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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Forest Ecology and Management, 01 January 2016, Vol.359, pp.74-82
    Description: Harvesting and logging with heavy forest machines cause soil damage that may restrict forest soil functions. Although the recovery ability of compacted forest soils depends on the soil properties, little is known about the long-term structure recovery of different soils following forest operations. The aim of our study was to evaluate the soil structure recovery of three different soil types. Therefore, we applied a space-for-time substitution approach (10, 20, 30 and 40 years after the last machine impact) to study selected sites in Lower Saxony, Germany, using the following as proxies: bulk density, carbon dioxide (CO ) concentration in soil gas, and the relative apparent gas diffusion coefficient ( / ). At sites with high biological activity and high clay content (Cambisols on limestone), recovery occurred 10–20 years after last traffic impact. At these sites, 10 years after the last traffic impact, gas diffusivity at the wheel track was half of the gas diffusivity of the undisturbed soil, and soil gas CO concentrations were significantly higher at the wheel tracks. At the 20-, 30-, and 40-year-old skid trails, there were no significant differences between the untrafficked reference and the soil frequented by vehicles. Regardless of the kind of traffic impact (wheel track, mid line, side strip or undisturbed reference soil), all investigated parameters indicated that soil structure becomes more favourable with increasing time since the last forest interference. In contrast, loamy sandy soils (Podzols on glacial drift and sand) showed low recovery ability. Forty years after the last machine impact, gas diffusivity was still significantly reduced at the wheel track. Cambisols at loess-covered sandstone showed neither strong impact of forest traffic on soil structure nor changes in soil structure 20–40 years after last traffic impact. In general, bulk density turned out not to be a sufficient proxy for soil structure recovery.
    Keywords: Soil Gas Diffusivity ; Soil Carbon Dioxide ; Soil Compaction ; Soil Structure Recovery ; Forestry ; Biology
    ISSN: 0378-1127
    E-ISSN: 1872-7042
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, April 5, 2012, Vol.399, p.35(6)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfa.2012.02.021 Byline: Doreen Zirkler, Friederike Lang, Martin Kaupenjohann Keywords: Soil colloid; Vacuum filtration; Centrifugation; Particle size separation Abstract: Display Omitted Author Affiliation: TU Berlin, Department of Soil Science, Ernst-Reuter-Platz 1, 10587 Berlin, Germany Article History: Received 28 October 2011; Revised 2 February 2012; Accepted 17 February 2012
    ISSN: 0927-7757
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Forest Ecology and Management, 15 November 2015, Vol.356, pp.136-143
    Description: Phosphorus is an essential yet scarce macronutrient, and as such forest nutrition often relies on cycling of P between biomass and soils through litterfall and roots. For technical and soil protection reasons, modern harvesting systems create thick brash mats on skid trails by depositing residues, thus concentrating P there. What portion of this redistributed P is immobilized, lost, or recycled could be significant to forest nutrition and management. However, open questions exist regarding the quantity and fate of P deposited on skid trials. The aim of this study was to determine how much P is redistributed to skid trails and what happens to that P. We modeled the amount of P deposited on a skid trail during a whole-tree thinning of an Mill. stand, and quantified P stocks in the forest floor and mineral soil five years after the operation. An estimated 60% of harvested P from the encatchment was deposited on the skid trail. Five years after the harvest, forest floor P stocks in the skid trail dropped from an extrapolated 8.9 to 4.4 g m . The difference of 4.5 g m of P was not evident in mineral soil stocks, and loss through runoff or leaching would be minimal. With the greatest concentration of roots in the forest floor on the middle of the skid trail, mineralization and uptake of the missing P was the most likely explanation. This suggests that accumulated P on skid trails can be recycled through uptake by trees. Further testing in other stands and on which vegetation takes up accumulated P is still needed.
