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  • PMC (PubMed Central)  (61)
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Nucleic acids research, October 2010, Vol.38(19), pp.6637-51
    Description: Post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are widespread in bacteria. Interestingly, current published data hint that some of these mechanisms may be non-random with respect to their phylogenetic distribution. Although small, trans-acting regulatory RNAs commonly occur in bacterial genomes, they have been better characterized in Gram-negative bacteria, leaving the impression that they may be less important for Firmicutes. It has been presumed that Gram-positive bacteria, in particular the Firmicutes, are likely to utilize cis-acting regulatory RNAs located within the 5' mRNA leader region more often than trans-acting regulatory RNAs. In this analysis we catalog, by a deep sequencing-based approach, both classes of regulatory RNA candidates for Bacillus subtilis, the model microorganism for Firmicutes. We successfully recover most of the known small RNA regulators while also identifying a greater number of new candidate RNAs. We anticipate these data to be a broadly useful resource for analysis of post-transcriptional regulatory strategies in B. subtilis and other Firmicutes.
    Keywords: Bacillus Subtilis -- Genetics ; RNA, Small Untranslated -- Analysis
    ISSN: 03051048
    E-ISSN: 1362-4962
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  • 2
    In: Nature, 2011, Vol.471(7340), p.602
    Description: CRISPR/Cas systems constitute a widespread class of immunity systems that protect bacteria and archaea against phages and plasmids, and commonly use repeat/spacer-derived short crRNAs to silence foreign nucleic acids in a sequence-specific manner. Although the maturation of crRNAs represents a key event in CRISPR activation, the responsible endoribonucleases (CasE, Cas6, Csy4) are missing in many CRISPR/Cas subtypes. Here, differential RNA sequencing of the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes uncovered tracrRNA, a trans-encoded small RNA with 24-nucleotide complementarity to the repeat regions of crRNA precursor transcripts. We show that tracrRNA directs the maturation of crRNAs by the activities of the widely conserved endogenous RNase III and the CRISPR-associated Csn1 protein; all these components are essential to protect S. pyogenes against prophage-derived DNA. Our study reveals a novel pathway of small guide RNA maturation and the first example of a host factor (RNase III) required for bacterial RNA-mediated immunity against invaders. [PUBLICATION ]
    Keywords: Bacterial Proteins–Chemistry ; Bacterial Proteins–Genetics ; Bacterial Proteins–Immunology ; Bacterial Proteins–Metabolism ; Conserved Sequence–Genetics ; DNA, Viral–Metabolism ; DNA, Viral–Genetics ; Escherichia Coli–Genetics ; Models, Biological–Metabolism ; Prophages–Biosynthesis ; RNA Precursors–Genetics ; RNA Precursors–Immunology ; RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional–Metabolism ; RNA, Bacterial–Genetics ; RNA, Bacterial–Metabolism ; RNA, Bacterial–Genetics ; RNA, Bacterial–Immunology ; RNA, Guide–Metabolism ; Ribonuclease III–Virology ; Streptococcus Pyogenes–Virology ; Streptococcus Pyogenes–Virology ; Streptococcus Pyogenes–Virology ; Streptococcus Pyogenes–Virology ; E Coli ; Bacteria ; Bacteriology ; Plasmids ; Proteins ; Bacterial Proteins ; DNA, Viral ; RNA Precursors ; RNA, Bacterial ; RNA, Guide ; Ribonuclease III;
    ISSN: 0028-0836
    E-ISSN: 14764687
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 2011, Vol.6(3), p.e17296
    Description: P-bodies are dynamic aggregates of RNA and proteins involved in several post-transcriptional regulation processes. P-bodies have been shown to play important roles in regulating viral infection, whereas their interplay with bacterial pathogens, specifically intracellular bacteria that extensively manipulate host cell pathways, remains unknown. Here, we report that Salmonella infection induces P-body disassembly in a cell type-specific manner, and independently of previously characterized pathways such as inhibition of host cell RNA synthesis or microRNA-mediated gene silencing. We show that the Salmonella -induced P-body disassembly depends on the activation of the SPI-2 encoded type 3 secretion system, and that the secreted effector protein SpvB plays a major role in this process. P-body disruption is also induced by the related pathogen, Shigella flexneri , arguing that this might be a new mechanism by which intracellular bacterial pathogens subvert host cell function.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology ; Medicine ; Infectious Diseases ; Microbiology ; Molecular Biology ; Cell Biology
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: PloS one, 2016, Vol.11(7), pp.e0159948
    Description: Matter turnover in soil is tightly linked to soil structure which governs the heterogeneous distribution of habitats, reaction sites and pathways in soil. Thereby, the temporal dynamics of soil structure alteration is deemed to be important for essential ecosystem functions of soil but very little is known about it. A major reason for this knowledge gap is the lack of methods to study soil structure turnover directly at microscopic scales. Here we devise a conceptual approach and an image processing workflow to study soil structure turnover by labeling some initial state of soil structure with small garnet particles and tracking their fate with X-ray microtomography. The particles adhere to aggregate boundaries at the beginning of the experiment but gradually change their position relative to the nearest pore as structure formation progresses and pores are destructed or newly formed. A new metric based on the contact distances between particles and pores is proposed that allows for a direct quantification of soil structure turnover rates. The methodology is tested for a case study about soil compaction of a silty loam soil during stepwise increase of bulk density (ρ = {1.1, 1.3, 1.5} g/cm3). We demonstrate that the analysis of mean contact distances provides genuinely new insights about changing diffusion pathways that cannot be inferred neither from conventional pore space attributes (porosity, mean pore size, pore connectivity) nor from deformation analysis with digital image correlation. This structure labeling approach to quantify soil structure turnover provides a direct analogy to stable isotope labeling for the analysis of matter turnover and can be readily combined with each other.
