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  • Article  (8)
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 25 August 2015, Vol.112(34), pp.E4772-81
    Description: Horizontal gene transfer via plasmid conjugation is a major driving force in microbial evolution but constitutes a complex process that requires synchronization with the physiological state of the host bacteria. Although several host transcription factors are known to regulate plasmid-borne transfer genes, RNA-based regulatory circuits for host-plasmid communication remain unknown. We describe a posttranscriptional mechanism whereby the Hfq-dependent small RNA, RprA, inhibits transfer of pSLT, the virulence plasmid of Salmonella enterica. RprA employs two separate seed-pairing domains to activate the mRNAs of both the sigma-factor σ(S) and the RicI protein, a previously uncharacterized membrane protein here shown to inhibit conjugation. Transcription of ricI requires σ(S) and, together, RprA and σ(S) orchestrate a coherent feedforward loop with AND-gate logic to tightly control the activation of RicI synthesis. RicI interacts with the conjugation apparatus protein TraV and limits plasmid transfer under membrane-damaging conditions. To our knowledge, this study reports the first small RNA-controlled feedforward loop relying on posttranscriptional activation of two independent targets and an unexpected role of the conserved RprA small RNA in controlling extrachromosomal DNA transfer.
    Keywords: Hfq ; Rpra ; Feedforward Control ; Plasmid Conjugation ; Srna ; Chromosomes, Bacterial ; DNA, Bacterial -- Genetics ; RNA, Bacterial -- Genetics ; Salmonella -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 23 November 2010, Vol.107(47), pp.20435-40
    Description: The abundant class of bacterial Hfq-associated small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) parallels animal microRNAs in their ability to control multiple genes at the posttranscriptional level by short and imperfect base pairing. In contrast to the universal length and seed pairing mechanism of microRNAs, the sRNAs are heterogeneous in size and structure, and how they regulate multiple targets is not well understood. This paper provides evidence that a 5' located sRNA domain is a critical element for the control of a large posttranscriptional regulon. We show that the conserved 5' end of RybB sRNA recognizes multiple mRNAs of Salmonella outer membrane proteins by ≥7-bp Watson-Crick pairing. When fused to an unrelated sRNA, the 5' domain is sufficient to guide target mRNA degradation and maintain σ(E)-dependent envelope homeostasis. RybB sites in mRNAs are often conserved and flanked by 3' adenosine. They are found in a wide sequence window ranging from the upstream untranslated region to the deep coding sequence, indicating that some targets might be repressed at the level of translation, whereas others are repressed primarily by mRNA destabilization. Autonomous 5' domains seem more common in sRNAs than appreciated and might improve the design of synthetic RNA regulators.
    Keywords: Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins -- Metabolism ; Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial -- Genetics ; RNA, Messenger -- Metabolism ; Regulatory Sequences, Ribonucleic Acid -- Genetics ; Regulon -- Genetics ; Salmonella -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: The Plant cell, January 2012, Vol.24(1), pp.123-36
    Description: Gene expression in plastids of higher plants is dependent on two different transcription machineries, a plastid-encoded bacterial-type RNA polymerase (PEP) and a nuclear-encoded phage-type RNA polymerase (NEP), which recognize distinct types of promoters. The division of labor between PEP and NEP during plastid development and in mature chloroplasts is unclear due to a lack of comprehensive information on promoter usage. Here, we present a thorough investigation into the distribution of PEP and NEP promoters within the plastid genome of barley (Hordeum vulgare). Using a novel differential RNA sequencing approach, which discriminates between primary and processed transcripts, we obtained a genome-wide map of transcription start sites in plastids of mature first leaves. PEP-lacking plastids of the albostrians mutant allowed for the unambiguous identification of NEP promoters. We observed that the chloroplast genome contains many more promoters than genes. According to our data, most genes (including genes coding for photosynthesis proteins) have both PEP and NEP promoters. We also detected numerous transcription start sites within operons, indicating transcriptional uncoupling of genes in polycistronic gene clusters. Moreover, we mapped many transcription start sites in intergenic regions and opposite to annotated genes, demonstrating the existence of numerous noncoding RNA candidates.