    Keywords: Nutrient Cycling ; Plant Uptake ; Whole-Tree Harvesting ; Brash Mats ; Allometric Modeling ; Forestry ; Biology
    ISSN: 0378-1127
    E-ISSN: 1872-7042
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: The Science of the Total Environment, Dec 1, 2015, Vol.535, p.54(7)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2014.10.108 Byline: Sondra Klitzke, George Metreveli, Andre Peters, Gabriele E. Schaumann, Friederike Lang Abstract: Nanoparticles enter soils through various pathways. In the soil, they undergo various interactions with the solution and the solid phase. We tested the following hypotheses using batch experiments: i) the colloidal stability of Ag NP increases through sorption of soil-borne dissolved organic matter (DOM) and thus inhibits aggregation; ii) the presence of DOM suppresses Ag oxidation; iii) the surface charge of Ag NP governs sorption onto soil particles. Citrate-stabilized and bare Ag NPs were equilibrated with (colloid-free) soil solution extracted from a floodplain soil for 24h. Nanoparticles were removed through centrifugation. Concentrations of free Ag ions and DOC, the specific UV absorbance at a wavelength of 254nm, and the absorption ratio [alpha].sub.254/[alpha].sub.410 were determined in the supernatant. Nanoparticle aggregation was studied using time-resolved dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement following the addition of soil solution and 1.5mM Ca.sup.2+ solution. To study the effect of surface charge on the adsorption of Ag NP onto soil particles, bare and citrate-stabilized Ag NP, differing in the zeta potential, were equilibrated with silt at a solid-to-solution ratio of 1:10 and an initial Ag concentration range of 30 to 320[mu]g/L. Results showed that bare Ag NPs sorb organic matter, with short-chained organic matter being preferentially adsorbed over long-chained, aromatic organic matter. Stabilizing effects of organic matter only come into play at higher Ag NP concentrations. Soil solution inhibits the release of Ag.sup.+ ions, presumably due to organic matter coatings. Sorption to silt particles was very similar for the two particle types, suggesting that the surface charge does not control Ag NP sorption. Besides, sorption was much lower than in comparable studies with sand and glass surfaces. Article History: Received 29 September 2014; Revised 30 October 2014; Accepted 30 October 2014 Article Note: (miscellaneous) Editor: D. Barcelo
    Keywords: Nanoparticles ; Adsorption
    ISSN: 0048-9697
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Plant and Soil, 2013, Vol.370(1), pp.497-509
    Description: Aims: We analysed current carbon (C) stocks in fine root and aboveground biomass of riparian forests and influential environmental parameters on either side of a dike in the Donau-Auen National Park, Austria. Methods: On both sides of the dike, carbon (C) stock of fine roots (CFR) under four dominant tree species and of aboveground biomass (CAB) were assessed by topsoil cores (0-30 cm) and angle count sampling method respectively (n=48). C stocks were modeled, performing boosted regression trees (BRT). Results: Overall CFR was 2.8 t ha super(-1), with significantly higher C stocks in diked (DRF) compared to flooded riparian forests (FRF). In contrast to CFR, mean CAB was 123 t ha super(-1) and lower in DRF compared to FRF. However, dike construction was consistently ruled out as a predictor variable in BRT. CFR was influenced by the distance to the Danube River and the dominant tree species. CAB was mainly influenced by the magnitude of fluctuations in the groundwater table and the distances to the river and the low groundwater table. Conclusions: Despite pronounced differences in FRF and DRF, we conclude that there is only weak support that dikes directly influence C allocation in floodplain forests within the time scale considered (110 years).
