and three doses of 35000HP[DELTA]flp1-3 (ranging from 63 to 961 CFU) on the other arm. The overall papule formation rate for the parent was 80% (95% confidence interval, CI, 55.2%-99.9%) and for the mutant was 70.0% (95% CI, 50.5%-89.5%) (P = 0.52). Mutant papules were significantly smaller (mean, 11.2 mm.sup.2.sup.) than were parent papules (21.8 mm.sup.2.sup.) 24 h after inoculation (P = 0.018). The overall pustule formation rates were 46.7% (95% CI 23.7-69.7%) at 30 parent sites and 6.7% (95% CI, 0.1-19.1%) at 30 mutant sites (P = 0.001). Conclusion These data suggest that production and secretion of the Flp proteins contributes to microcolony formation and attachment to HFF cells in vitro. Expression of flp1-3 is also necessary for H. ducreyi to initiate disease and progress to pustule formation in humans. Future studies will focus on how Flp proteins contribute to microcolony formation and attachment in vivo.
    Keywords: Hemophilus Infections -- Genetic Aspects ; Hemophilus Infections -- Health Aspects ; Hemophilus Infections -- Research
    ISSN: 1471-2180
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: BMC Molecular Biology, Nov 11, 2008, Vol.9(101), p.101
    Description: Background Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a gram-negative bacterium that causes otitis media in children as well as other infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract in children and adults. We are employing genetic strategies to identify and characterize virulence determinants in NTHi. NTHi is naturally competent for transformation and thus construction of most mutants by common methodologies is relatively straightforward. However, new methodology was required in order to construct unmarked non-polar mutations in poorly expressed genes whose products are required for transformation. We have adapted the lambda red/FLP-recombinase-mediated strategy used in E. coli for use in NTHi. Results A cassette containing a spectinomycin resistance gene and an rpsL gene flanked by FRT sites was constructed. A PCR amplicon containing 50 base pairs of DNA homologous to the 5' and 3' ends of the gene to be disrupted and the cassette was generated, then recombineered into the target NTHi gene, cloned on a plasmid, using the lambda recombination proteins expressed in E. coli DY380. Thus, the gene of interest was replaced by the cassette. The construct was then transformed into a streptomycin resistant NTHi strain and mutants were selected on spectinomycin-containing growth media. A plasmid derived from pLS88 with a temperature sensitive replicon expressing the FLP recombinase gene under the control of the tet operator/repressor was constructed. This plasmid was electroporated into the NTHi mutant at the permissive temperature and FLP expression was induced using anhydrotetracycline. The recombinase recognizes the FRT sites and eliminates the antibiotic cassette by site-specific recombination, creating the unmarked non-polar mutation. The plasmid is cured by growth of cells at the restrictive temperature. Conclusion The products of the genes in the NTHi pilABCD operon are required for type IV pilus biogenesis and have a role in transformation. We demonstrated the utility of our methodology by the construction of a non-polar pilA mutation in NTHi strain 2019 and complementation of the mutation with a plasmid containing the pilA gene. Utilization of this approach allowed us to readily generate unmarked non-polar mutations in NTHi genes.
    Keywords: Haemophilus Influenzae -- Genetic Aspects ; Haemophilus Influenzae -- Research ; Gene Mutation -- Research ; Genetic Testing -- Methods ; Genetic Testing -- Research
    ISSN: 1471-2199
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, August 26, 2014, Vol.9(8)
    Description: Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) are Gram-negative commensal bacteria that reside in the nasopharynx. NTHi can also cause multiple upper and lower respiratory tract diseases that include sinusitis, conjunctivitis, bronchitis, and otitis media. In numerous bacterial species the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) acts as a global regulator of iron homeostasis by negatively regulating the expression of iron uptake systems. However in NTHi strain 86-028NP and numerous other bacterial species there are multiple instances where Fur positively affects gene expression. It is known that many instances of positive regulation by Fur occur indirectly through a small RNA intermediate. However, no examples of small RNAs have been described in NTHi. Therefore we used RNA-Seq analysis to analyze the transcriptome of NTHi strain 86-028NPrpsL and an isogenic 86-028NPrpsL[DELTA]fur strain to identify Fur-regulated intergenic transcripts. From this analysis we identified HrrF, the first small RNA described in any Haemophilus species. Orthologues of this small RNA exist only among other Pasteurellaceae. Our analysis showed that HrrF is maximally expressed when iron levels are low. Additionally, Fur was shown to bind upstream of the hrrF promoter. RNA-Seq analysis was used to identify targets of HrrF which include genes whose products are involved in molybdate uptake, deoxyribonucleotide synthesis, and amino acid biosynthesis. The stability of HrrF is not dependent on the RNA chaperone Hfq. This study is the first step in an effort to investigate the role small RNAs play in altering gene expression in response to iron limitation in NTHi.
