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Berlin Brandenburg

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  • 1
    In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 2013, Vol. 86(1), pp.3-14
    Description: Microbial communities in soil reside in a highly heterogeneous habitat where diverse mineral surfaces, complex organic matter and microorganisms interact with each other. This study aimed to elucidate the long-term effect of the soil mineral composition and charcoal on the microbial community composition established in matured artificial soils and their response to phenanthrene. One year after adding sterile manure to different artificial soils and inoculating microorganisms from a Cambisol, the matured soils were spiked with phenanthrene or not and incubated for another 70 days. 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer fragments amplified from total community DNA were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Metal oxides and clay minerals and to a lesser extent charcoal influenced the microbial community composition. Changes in the bacterial community composition in response to phenanthrene differed depending on the mineral composition and presence of charcoal, while no shifts in the fungal community composition were observed. The abundance of ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase genes was increased in phenanthrene-spiked soils except for charcoal-containing soils. Here we show that the formation of biogeochemical interfaces in soil is an ongoing process and that different properties present in artificial soils influenced the bacterial response to the phenanthrene spike.
    Keywords: Artificial Soils ; Rhdα Genes ; 16s Rrna Genes ; Its ; Dgge
    ISSN: 01686496
    E-ISSN: 1574-6941
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 01 January 2018, Vol.13(4), p.e0195345
    Description: Fungal communities in agricultural soils are assumed to be affected by soil and crop management. Our intention was to investigate the impact of different tillage and fertilization practices on fungal communities in a long-term crop rotation field trial established in 1992 in Central Germany. Two winter wheat fields in replicated strip-tillage design, comprising conventional vs. conservation tillage, intensive vs. extensive fertilization and different pre-crops (maize vs. rapeseed) were analyzed by a metabarcoding approach applying Illumina paired-end sequencing of amplicons generated by two recently developed primer pairs targeting the two fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer regions (ITS1, ITS2). Analysis of 5.1 million high-quality sequence reads uncovered a diverse fungal community in the two fields, composed of 296 fungal genera including 3,398 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) at the 97% sequence similarity threshold. Both primer pairs detected the same fungal phyla (Basidio-, Asco-, Zygo-, Glomero- and Chytridiomycota), but in different relative abundances. OTU richness was higher in the ITS1 dataset, while ITS2 data were more diverse and of higher evenness. Effects of farming practice on fungal community structures were revealed. Almost two-thirds of the fungal genera were represented in all different soil treatments, whereas the remaining genera clearly responded to farming practice. Principal Component Analysis revealed four distinct clusters according to tillage practice and pre-crop. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) substantiated the results and proved significant influences of tillage and pre-crop, while fertilization had the smallest and non-significant effect. In-depth analysis of putative phytopathogenic and plant beneficial fungal groups indicated distinct responses; for example Fusarium was significantly enriched in the intensively fertilized conservation tillage variants with the pre-crop maize, while Phoma displayed significant association with conventional tillage and pre-crop rapeseed. Many putative plant beneficial fungi also reacted differentially to farming practice with the most distinct responders identified among the Glomeromycota (arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, AMF).
    Keywords: Sciences (General)
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 3
    In: PLoS ONE, 2014, Vol.9(9)
    Description: The fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil is determined by a suite of biotic and abiotic factors, and disentangling their role in the complex soil interaction network remains challenging. Here, we investigate the influence of soil composition on the microbial community structure and its response to the spiked model PAH compound phenanthrene and plant litter. We used long-term matured artificial soils differing in type of clay mineral (illite, montmorillonite) and presence of charcoal or ferrihydrite. The soils received an identical soil microbial fraction and were incubated for more than two years with two sterile manure additions. The matured artificial soils and a natural soil were subjected to the following spiking treatments: (I) phenanthrene, (II) litter, (III) litter + phenanthrene, (IV) unspiked control. Total community DNA was extracted from soil sampled on the day of spiking, 7, 21, and 63 days after spiking. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene and fungal internal transcribed spacer amplicons were quantified by qPCR and subjected to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). DGGE analysis revealed that the bacterial community composition, which was strongly shaped by clay minerals after more than two years of incubation, changed in response to spiked phenanthrene and added litter. DGGE and qPCR showed that soil composition significantly influenced the microbial response to spiking. While fungal communities responded only in presence of litter to phenanthrene spiking, the response of the bacterial communities to phenanthrene was less pronounced when litter was present. Interestingly, microbial communities in all artificial soils were more strongly affected by spiking than in the natural soil, which might indicate the importance of higher microbial diversity to compensate perturbations. This study showed the influence of soil composition on the microbiota and their response to phenanthrene and litter, which may increase our understanding of complex interactions in soils for bioremediation applications.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Ecology And Environmental Sciences
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Frontiers in Microbiology, 01 February 2018, Vol.9
    Description: Biocontrol inoculants often show inconsistency in their efficacy at field scale and the reason for this remains often unclear. A high rhizosphere competence of inoculant strains is assumed to be a key factor for successful biocontrol effects as the biocontrol strain has to compete with the indigenous microbial community in the rhizosphere. It is known that many factors, among them plant species and soil type shape the rhizosphere microbial community composition. However, microbial community composition in the rhizosphere can also be influenced by the presence of a pathogen. We hypothesized that plant species, soil type, and a pathogen affect the rhizosphere competence of a biocontrol strain and its biocontrol effect against a soil-borne pathogen. To test the hypothesis, we used an experimental plot system with three soil types (diluvial sand, alluvial loam, loess loam) kept under similar agricultural management at the same field site for 12 years. We investigate the rhizosphere competence of Pseudomonas sp. RU47 in two plant species (potato and lettuce) and its biocontrol effect against Rhizoctonia diseases. The colonization density of a rifampicin resistant mutant of RU47 in the rhizosphere of both crops was evaluated by plate counts. Bacterial community compositions were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from total community DNA. The inoculant RU47 was able to colonize the rhizosphere of both model crops in a sufficient density and to reduce disease severity of black scurf on potato and bottom rot on lettuce in all three soils. DGGE indicated that RU47 affected the bacterial community composition stronger in the rhizosphere of lettuce than in the potato rhizosphere. In contrast, the effect of the pathogen Rhizoctonia solani on the bacterial community was much stronger in the rhizosphere of potato than in the lettuce rhizosphere. A significant effect of RU47 on the Pseudomonas-specific gacA fingerprints of the rhizosphere was only observed in lettuce in alluvial soil. The soil type and plant species independent biocontrol effects of RU47 and its minor influence on the indigenous bacterial community composition might be important criteria for the registration and use of RU47 as biocontrol strain.