    Keywords: Aboveground biomass ; Belowground biomass ; Carbon distribution ; Carbon sequestration ; Dike ; Ecosystem services ; Floodplain forest
    ISSN: 0032-079X
    E-ISSN: 1573-5036
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Forest Ecology and Management, 01 December 2017, Vol.405, pp.200-209
    Description: Deadwood plays a crucial role in forest ecosystems, yet its impact on soil properties and specifically soil organic matter (SOM) stabilization is hitherto not fully understood or studied. We hypothesized that downed deadwood would enhance the light, labile SOM fraction in forest topsoils, and that those changes would be enhanced by advanced decay and higher rates of soil bioturbation that would move deadwood fragments into mineral soil. To test our hypotheses, we took topsoil samples directly next to European beech ( L.) downed deadwood and samples from paired reference points at eight stands in Southwest Germany. From those samples we separated SOM into three density fractions linked to physical and chemical SOM stabilization processes: the free light fraction, the aggregate-occluded light fraction and the mineral-adsorbed heavy fraction. On silicate bedrock, deadwood increased the free light fraction by 57% ( mg g ) compared to reference points. In contrast on calcareous bedrock, deadwood decreased the free light fraction by 23% ( mg g ) compared to reference points. Deadwood with advanced decay from all sites increased the aggregate-occluded light fraction by 40% ( mg g ) as well as total soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks by 24% ( mg cm ) as compared to reference points. In summary, the light fraction of SOM was affected by deadwood depending on site conditions and the more stable, aggregate-occluded fraction eventually increased near decayed deadwood through interactions between stimulated biological activity and both particulate and dissolved organic matter. Altogether these results indicate that deadwood increases SOC stocks at sites where SOM decomposition is slow enough to enable occlusion of particulate organic matter within aggregates.
    Keywords: Coarse Woody Debris ; Forest Management ; Som Stability ; Soil Aggregate ; Density Fractionation ; Forestry ; Biology
    ISSN: 0378-1127
    E-ISSN: 1872-7042
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: The Science of the Total Environment, Dec 1, 2015, Vol.535, p.1(2)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.06.006 Byline: Gabriele E. Schaumann, Thomas Baumann, Friederike Lang, George Metreveli, Hans-Jorg Vogel
    Keywords: Soils
    ISSN: 0048-9697
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems, 2012, Vol.93(1), pp.75-88
    Description: Topsoil constituents are eroded from agricultural sites and leached towards drainage channels. This transfer can affect aquatic ecosystems and deteriorate the efficiency of drainage systems and fertilisers. As long as erosion cannot be completely avoided, the recycling of sediments and associated nutrients may offer a sustainable solution to these problems. The aim of our case study at the island Sant Erasmo, lagoon of Venice (Italy) was to assess the ecological problems and potentials of sediment recycling. With our assessment we concentrated on (1) the origin of channel sediments, (2) the benefit of sediment application for increasing the nutrient stocks of the soils, and (3) the risk of heavy metal (HM) contamination of arable soils by sediment application. Samples from soils of horticultural sites, sediments, and waters from adjacent drainage channels and lagoon sediments were analyzed for the concentrations of nutrients (P and K) and HM (Cu, Pb, and Zn). Potentially available channel sediment masses and element stocks were calculated for the soil fertility classes of Sant Erasmo based on local measurements of sediment depths and analyses of aerial photographs by a geographic information system. In a column experiment, leaching of both nutrients and Cu from recently dredged sediments was analyzed. Heavy metal concentrations of soils and channel sediments were much higher than of lagoon sediments. The similarity of the chemical properties of the channel sediments and of top soil samples implies that topsoil material is eroded into the channels. The amount of sediments accumulated in the channels corresponded to soil erosion rates between 2 and 23 t ha −1  a −1 . Channel sediments contained higher concentrations of nutrients and organic carbon but slightly lower concentrations of HM than the soils of adjacent horticultural sites. Sediment P and K yields would be sufficient to replace fertiliser application at the horticultural sites for up to 51 and 35 years, respectively. The column experiment indicated that Cu mobilization induced by oxidation processes is restricted to the first years after sediments are applied to the soils. Our study emphasizes that for a comprehensive assessment of sediment recycling in agricultural systems the available sediment stocks as well as the contents of nutrients and pollutants of the sediment in relation to soils have to be considered.