    Keywords: X-Ray Microtomography ; Soil -- Chemistry
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Nucleic acids research, 02 June 2017, Vol.45(10), pp.6147-6167
    Description: Neisseria meningitidis is a human commensal that can also cause life-threatening meningitis and septicemia. Despite growing evidence for RNA-based regulation in meningococci, their transcriptome structure and output of regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) are incompletely understood. Using dRNA-seq, we have mapped at single-nucleotide resolution the primary transcriptome of N. meningitidis strain 8013. Annotation of 1625 transcriptional start sites defines transcription units for most protein-coding genes but also reveals a paucity of classical σ70-type promoters, suggesting the existence of activators that compensate for the lack of -35 consensus sequences in N. meningitidis. The transcriptome maps also reveal 65 candidate sRNAs, a third of which were validated by northern blot analysis. Immunoprecipitation with the RNA chaperone Hfq drafts an unexpectedly large post-transcriptional regulatory network in this organism, comprising 23 sRNAs and hundreds of potential mRNA targets. Based on this data, using a newly developed gfp reporter system we validate an Hfq-dependent mRNA repression of the putative colonization factor PrpB by the two trans-acting sRNAs RcoF1/2. Our genome-wide RNA compendium will allow for a better understanding of meningococcal transcriptome organization and riboregulation with implications for colonization of the human nasopharynx.
    Keywords: Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial ; Transcriptome ; Bacterial Proteins -- Metabolism ; Host Factor 1 Protein -- Metabolism ; Micrornas -- Genetics ; Molecular Chaperones -- Metabolism ; Neisseria Meningitidis -- Genetics ; RNA, Bacterial -- Genetics ; RNA, Messenger -- Genetics
    ISSN: 03051048
    E-ISSN: 1362-4962
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Nucleic acids research, 20 June 2017, Vol.45(11), pp.e96
    Description: RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have been established as core components of several post-transcriptional gene regulation mechanisms. Experimental techniques such as cross-linking and co-immunoprecipitation have enabled the identification of RBPs, RNA-binding domains (RBDs) and their regulatory roles in the eukaryotic species such as human and yeast in large-scale. In contrast, our knowledge of the number and potential diversity of RBPs in bacteria is poorer due to the technical challenges associated with the existing global screening approaches. We introduce APRICOT, a computational pipeline for the sequence-based identification and characterization of proteins using RBDs known from experimental studies. The pipeline identifies functional motifs in protein sequences using position-specific scoring matrices and Hidden Markov Models of the functional domains and statistically scores them based on a series of sequence-based features. Subsequently, APRICOT identifies putative RBPs and characterizes them by several biological properties. Here we demonstrate the application and adaptability of the pipeline on large-scale protein sets, including the bacterial proteome of Escherichia coli. APRICOT showed better performance on various datasets compared to other existing tools for the sequence-based prediction of RBPs by achieving an average sensitivity and specificity of 0.90 and 0.91 respectively. The command-line tool and its documentation are available at https://pypi.python.org/pypi/bio-apricot.
    Keywords: Sequence Analysis, Protein ; Software ; RNA-Binding Proteins -- Chemistry
    ISSN: 03051048
    E-ISSN: 1362-4962
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Nucleic acids research, August 2014, Vol.42(14), pp.8845-60
    Description: Phenotypically identical cells can dramatically vary with respect to behavior during their lifespan and this variation is reflected in their molecular composition such as the transcriptomic landscape. Single-cell transcriptomics using next-generation transcript sequencing (RNA-seq) is now emerging as a powerful tool to profile cell-to-cell variability on a genomic scale. Its application has already greatly impacted our conceptual understanding of diverse biological processes with broad implications for both basic and clinical research. Different single-cell RNA-seq protocols have been introduced and are reviewed here-each one with its own strengths and current limitations. We further provide an overview of the biological questions single-cell RNA-seq has been used to address, the major findings obtained from such studies, and current challenges and expected future developments in this booming field.