    Keywords: Chloroplasts -- Genetics ; DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases -- Metabolism ; Hordeum -- Enzymology ; Plastids -- Enzymology ; RNA, Untranslated -- Genetics
    ISSN: 10404651
    E-ISSN: 1532-298X
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Plant and Soil, 2010, Vol.332(1), pp.163-176
    Description: Water flow from soil to plants depends on the properties of the soil next to roots, the rhizosphere. Although several studies showed that the rhizosphere has different properties than the bulk soil, effects of the rhizosphere on root water uptake are commonly neglected. To investigate the rhizosphere’s properties we used neutron radiography to image water content distributions in soil samples planted with lupins during drying and subsequent rewetting. During drying, the water content in the rhizosphere was 0.05 larger than in the bulk soil. Immediately after rewetting, the picture reversed and the rhizosphere remained markedly dry. During the following days the water content of the rhizosphere increased and after 60 h it exceeded that of the bulk soil. The rhizosphere’s thickness was approximately 1.5 mm. Based on the observed dynamics, we derived the distinct, hysteretic and time-dependent water retention curve of the rhizosphere. Our hypothesis is that the rhizosphere’s water retention curve was determined by mucilage exuded by roots. The rhizosphere properties reduce water depletion around roots and weaken the drop of water potential towards roots, therefore favoring water uptake under dry conditions, as demonstrated by means of analytical calculation of water flow to a single root.
    Keywords: Root water uptake ; Water retention curve ; Rhizosphere ; Neutron radiography ; Mucilage ; Hysteresis
    ISSN: 0032-079X
    E-ISSN: 1573-5036
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 25 September 2007, Vol.104(39), pp.15376-81
    Description: Gab1 is a multiadaptor protein that has been shown to be required for multiple processes in embryonic development and oncogenic transformation. Gab1 functions by amplifying signal transduction downstream of various receptor tyrosine kinases through recruitment of multiple signaling effectors, including phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Shp2. Until now, the functional significance of individual interactions in vivo was not known. Here we have generated knockin mice that carry point mutations in either the P13K or Shp2 binding sites of Gab1. We show that different effector interactions with Gab1 play distinct biological roles downstream of Gab1 during the development of different organs. Recruitment of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase by Gab1 is essential for EGF receptor-mediated embryonic eyelid closure and keratinocyte migration, and the Gab1-Shp2 interaction is crucial for Met receptor-directed placental development and muscle progenitor cell migration to the limbs. Furthermore, we investigate the dual association of Gab1 with the Met receptor. By analyzing knockin mice with mutations in the Grb2 or Met binding site of Gab1, we show that the requirements for Gab1 recruitment to Met varies in different biological contexts. Either the direct or the indirect interaction of Gab1 with Met is sufficient for Met-dependent muscle precursor cell migration, whereas both modes of interaction are required and neither is sufficient for placenta development, liver growth, and palatal shelf closure. These data demonstrate that Gab1 induces different biological responses through the recruitment of distinct effectors and that different modes of recruitment for Gab1 are required in different organs.
    Keywords: Signal Transduction ; Erbb Receptors -- Metabolism ; Phosphoproteins -- Physiology ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins C-Met -- Physiology
    ISSN: 0027-8424
    E-ISSN: 10916490
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Plant physiology, December 2013, Vol.163(4), pp.1640-59
    Description: In apomictic Boechera spp., meiotic diplospory leads to the circumvention of meiosis and the suppression of recombination to produce unreduced male and female gametes (i.e. apomeiosis). Here, we have established an early flower developmental staging system and have performed microarray-based comparative gene expression analyses of the pollen mother cell stage in seven diploid sexual and seven diploid apomictic genotypes to identify candidate factors for unreduced pollen formation. We identified a transcript unique to apomictic Boechera spp. called UPGRADE2 (BspUPG2), which is highly up-regulated in their pollen mother cells. BspUPG2 is highly conserved among apomictic Boechera spp. genotypes but has no homolog in sexual Boechera spp. or in any other taxa. BspUPG2 undergoes posttranscriptional processing but lacks a prominent open reading frame. Together with the potential of stably forming microRNA-like secondary structures, we hypothesize that BspUPG2 functions as a long regulatory noncoding messenger RNA-like RNA. BspUPG2 has apparently arisen through a three-step process initiated by ancestral gene duplication of the original BspUPG1 locus, followed by sequential insertions of segmentally duplicated gene fragments, with final exonization of its sequence structure. Its genesis reflects the hybridization history that characterizes the genus Boechera.