    Keywords: Phosphorus ; Heavy metals ; Nutrient cycling ; Leaching experiment
    ISSN: 1385-1314
    E-ISSN: 1573-0867
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 2010, Vol.87(1), pp.11-20
    Description: Visual traces of iron reduction and oxidation are linked to the redox status of soils and have been used to characterise the quality of agricultural soils. We tested whether this feature could also be used to explain the spatial pattern of the natural vegetation of tidal habitats. If so, an easy assessment of the effect of rising sea level on tidal ecosystems would be possible. Our study was conducted at the salt marshes of the northern lagoon of Venice, which are strongly threatened by erosion and rising sea level and are part of the world heritage “Venice and its lagoon”. We analysed the abundance of plant species at 255 sampling points along a land–sea gradient. In addition, we surveyed the redox morphology (presence/absence of red iron oxide mottles in the greyish topsoil horizons) of the soils and the presence of disturbances. We used indicator species analysis, correlation trees and multivariate regression trees to analyse relations between soil properties and plant species distribution. Plant species with known sensitivity to anaerobic conditions (e.g. ) were identified as indicators for oxic soils (showing iron oxide mottles within a greyish soil matrix). Plant species that tolerate a low redox potential (e.g. ) were identified as indicators for anoxic soils (greyish matrix without oxide mottles). Correlation trees and multivariate regression trees indicate the dominant role of the redox morphology of the soils in plant species distribution. In addition, the distance from the mainland and the presence of disturbances were identified as tree-splitting variables. The small-scale variation of oxygen availability plays a key role for the biodiversity of salt marsh ecosystems. Our results suggest that the redox morphology of salt marsh soils indicates the plant availability of oxygen. Thus, the consideration of this indicator may enable an understanding of the heterogeneity of biological processes in oxygen-limited systems and may be a sensitive and easy-to-use tool to assess human impacts on salt marsh ecosystems.
    Keywords: Coastal Wetlands ; Iron Oxides ; Halophyte Ecology ; Regression Trees ; Indicator Species Analysis ; Classification of Marsh Soils ; Biology ; Oceanography
    ISSN: 0272-7714
    E-ISSN: 1096-0015
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Soils and Sediments, 2013, Vol.13(3), pp.606-615
    Description: Byline: Horst Schonsky (1), Andre Peters (1), Friederike Lang (2), Stefan Abel (1), Beate Mekiffer (3), Gerd Wessolek (1) Keywords: Column experiment; Construction rubble; Numerical modeling; Sulfate; Urban soil Abstract: Purpose In Berlin and many other cities, technogenic soil substrates from World War II and building and construction debris, in general, play an important role for soil formation and solute transport in the vadose zone. The largest debris landfill in Berlin is the Teufelsberg. Sulfate release from the landfill poses threats to groundwater quality. The scope of this study is to determine and model the processes controlling sulfate release from soils containing construction rubble. Materials and methods Column leaching experiments were conducted to analyze sulfate mobilization from Teufelsberg topsoil material. Flow interruptions of 1 and 7 days were applied. Sulfate release was modeled using a geochemical simulation tool (HP1). The model considered water flux, solute transport, and precipitation/dissolution with first-order kinetics. Results and discussion Sulfate release increased after flow interruptions, although bromide breakthrough indicated physical equilibrium of transport processes. Hence, kinetically limited solution/dissolution of sulfate is assumed. The model was applicable for qualitative description of our experimental results. The estimated equilibrium concentrations of sulfate were one to two orders of magnitude smaller than expected according to the equilibrium constant of gypsum. Conclusions It is assumed that the mobilization and transport of sulfate from debris soil material can be described by an effective model. If sulfate release and transport from soils containing debris is modeled using literature values of thermodynamic constants for gypsum, sulfate concentrations will be overestimated by one to two orders of magnitude. Author Affiliation: (1) Fachgebiet Standortkunde und Bodenschutz, Technische Universitat Berlin, Ernst Reuter Platz 1, 10587, Berlin, Germany (2) Institut fur Bodenkunde und Waldernahrungslehre, Albert Ludwig Universitat Freiburg, Bertoldstr. 17, 79085, Freiburg i.Br., Germany (3) WISTA-MANAGEMENT GMBH, Rudower Chaussee 17, 12489, Berlin, Germany Article History: Registration Date: 01/10/2012 Received Date: 12/12/2011 Accepted Date: 01/10/2012 Online Date: 19/10/2012 Article note: Responsible editor: Jean Louis Morel
    Keywords: Column experiment ; Construction rubble ; Numerical modeling ; Sulfate ; Urban soil
    ISSN: 1439-0108
    E-ISSN: 1614-7480
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