Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • Article  (23)
  • PMC (PubMed Central)  (23)
  • OneFile (GALE)  (23)
Type of Medium
  • Article  (23)
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Nature, November 2018, Vol.563(7729), pp.121-125
    Description: Many evolutionarily distant pathogenic organisms have evolved similar survival strategies to evade the immune responses of their hosts. These include antigenic variation, through which an infecting organism prevents clearance by periodically altering the identity of proteins that are visible to the immune system of the host. Antigenic variation requires large reservoirs of immunologically diverse antigen genes, which are often generated through homologous recombination, as well as mechanisms to ensure the expression of one or very few antigens at any given time. Both homologous recombination and gene expression are affected by three-dimensional genome architecture and local DNA accessibility. Factors that link three-dimensional genome architecture, local chromatin conformation and antigenic variation have, to our knowledge, not yet been identified in any organism. One of the major obstacles to studying the role of genome architecture in antigenic variation has been the highly repetitive nature and heterozygosity of antigen-gene arrays, which has precluded complete genome assembly in many pathogens. Here we report the de novo haplotype-specific assembly and scaffolding of the long antigen-gene arrays of the model protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, using long-read sequencing technology and conserved features of chromosome folding. Genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) reveals a distinct partitioning of the genome, with antigen-encoding subtelomeric regions that are folded into distinct, highly compact compartments. In addition, we performed a range of analyses-Hi-C, fluorescence in situ hybridization, assays for transposase-accessible chromatin using sequencing and single-cell RNA sequencing-that showed that deletion of the histone variants H3.V and H4.V increases antigen-gene clustering, DNA accessibility across sites of antigen expression and switching of the expressed antigen isoform, via homologous recombination. Our analyses identify histone variants as a molecular link between global genome architecture, local chromatin conformation and antigenic variation.
    Keywords: Antigenic Variation -- Genetics ; Chromatin -- Genetics ; DNA, Protozoan -- Metabolism ; Genome -- Genetics ; Trypanosoma Brucei Brucei -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00280836
    E-ISSN: 1476-4687
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    In: Nature, 2011, Vol.471(7340), p.602
    Description: CRISPR/Cas systems constitute a widespread class of immunity systems that protect bacteria and archaea against phages and plasmids, and commonly use repeat/spacer-derived short crRNAs to silence foreign nucleic acids in a sequence-specific manner. Although the maturation of crRNAs represents a key event in CRISPR activation, the responsible endoribonucleases (CasE, Cas6, Csy4) are missing in many CRISPR/Cas subtypes. Here, differential RNA sequencing of the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes uncovered tracrRNA, a trans -encoded small RNA with 24 nucleotide complementarity to the repeat regions of crRNA precursor transcripts. We show that tracrRNA directs the maturation of crRNAs by the activities of the widely conserved endogenous RNase III and the CRISPR-associated Csn1 protein; all these components are essential to protect S. pyogenes against prophage-derived DNA. Our study reveals a novel pathway of small guide RNA maturation and the first example of a host factor (RNase III) required for bacterial RNA-mediated immunity against invaders.
    Keywords: Article;
    ISSN: 0028-0836
    E-ISSN: 14764687
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 2011, Vol.6(3), p.e17296
    Description: P-bodies are dynamic aggregates of RNA and proteins involved in several post-transcriptional regulation processes. P-bodies have been shown to play important roles in regulating viral infection, whereas their interplay with bacterial pathogens, specifically intracellular bacteria that extensively manipulate host cell pathways, remains unknown. Here, we report that Salmonella infection induces P-body disassembly in a cell type-specific manner, and independently of previously characterized pathways such as inhibition of host cell RNA synthesis or microRNA-mediated gene silencing. We show that the Salmonella -induced P-body disassembly depends on the activation of the SPI-2 encoded type 3 secretion system, and that the secreted effector protein SpvB plays a major role in this process. P-body disruption is also induced by the related pathogen, Shigella flexneri , arguing that this might be a new mechanism by which intracellular bacterial pathogens subvert host cell function.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology ; Medicine ; Infectious Diseases ; Microbiology ; Molecular Biology ; Cell Biology
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: PloS one, 2016, Vol.11(7), pp.e0159948
    Description: Matter turnover in soil is tightly linked to soil structure which governs the heterogeneous distribution of habitats, reaction sites and pathways in soil. Thereby, the temporal dynamics of soil structure alteration is deemed to be important for essential ecosystem functions of soil but very little is known about it. A major reason for this knowledge gap is the lack of methods to study soil structure turnover directly at microscopic scales. Here we devise a conceptual approach and an image processing workflow to study soil structure turnover by labeling some initial state of soil structure with small garnet particles and tracking their fate with X-ray microtomography. The particles adhere to aggregate boundaries at the beginning of the experiment but gradually change their position relative to the nearest pore as structure formation progresses and pores are destructed or newly formed. A new metric based on the contact distances between particles and pores is proposed that allows for a direct quantification of soil structure turnover rates. The methodology is tested for a case study about soil compaction of a silty loam soil during stepwise increase of bulk density (ρ = {1.1, 1.3, 1.5} g/cm3). We demonstrate that the analysis of mean contact distances provides genuinely new insights about changing diffusion pathways that cannot be inferred neither from conventional pore space attributes (porosity, mean pore size, pore connectivity) nor from deformation analysis with digital image correlation. This structure labeling approach to quantify soil structure turnover provides a direct analogy to stable isotope labeling for the analysis of matter turnover and can be readily combined with each other.