    Keywords: Hemophilus Infections -- Analysis ; Bacteria -- Analysis ; Rna -- Analysis ; Gene Expression -- Analysis
    ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Molecular microbiology, 2007, Vol.66(1), pp.26-39
    Description: Virulence of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is dependent on the decoration of lipooligosaccharide with sialic acid. This sugar must be derived from the host, as NTHi cannot synthesize sialic acids. NTHi can also use sialic acid as a carbon source. The genes encoding the sialic acid transporter and the genes encoding the catabolic activities are localized to two divergently transcribed operons, the siaPT operon and the nan operon respectively. In this study, we identified SiaR as a repressor of sialic acid transport and catabolism in NTHi. Inactivation of siaR resulted in the unregulated expression of the genes in both operons. Unregulated catabolism of sialic acid in the siaR mutant resulted in the reduction of surface sialylation and an increase in serum sensitivity. In addition to SiaR-mediated repression, CRP, the cAMP receptor protein, was shown to activate expression of the siaPT operon but not the nan operon. We describe a model in which SiaR and CRP work to modulate intracellular sialic acid levels. Our results demonstrate the importance of SiaR-mediated regulation to balance the requirement of surface sialylation and the toxic accumulation of intracellular sialic acid. ; Includes references ; p. 26-39.
    Keywords: Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate;
    ISSN: 0950-382X
    E-ISSN: 13652958
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, March 19, 2013, Vol.8(3), p.e59388
    Description: Type VI secretion systems (T6SS) are a class of macromolecular secretion machines that are utilized by a number of bacteria for inter-bacterial competition or to elicit responses in eukaryotic cells. Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen that causes severe infections in humans. These infections, including pneumonia and bacteremia, are important, as they are often associated with hospitals and medical-settings where they disproportionally affect critically ill patients like those residing in intensive care units. While it is known that A. baumannii genomes carry genes whose predicted products have homology with T6SS-associated gene products from other bacteria, and secretion of a major T6SS structural protein Hcp has been demonstrated, no additional work on an A. baumannii T6SS has been reported. Herein, we demonstrated that A. baumannii strain M2 secretes Hcp and this secretion was dependent upon TssB, an ortholog of a bacteriophage contractile sheath protein, confirming that strain M2 produces a functional T6SS. Additionally, we demonstrated that the ability of strain M2 to out-compete Escherichia coli was reliant upon the products of tssB and hcp. Collectively, our data have provided the first evidence demonstrating function in inter-bacterial competition, for a T6SS produced by A. baumannii.
    Keywords: Genomes -- Health Aspects ; Bacteria -- Health Aspects ; Escherichia Coli -- Health Aspects ; Genomics -- Health Aspects
    ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, Oct 5, 2011, Vol.6(10), p.e25923
    Description: Strains of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae show enormous genetic heterogeneity and display differential virulence potential in different clinical settings. The igaB gene, which encodes a newly identified IgA protease, is more likely to be present in the genome of COPD strains of H. influenzae than in otitis media strains. Analysis of igaB and surrounding sequences in the present study showed that H. influenzae likely acquired igaB from Neisseria meningitidis and that the acquisition was accompanied by a ~20 kb genomic inversion that is present only in strains that have igaB. As part of a long running prospective study of COPD, molecular typing of H. influenzae strains identified a clonally related group of strains, a surprising observation given the genetic heterogeneity that characterizes strains of nontypeable H. influenzae. Analysis of strains by 5 independent methods (polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, multilocus sequence typing, igaB gene sequences, P2 gene sequences, pulsed field gel electrophoresis) established the clonal relationship among the strains. Analysis of 134 independent strains collected prospectively from a cohort of adults with COPD demonstrated that ~10% belonged to the clonal group. We conclude that a clonally related group of strains of nontypeable H. influenzae that has two IgA1 protease genes (iga and igaB) is adapted for colonization and infection in COPD. This observation has important implications in understanding population dynamics of H. influenzae in human infection and in understanding virulence mechanisms specifically in the setting of COPD.