    Keywords: Conserved Sequence ; Apomixis -- Genetics ; Brassicaceae -- Genetics ; Plant Proteins -- Genetics ; Pollen -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00320889
    E-ISSN: 1532-2548
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of infectious diseases, 01 March 2011, Vol.203(5), pp.595-601
    Description: Recently, a IL28B (rs 12979860) gene polymorphism was identified as a predictor for response to hepatitis C virus-specific treatment in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-uninfected and -infected patients with chronic hepatitis C. In an analysis of HIV-infected patients with acute hepatitis C, we found that the IL28B genotype was associated with serum levels of hepatitis C virus RNA, g-GT, and CD4 cell count. In contrast to HIV-infected patients with chronic hepatitis C, the IL28B genotype was not significantly associated with treatment response rates in patients with acute hepatitis C. Thus, effects of the IL28B single-nucleotide polymorphism may differ in HIV-infected patients with chronic and acute hepatitis C.
    Keywords: Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide ; HIV Infections -- Complications ; Hepatitis C -- Genetics ; Interleukins -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00221899
    E-ISSN: 1537-6613
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Environmental health perspectives, March 2009, Vol.117(3), pp.309-15
    Description: In their safety evaluations of bisphenol A (BPA), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and a counterpart in Europe, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), have given special prominence to two industry-funded studies that adhered to standards defined by Good Laboratory Practices (GLP). These same agencies have given much less weight in risk assessments to a large number of independently replicated non-GLP studies conducted with government funding by the leading experts in various fields of science from around the world. We reviewed differences between industry-funded GLP studies of BPA conducted by commercial laboratories for regulatory purposes and non-GLP studies conducted in academic and government laboratories to identify hazards and molecular mechanisms mediating adverse effects. We examined the methods and results in the GLP studies that were pivotal in the draft decision of the U.S. FDA declaring BPA safe in relation to findings from studies that were competitive for U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding, peer-reviewed for publication in leading journals, subject to independent replication, but rejected by the U.S. FDA for regulatory purposes. Although the U.S. FDA and EFSA have deemed two industry-funded GLP studies of BPA to be superior to hundreds of studies funded by the U.S. NIH and NIH counterparts in other countries, the GLP studies on which the agencies based their decisions have serious conceptual and methodologic flaws. In addition, the U.S. FDA and EFSA have mistakenly assumed that GLP yields valid and reliable scientific findings (i.e., "good science"). Their rationale for favoring GLP studies over hundreds of publically funded studies ignores the central factor in determining the reliability and validity of scientific findings, namely, independent replication, and use of the most appropriate and sensitive state-of-the-art assays, neither of which is an expectation of industry-funded GLP research. Public health decisions should be based on studies using appropriate protocols with appropriate controls and the most sensitive assays, not GLP. Relevant NIH-funded research using state-of-the-art techniques should play a prominent role in safety evaluations of chemicals.
    Keywords: FDA ; Food and Drug Administration ; Glp ; Bisphenol A ; Endocrine Disruptors ; Good Laboratory Practices ; Low-Dose ; Nonmonotonic ; Positive Control ; Clinical Laboratory Techniques -- Standards ; Ecotoxicology -- Methods ; Endocrine Disruptors -- Toxicity ; Phenols -- Toxicity ; Public Health Practice -- Standards
    ISSN: 00916765
    E-ISSN: 1552-9924
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