    Keywords: X-Ray Microtomography ; Soil -- Chemistry
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    In: PLoS Pathogens, 2017, Vol.13(2)
    Description: The transcriptome is a powerful proxy for the physiological state of a cell, healthy or diseased. As a result, transcriptome analysis has become a key tool in understanding the molecular changes that accompany bacterial infections of eukaryotic cells. Until recently, such transcriptomic studies have been technically limited to analyzing mRNA expression changes in either the bacterial pathogen or the infected eukaryotic host cell. However, the increasing sensitivity of high-throughput RNA sequencing now enables “dual RNA-seq” studies, simultaneously capturing all classes of coding and noncoding transcripts in both the pathogen and the host. In the five years since the concept of dual RNA-seq was introduced, the technique has been applied to a range of infection models. This has not only led to a better understanding of the physiological changes in pathogen and host during the course of an infection but has also revealed hidden molecular phenotypes of virulence-associated small noncoding RNAs that were not visible in standard infection assays. Here, we use the knowledge gained from these recent studies to suggest experimental and computational guidelines for the design of future dual RNA-seq studies. We conclude this review by discussing prospective applications of the technique.
    Keywords: Review ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Research And Analysis Methods ; Medicine And Health Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Medicine And Health Sciences ; Medicine And Health Sciences ; Medicine And Health Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Medicine And Health Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Research And Analysis Methods
    ISSN: 1553-7366
    E-ISSN: 1553-7374
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    In: PLoS Genetics, 2016, Vol.12(4)
    Description: While an increasing number of conserved small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are known to function in general bacterial physiology, the roles and modes of action of sRNAs from horizontally acquired genomic regions remain little understood. The IsrK sRNA of Gifsy-1 prophage of Salmonella belongs to the latter class. This regulatory RNA exists in two isoforms. The first forms, when a portion of transcripts originating from isrK promoter reads-through the IsrK transcription-terminator producing a translationally inactive mRNA target. Acting in trans , the second isoform, short IsrK RNA, binds the inactive transcript rendering it translationally active. By switching on translation of the first isoform, short IsrK indirectly activates the production of AntQ, an antiterminator protein located upstream of isrK . Expression of antQ globally interferes with transcription termination resulting in bacterial growth arrest and ultimately cell death. Escherichia coli and Salmonella cells expressing AntQ display condensed chromatin morphology and localization of UvrD to the nucleoid. The toxic phenotype of AntQ can be rescued by co-expression of the transcription termination factor, Rho, or RNase H, which protects genomic DNA from breaks by resolving R-loops. We propose that AntQ causes conflicts between transcription and replication machineries and thus promotes DNA damage. The isrK locus represents a unique example of an island-encoded sRNA that exerts a highly complex regulatory mechanism to tune the expression of a toxic protein. Author Summary As the function of conserved core-genome-encoded small RNAs (sRNA) reflects the basic lifestyle of bacteria, the function of non-conserved island-encoded sRNAs remains enigmatic. The island-encoded sRNA IsrK belongs to Gifsy-1 prophage of Salmonella . Here, we report a complex mechanism in which the IsrK RNA functions as both sRNA and mRNA to control the production of the toxic AntQ protein. The isrK promoter directs the synthesis of two distinct RNA species: a full-length translationally inactive target mRNA and the correctly terminated, shorter IsrK sRNA. IsrK sRNA binds the full-length inactive mRNA producing an antiterminator protein, AntQ, which interferes with transcription termination. Expression of antQ results in bacterial growth arrest and ultimately cell death. Fluorescence microscopy of E . coli and Salmonella expressing antQ revealed condensed chromatin morphology as observed upon exposure to DNA-damaging agents. We propose that expression of the phage antiterminator protein results in conflicts between transcription and replication machineries and thus facilitates DNA damage. In summary, the RNA regulator IsrK presents a new regulatory principle in which a horizontally acquired sRNA controls genome integrity.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Medicine And Health Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Medicine And Health Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Research And Analysis Methods ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Research And Analysis Methods ; Research And Analysis Methods ; Biology And Life Sciences