    Keywords: Genomes -- Analysis ; Genomes -- Health Aspects ; Proteases -- Analysis ; Proteases -- Health Aspects ; Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease -- Analysis ; Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease -- Health Aspects ; Immunoglobulin A -- Analysis ; Immunoglobulin A -- Health Aspects ; Virulence (Microbiology) -- Analysis ; Virulence (Microbiology) -- Health Aspects ; Hemophilus Infections -- Analysis ; Hemophilus Infections -- Health Aspects ; Genes -- Analysis ; Genes -- Health Aspects ; Genomics -- Analysis ; Genomics -- Health Aspects
    ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, July 23, 2013, Vol.8(7), p.e70448
    Description: The formation of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms contributes to persistent contamination in food processing facilities. A microarray comparison of L. monocytogenes between the transcriptome of the strong biofilm forming strain (Bfm.sup.s) Scott A and the weak biofilm forming (Bfm.sup.w) strain F2365 was conducted to identify genes potentially involved in biofilm formation. Among 951 genes with significant difference in expression between the two strains, a GntR-family response regulator encoding gene (LMOf2365_0414), designated lbrA, was found to be highly expressed in Scott A relative to F2365. A Scott A lbrA-deletion mutant, designated AW3, formed biofilm to a much lesser extent as compared to the parent strain by a rapid attachment assay and scanning electron microscopy. Complementation with lbrA from Scott A restored the Bfm.sup.s phenotype in the AW3 derivative. A second microarray assessment using the lbrA deletion mutant AW3 and the wild type Scott A revealed a total of 304 genes with expression significantly different between the two strains, indicating the potential regulatory role of LbrA in L. monocytogenes. A cloned copy of Scott A lbrA was unable to confer enhanced biofilm forming potential in F2365, suggesting that additional factors contributed to weak biofilm formation by F2365.
    Keywords: Food Processing Plants -- Comparative Analysis ; Food Contamination -- Comparative Analysis ; Listeria -- Comparative Analysis
    ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Nature, May 28, 2009, Vol.459(7246), p.569(5)
    Description: Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are childhood neurodevelopmental disorders with complex genetic origins(1-4). Previous studies focusing on candidate genes or genomic regions have identified several copy number variations (CNVs) that are associated with an increased risk of ASDs(5-9). Here we present the results from a whole-genome CNV study on a cohort of 859 ASD cases and 1,409 healthy children of European ancestry who were genotyped with 550,000 single nucleotide polymorphism markers, in an attempt to comprehensively identify CNVs conferring susceptibility to ASDs. Positive findings were evaluated in an independent cohort of 1,336 ASD cases and 1,110 controls of European ancestry. Besides previously reported ASD candidate genes, such as NRXNI (ref. 10) and CNTN4 (refs 11, 12), several new susceptibility genes encoding neuronal cell-adhesion molecules, including NLGNI and ASTN2, were enriched with CNVs in ASD cases compared to controls (P = 9.5 x [10.sup.-3]). Furthermore, CNVs within or surrounding genes involved in the ubiquitin pathways, including UBE3A, PARKZ RFWD2 and FBX040, were affected by CNVs not observed in controls (P= 3.3 x [10.sup.-3]). We also identified duplications 55 kilobases upstream of complementary DNA AK123120 (P=3.6 x [10.sup.-6]). Although these variants may be individually rare, they target genes involved in neuronal cell-adhesion or ubiquitin degradation, indicating that these two important gene networks expressed within the central nervous system may contribute to the genetic susceptibility of ASD.
    Keywords: Autism -- Genetic Aspects ; Ubiquitin -- Properties ; Neurons -- Properties
    ISSN: 0028-0836
    E-ISSN: 14764687
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Nature, May 28, 2009, Vol.459(7246), p.528(6)
    Description: Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) represent a group of childhood neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by deficits in verbal communication, impairment of social interaction, and restricted and repetitive patterns of interests and behaviour. To identify common genetic risk factors underlying ASDs, here we present the results of genome-wide association studies on a cohort of 780 families (3,101 subjects) with affected children, and a second cohort of 1,204 affected subjects and 6,491 control subjects, all of whom were of European ancestry. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms between cadherin 10 (CDH10) and cadherin 9 (CDH9)-two genes encoding neuronal cell-adhesion molecules-revealed strong association signals, with the most significant SNP being rs4307059 (P = 3.4 times 10 super(-8), odds ratio = 1.19). These signals were replicated in two independent cohorts, with combined P values ranging from 7.4 times 10 super(-8) to 2.1 times 10 super(-10). Our results implicate neuronal cell-adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of ASDs, and represent, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of genome-wide significant association of common variants with susceptibility to ASDs.
    Keywords: Pervasive Developmental Disorders -- Genetic Aspects ; Pervasive Developmental Disorders -- Risk Factors ; Genetic Research
    ISSN: 0028-0836
    E-ISSN: 14764687
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