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  • Oxford University Press (CrossRef)  (5)
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, 07/12/2018, Vol.24(8), pp.1768-1779
    Description: Abstract Background andAims Vitamin and iron deficiencies are common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) as a result of chronic intestinal inflammation, increase in demand, or dietary restrictions. Here, we assessed the frequency of complications in relation to deficiency of iron, folate acid, and vitamin B12 in patients enrolled in the nationwide Swiss Inflammatory Bowel Disease Cohort Study (SIBDCS). Methods A total of 2666 patients were included in the study, 1558 with Crohn's disease (CD) and 1108 with ulcerative colitis (UC). Results Iron deficiency anemia was detected in 19.6% of CD patients and 21.6% of UC patients. In CD patients low BMI and nonsmoker status were positively associated with anemia. In both CD and UC, malabsorption syndrome, defined as failure of the GI tract to absorb 1 or more substances from the diet, was found to be significantly associated with anemia (6.2% and 3.8%, respectively) and current steroid use (40% CD, 52.7% UC). In CD patients with ileal (31.7% vs 20%) and colonic (29.9% vs 25%) disease location folate deficiency was significantly higher than in patients with ileocolonic CD or upper GI involvement. In CD patients, vitamin B12 deficiency was associated with the onset of stenosis and intestinal surgery (42.9% vs 32.8% and 46% vs 33% for patients with versus without B12 deficiency). Conclusion Our data indicate that due to frequent occurrence of deficiency states, regular monitoring and substitution of vitamins and iron are mandatory and may prevent long-term intestinal and extraintestinal complications in IBD patients.
    Keywords: Medicine;
    ISSN: 1078-0998
    E-ISSN: 1536-4844
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Crohn's and Colitis, 06/28/2018, Vol.12(7), pp.811-818
    Description: Abstract Objectives Previous population-based studies in patients with ulcerative colitis [UC] revealed variable colectomy rates and colectomy-associated risk factors. Over the past two decades, a decrease in colectomy rates was observed. We assessed risk factors and colectomy rates over time in UC in the Swiss Inflammatory Bowel Disease Cohort Study [SIBDCS]. Methods Prospectively collected SIBDCS data, including disease history, baseline characteristics at enrolment, and course of disease, were retrospectively analysed. Cumulative and adjusted annual colectomy rates were calculated. Results Among 1245 UC patients analysed [54.6% male], 114 [9.2%] underwent colectomy. We observed 5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-year cumulative colectomy rates after diagnosis of 4.1%, 6.4%, 10.4%, and 14.4% of patients, respectively. Male sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.54; p = 0.035), pancolitis at diagnosis [OR = 2.16; p = 0.005], younger age at diagnosis [OR 0.89 per 5 years of age; p = 0.006] and presence of extraintestinal manifestations [EIM] [OR 2.30; p 〈 0.001] were risk factors for undergoing colectomy. We did not observe a significant protective effect of smoking on colectomy risk [OR 0.64; p = 0.106]. The majority of colectomies were performed within first 10 years of disease onset, with a rapidly decreasing colectomy rate after 15 years. In patients diagnosed after 2003, colectomy was performed much earlier during and individual’s disease course. Nevertheless, we found a significantly decreasing trend in yearly colectomy rates over time after 2005. Conclusions Crude and adjusted colectomy rates in Swiss UC patients were lower than those reported previously in the literature, and decreased over time.
    Keywords: Medicine;
    ISSN: 1873-9946
    E-ISSN: 1876-4479
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  • 3
    In: European Heart Journal, 2014, Vol. 35(29), pp.1932-1948
    Description: AimTo investigate the putative modifying effect of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) use on the incidence of stent thrombosis at 3 years in patients randomized to Endeavor zotarolimus-eluting stent (E-ZES) or Cypher sirolimus-eluting stent (C-SES).Methods and resultsOf 8709 patients in PROTECT, 4357 were randomized to E-ZES and 4352 to C-SES. Aspirin was to be given indefinitely, and clopidogrel/ticlopidine for greater than or equal to 3 months or up to 12 months after implantation. Main outcome measures were definite or probable stent thrombosis at 3 years. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was applied, with stent type, DAPT, and their interaction as the main outcome determinants. Dual antiplatelet therapy adherence remained the same in the E-ZES and C-SES groups (79.6% at 1 year, 32.8% at 2 years, and 21.6% at 3 years). We observed a statistically significant (P = 0.0052) heterogeneity in treatment effect of stent type in relation to DAPT. In the absence of DAPT, stent thrombosis was lower with E-ZES vs. C-SES (adjusted hazard ratio 0.38, 95% confidence interval 0.19, 0.75; P = 0.0056). In the presence of DAPT, no difference was found (1.18; 0.79, 1.77; P = 0.43).ConclusionA strong interaction was observed between drug-eluting stent type and DAPT use, most likely prompted by the vascular healing response induced by the implanted DES system. These results suggest that the incidence of stent thrombosis in DES trials should not be evaluated independently of DAPT use, and the optimal duration of DAPT will likely depend upon stent type (Clinicaltrials.gov number NCT00476957).
    Keywords: Drug - Eluting Stent ; Dual Antiplatelet Therapy ; Stent Thrombosis ; Endothelialization ; Healing ; Sirolimus ; Zotarolimus
    ISSN: 0195-668X
    E-ISSN: 1522-9645
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: International Journal of Epidemiology, 04/01/2019, Vol.48(2), pp.385-386f
    Keywords: Medicine ; Public Health;
    ISSN: 0300-5771
    E-ISSN: 1464-3685
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Crohn's and Colitis, 05/27/2019, Vol.13(6), pp.744-754
    Description: Inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] places an economic strain on health systems due to expensive pharmaceutical therapy, risk of hospitalisation and surgery, and long-term monitoring. The evolving treatment guidelines advocate rapid scale-up to biologic agents in order to improve health outcomes and quality of life. This study evaluated changes in health care utilisation and expenditures for IBD in Switzerland over time. We extracted clinical, patient, and resource consumption data from the Swiss IBD Cohort Study between 2006 and 2016. Average unit costs for IBD-related events were derived from Swiss claims data and pharmaceutical price lists. We used multivariate regression, controlling for patient-level characteristics, to estimate trends and determinants of direct and indirect costs and resource utilisation. We included 2365 adults diagnosed with Crohn's disease [CD; N = 1353] and ulcerative colitis [UC; N = 1012]. From 2006-16, mean health care expenditures per patient per year were 9504 euros [70% drugs, 23% inpatient, 7% outpatient] for CD and 5704 euros [68% drugs, 22% inpatient, 10% outpatient] for UC. Health care costs increased by 7% [CD] and 10% [UC] per year, largely due to rising pharmaceutical expenditures driven by increased biologic agent use. Inpatient, outpatient, and indirect costs fluctuated and did not offset increased pharmaceutical costs. Disease characteristics were important predictors of costs. Increased expenditure for IBD was marked by a shift towards greater pharmaceutical management over the past decade. This study highlights the need to identify cost-effective treatment strategies in the face of increased uptake and expenditures associated with innovative treatments.
    Keywords: Crohn’s Disease ; Ibd ; Health Economics ; Ulcerative Colitis;
    ISSN: 1873-9946
    E-ISSN: 1876-4479
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