    ISSN: 1553-7390
    E-ISSN: 1553-7404
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    In: PLoS Genetics, 2017, Vol.13(2)
    Description: The carbon storage regulator protein CsrA regulates cellular processes post-transcriptionally by binding to target-RNAs altering translation efficiency and/or their stability. Here we identified and analyzed the direct targets of CsrA in the human pathogen Legionella pneumophila . Genome wide transcriptome, proteome and RNA co-immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing of a wild type and a csrA mutant strain identified 479 RNAs with potential CsrA interaction sites located in the untranslated and/or coding regions of mRNAs or of known non-coding sRNAs. Further analyses revealed that CsrA exhibits a dual regulatory role in virulence as it affects the expression of the regulators FleQ, LqsR, LetE and RpoS but it also directly regulates the timely expression of over 40 Dot/Icm substrates. CsrA controls its own expression and the stringent response through a regulatory feedback loop as evidenced by its binding to RelA-mRNA and links it to quorum sensing and motility. CsrA is a central player in the carbon, amino acid, fatty acid metabolism and energy transfer and directly affects the biosynthesis of cofactors, vitamins and secondary metabolites. We describe the first L . pneumophila riboswitch, a thiamine pyrophosphate riboswitch whose regulatory impact is fine-tuned by CsrA, and identified a unique regulatory mode of CsrA, the active stabilization of RNA anti-terminator conformations inside a coding sequence preventing Rho-dependent termination of the gap operon through transcriptional polarity effects. This allows L . pneumophila to regulate the pentose phosphate pathway and the glycolysis combined or individually although they share genes in a single operon. Thus the L . pneumophila genome has evolved to acclimate at least five different modes of regulation by CsrA giving it a truly unique position in its life cycle. Author summary The RNA binding protein CsrA is the master regulator of the bi-phasic life cycle of Legionella pneumophila governing virulence expression in this intracellular pathogen. Here, we have used deep sequencing of RNA enriched by co-immunoprecipitation with epitope-tagged CsrA to identify CsrA-associated transcripts at the genome level. We found 479 mRNAs or non-coding RNAs to be targets of CsrA. Among those major regulators including FleQ, the regulator of flagella expression, LqsR, the regulator of quorum sensing and RpoS implicated in stress response were identified. The expression of over 40 type IV secreted effector proteins important for intracellular survival and virulence are under the control of CsrA. Combined with transcriptomics, whole shotgun proteomics of a wild type and a CsrA mutant strain and functional analyses of several CsrA-targeted RNAs we identified the first riboswitch in L . pneumophila , a thiamine pyrophosphate riboswitch, and discovered a new mode of regulation by CsrA that allows L . pneumophila to regulate the pentose phosphate pathway and the glycolysis combined or individually although they share genes in a single operon. Our results further underline the indispensable role of CsrA in the life cycle of L . pneumophila and provide new insights into its regulatory roles and mechanisms.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Medicine And Health Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Research And Analysis Methods ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Biology And Life Sciences
    ISSN: 1553-7390
    E-ISSN: 1553-7404
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: PLoS Pathogens, 2016, Vol. 12(6)
    Description: Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Tm) is a common cause of self-limiting diarrhea. The mucosal inflammation is thought to arise from a standoff between the pathogen's virulence factors and the host's mucosal innate immune defenses, particularly the mucosal NAIP/NLRC4 inflammasome. However, it had remained unclear how this switches the gut from homeostasis to inflammation. This was studied using the streptomycin mouse model. S. Tm infections in knockout mice, cytokine inhibition and -injection experiments revealed that caspase-1 (not -11) dependent IL-18 is pivotal for inducing acute inflammation. IL-18 boosted NK cell chemoattractants and enhanced the NK cells' migratory capacity, thus promoting mucosal accumulation of mature, activated NK cells. NK cell depletion and Prf(-/-) ablation (but not granulocyte-depletion or T-cell deficiency) delayed tissue inflammation. Our data suggest an NK cell perforin response as one limiting factor in mounting gut mucosal inflammation. Thus, IL-18-elicited NK cell perforin responses seem to be critical for coordinating mucosal inflammation during early infection, when S. Tm strongly relies on virulence factors detectable by the inflammasome. This may have broad relevance for mucosal defense against microbial pathogens.