    Keywords: Rhizoctonia Solani ; Plant Health ; Biocontrol ; Plant Disease ; Bacterial Community ; Dgge ; Biology
    E-ISSN: 1664-302X
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  • 5
    In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 2013, Vol. 86(1), pp.15-25
    Description: To study the influence of the clay minerals montmorillonite (M) and illite (I), the metal oxides ferrihydrite (F) and aluminum hydroxide (A), and charcoal (C) on soil bacterial communities, seven artificial soils with identical texture provided by quartz (Q) were mixed with sterilized manure as organic carbon source before adding a microbial inoculant derived from a Cambisol. Bacterial communities established in artificial soils after 90 days of incubation were compared by DGGE analysis of bacterial and taxon-specific 16S rRNA gene amplicons. The bacterial community structure of charcoal-containing soils highly differed from the other soils at all taxonomic levels studied. Effects of montmorillonite and illite were observed for Bacteria and Betaproteobacteria , but not for Actinobacteria or Alphaproteobacteria . A weak influence of metal oxides on Betaproteobacteria was found. Barcoded pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons done for QM, QI, QIF, and QMC revealed a high bacterial diversity in the artificial soils. The composition of the artificial soils was different from the inoculant, and the structure of the bacterial communities established in QMC soil was most different from the other soils, suggesting that charcoal provided distinct microenvironments and biogeochemical interfaces formed. Several populations with discriminative relative abundance between artificial soils were identified.
    Keywords: Clay Minerals ; Charcoal ; Bacterial Communities ; 16s Rrna Gene ; Dgge ; Pyrosequencing
    ISSN: 01686496
    E-ISSN: 1574-6941
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  • 6
    In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 2013, Vol. 86(1), pp.85-100
    Description: Phenoxyacetic acids can be degraded by diverse soil microorganisms. Nevertheless, we miss information about the succession of 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) degraders in micro-environments of soils as well as specific functions of different microbial groups during MCPA degradation. We studied MCPA degradation at the soil–litter interface in a microcosm experiment and followed the succession of different degrader populations by quantifying the abundance of 16S rRNA genes as well as, the fungal ITS fragment and the functional genes tfdA (in total and divided into three classes) and cadA . Adjacent to the litter layer, a dynamic depletion zone of MCPA indicated that the litter effect on MCPA degradation depends on substrate availability and the affected soil volume. The increase of the tfdA class III and cadA genes was linked to MCPA mineralisation. Total abundance of tfdA genes was dominated by class I MCPA degraders and did not reflect MCPA degradation potential of the soil. Litter addition induced the development of pioneer and late-stage fungal communities, which were probably both involved in MCPA degradation. The results underline the importance of the ecological behaviour of different degrader populations for the understanding of herbicide degradation in soils.
    Keywords: Diversity ; 〈Kwd〉〈Italic〉Cada〈/Italic〉〈/Kwd〉 ; Taqman Probe - Based Qpcr ; Substrate Availability
    ISSN: 01686496
    E-ISSN: 1574-6941
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  • 7
    In: Environmental Microbiology, July 2019, Vol.21(7), pp.2426-2439
    Description: Long‐term agricultural fertilization strategies gradually change soil properties including the associated microbial communities. Cultivated crops recruit beneficial microbes from the surrounding soil environment root exudates. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of long‐term fertilization strategies across field sites on the rhizosphere prokaryotic ( and ) community composition and plant performance. We conducted growth chamber experiments with lettuce ( L.) cultivated in soils from two long‐term field experiments, each of which compared organic versus mineral fertilization strategies. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing revealed the assemblage of a rhizosphere core microbiota shared in all lettuce plants across soils, going beyond differences in community composition depending on field site and fertilization strategies. The enhanced expression of several plant genes with roles in oxidative and biotic stress signalling pathways in lettuce grown in soils with organic indicates an induced physiological status in plants. Lettuce plants grown in soils with different fertilization histories were visibly free of stress symptoms and achieved comparable biomass. This suggests a positive aboveground plant response to belowground plant–microbe interactions in the rhizosphere. Besides effects of fertilization strategy and field site, our results demonstrate the crucial role of the plant in driving rhizosphere microbiota assemblage.
    Keywords: Soil Microbiology – Physiological Aspects ; Soil Microbiology – Analysis ; Plant Genetics – Physiological Aspects ; Plant Genetics – Analysis ; Plants (Organisms) – Physiological Aspects ; Plants (Organisms) – Analysis ; Soil Ecology – Physiological Aspects ; Soil Ecology – Analysis ; Microbiota (Symbiotic Organisms) – Physiological Aspects ; Microbiota (Symbiotic Organisms) – Analysis ; RNA – Physiological Aspects ; RNA – Analysis;
    ISSN: 1462-2912
    E-ISSN: 1462-2920
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