    Keywords: Gene Expression Profiling -- Methods ; High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing -- Methods ; Sequence Analysis, RNA -- Methods ; Single-Cell Analysis -- Methods
    ISSN: 03051048
    E-ISSN: 1362-4962
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  • 8
    In: EMBO Journal, 13 April 2017, Vol.36(8), pp.1029-1045
    Description: Research into post‐transcriptional control of mRNAs by small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) in the model bacteria and has mainly focused on sRNAs that associate with the RNA chaperone Hfq. However, the recent discovery of the protein ProQ as a common binding partner that stabilizes a distinct large class of structured sRNAs suggests that additional RNA regulons exist in these organisms. The cellular functions and molecular mechanisms of these new ProQ‐dependent sRNAs are largely unknown. Here, we report in Typhimurium the mode‐of‐action of RaiZ, a ProQ‐dependent sRNA that is made from the 3′ end of the mRNA encoding ribosome‐inactivating protein RaiA. We show that RaiZ is a base‐pairing sRNA that represses in the mRNA of histone‐like protein HU‐α. RaiZ forms an RNA duplex with the ribosome‐binding site of mRNA, facilitated by ProQ, to prevent 30S ribosome loading and protein synthesis of HU‐α. Similarities and differences between ProQ‐ and Hfq‐mediated regulation will be discussed. The enterobacterial sRNA RaiZ functions independent of the Hfq RNA chaperone via the recently identified general RNA‐binding protein ProQ. ProQ acts in a dual manner, stabilizing the sRNA and facilitating translational repression of the nucleid protein HU‐α. RaiZ is a small RNA produced by RNase E‐mediated cleavage of the raiA mRNA. RaiZ strongly binds RNA chaperone ProQ, leading to RaiZ stabilization. RaiZ represses translation of the hupA mRNA by base pairing with its ribosome‐binding site. ProQ and RaiZ jointly prevent initiating ribosomes from loading on hupA mRNA. The global RNA‐binding protein ProQ stabilizes bacterial small RNA RaiZ and facilitates translational repression of its target mRNA, thus exemplifying an Hfq‐independent RNA regulon.
    Keywords: Hu‐Α ; Proq ; Raiz ; Small Rna ; Translation Inhibition
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Nature, November 2018, Vol.563(7729), pp.121-125
    Description: Many evolutionarily distant pathogenic organisms have evolved similar survival strategies to evade the immune responses of their hosts. These include antigenic variation, through which an infecting organism prevents clearance by periodically altering the identity of proteins that are visible to the immune system of the host. Antigenic variation requires large reservoirs of immunologically diverse antigen genes, which are often generated through homologous recombination, as well as mechanisms to ensure the expression of one or very few antigens at any given time. Both homologous recombination and gene expression are affected by three-dimensional genome architecture and local DNA accessibility. Factors that link three-dimensional genome architecture, local chromatin conformation and antigenic variation have, to our knowledge, not yet been identified in any organism. One of the major obstacles to studying the role of genome architecture in antigenic variation has been the highly repetitive nature and heterozygosity of antigen-gene arrays, which has precluded complete genome assembly in many pathogens. Here we report the de novo haplotype-specific assembly and scaffolding of the long antigen-gene arrays of the model protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, using long-read sequencing technology and conserved features of chromosome folding. Genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) reveals a distinct partitioning of the genome, with antigen-encoding subtelomeric regions that are folded into distinct, highly compact compartments. In addition, we performed a range of analyses-Hi-C, fluorescence in situ hybridization, assays for transposase-accessible chromatin using sequencing and single-cell RNA sequencing-that showed that deletion of the histone variants H3.V and H4.V increases antigen-gene clustering, DNA accessibility across sites of antigen expression and switching of the expressed antigen isoform, via homologous recombination. Our analyses identify histone variants as a molecular link between global genome architecture, local chromatin conformation and antigenic variation.
    Keywords: Antigenic Variation -- Genetics ; Chromatin -- Genetics ; DNA, Protozoan -- Metabolism ; Genome -- Genetics ; Trypanosoma Brucei Brucei -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00280836
    E-ISSN: 1476-4687
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  • 10
    In: PLoS ONE, 2015, Vol.10(11)
    Description: Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum FZB42 is a representative of Gram-positive plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) that inhabit plant root environments. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms of bacteria-plant symbiosis, we have systematically analyzed the primary transcriptome of strain FZB42 grown under rhizosphere-mimicking conditions using differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq). Our analysis revealed 4,877 transcription start sites for protein-coding genes, identified genes differentially expressed under different growth conditions, and corrected many previously mis-annotated genes. We also identified a large number of riboswitches and cis- encoded antisense RNAs, as well as trans- encoded small noncoding RNAs that may play important roles in the gene regulation of Bacillus . Overall, our analyses provided a landscape of Bacillus primary transcriptome and improved the knowledge of rhizobacteria-host interactions.
    Keywords: Research Article
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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