    Keywords: Medical And Health Sciences ; Clinical Medicine ; Infectious Medicine ; Medicin Och Hälsovetenskap ; Klinisk Medicin ; Infektionsmedicin ; Medical And Health Sciences ; Basic Medicine ; Microbiology In The Medical Area ; Medicin Och Hälsovetenskap ; Medicinska Och Farmaceutiska Grundvetenskaper ; Mikrobiologi Inom Det Medicinska Området
    ISSN: 1553-7366
    E-ISSN: 15537374
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: PLoS Biology, 2008, Vol.6(3), p.e64
    Description: Small noncoding RNAs (sRNA) can function as posttranscriptional activators of gene expression to regulate stress responses and metabolism. We here describe the mechanisms by which two sRNAs, GlmY and GlmZ, activate the Escherichia coli glmS mRNA, coding for an essential enzyme in amino-sugar metabolism. The two sRNAs, although being highly similar in sequence and structure, act in a hierarchical manner. GlmZ, together with the RNA chaperone, Hfq, directly activates glmS mRNA translation by an anti-antisense mechanism. In contrast, GlmY acts upstream of GlmZ and positively regulates glmS by antagonizing GlmZ RNA inactivation. We also report the first example, to our knowledge, of mRNA expression being controlled by the poly(A) status of a chromosomally encoded sRNA. We show that in wild-type cells, GlmY RNA is unstable due to 3′ end polyadenylation; whereas in an E. coli pcnB mutant defective in RNA polyadenylation, GlmY is stabilized and accumulates, which in turn stabilizes GlmZ and causes GlmS overproduction. Our study reveals hierarchical action of two well-conserved sRNAs in a complex regulatory cascade that controls the glmS mRNA. Similar cascades of noncoding RNA regulators may operate in other organisms. ; Hierarchical action of regulators is a fundamental principle in gene expression control, and is well understood in protein-based signaling pathways. We have discovered that small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs), a new class of gene expression regulators, can also act hierarchically and form a regulatory cascade. Two highly similar sRNAs function after transcription to activate the mRNA, which codes for an essential function in amino-sugar metabolism. It is somewhat unusual for two sRNAs to act upon the same target mRNA, and despite their seeming homology, these two sRNAs (GlmY and GlmZ) employ different molecular mechanisms and function hierarchically to activate expression: GlmZ directly activates translation via disruption of an mRNA structure that inhibits translation, whereas GlmY controls the processing of GlmZ to prevent the inactivation of this direct activator. We also found that GlmY is itself controlled by an RNA processing event (3′ end polyadenylation), which typically destabilizes bacterial RNA. Our data unequivocally demonstrate that is exceptionally dependent on RNA-based mechanisms for its genetic control. Given the large number of noncoding RNAs of unknown function, we believe that similar regulatory RNA cascades may operate in other organisms. ; A regulatory RNA cascade that posttranscriptionally activates the mRNA is identified, with two highly similar small noncoding RNAs acting hierarchically in a manner thus far known only in protein-based regulatory circuits.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biochemistry ; Genetics And Genomics ; Molecular Biology
    ISSN: 1544-9173
    E-ISSN: 1545-7885
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Frontiers in microbiology, 2018, Vol.9, pp.1929
    Description: Over the last 60 years, soil microbiologists have accumulated a wealth of experimental data showing that the bulk, macroscopic parameters (e.g., granulometry, pH, soil organic matter, and biomass contents) commonly used to characterize soils provide insufficient information to describe quantitatively the activity of soil microorganisms and some of its outcomes, like the emission of greenhouse gasses. Clearly, new, more appropriate macroscopic parameters are needed, which reflect better the spatial heterogeneity of soils at the microscale (i.e., the pore scale) that is commensurate with the habitat of many microorganisms. For a long time, spectroscopic and microscopic tools were lacking to quantify processes at that scale, but major technological advances over the last 15 years have made suitable equipment available to researchers. In this context, the objective of the present article is to review progress achieved to date in the significant research program that has ensued. This program can be rationalized as a sequence of steps, namely the quantification and modeling of the physical-, (bio)chemical-, and microbiological properties of soils, the integration of these different perspectives into a unified theory, its upscaling to the macroscopic scale, and, eventually, the development of new approaches to measure macroscopic soil characteristics. At this stage, significant progress has been achieved on the physical front, and to a lesser extent on the (bio)chemical one as well, both in terms of experiments and modeling. With regard to the microbial aspects, although a lot of work has been devoted to the modeling of bacterial and fungal activity in soils at the pore scale, the appropriateness of model assumptions cannot be readily assessed because of the scarcity of relevant experimental data. For significant progress to be made, it is crucial to make sure that research on the microbial components of soil systems does not keep lagging behind the work on the physical and (bio)chemical characteristics. Concerning the subsequent steps in the program, very little integration of the various disciplinary perspectives has occurred so far, and, as a result, researchers have not yet been able to tackle the scaling up to the macroscopic level. Many challenges, some of them daunting, remain on the path ahead. Fortunately, a number of these challenges may be resolved by brand new measuring equipment that will become commercially available in the very near future.
    Keywords: Nanosims Imaging ; X-Ray Computed ; Biodiversity ; Single-Cell Genomics ; Soil Microbiology ; Tomography ; Upscaling
    ISSN: 1664-302X
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages