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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Hydrobiologia, 2010, Vol.649(1), pp.379-383
    Description: To investigate the consequences of increased temperature and enhanced input of dissolved organic matter (DOM) into lakes for heterotrophicic bacteria and for mixotrophic algae which use DOM in addition to photosynthesis, the hypotheses were tested whether (1) both bacteria and mixotrophic algae benefit from increased input of DOM, or (2) increased DOM input enhances bacterial biomass and thereby decreases algal biomass. Growth experiments in batch cultures, exudation measurements, and competition experiments in chemostats were performed at two temperature levels. Increased temperature stimulated the autotrophic growth rate of Chlorella protothecoides . Bacteria and Chlorella increased their heterotrophic growth rates at higher DOM concentration at lower temperature whereas enhanced DOM concentration hardly stimulated their growth at higher temperature. In chemostats, enhanced input of soil extract increased both bacterial and algal biomass at lower temperature whereas bacterial biomass increased only slightly and algal biomass decreased at higher temperature. Thus, the temperature determines the response of microorganisms to enhanced DOM concentration.
    Keywords: Bacteria ; Mixotrophic algae ; Temperature ; DOM ; Climate change ; Chemostat
    ISSN: 0018-8158
    E-ISSN: 1573-5117
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, 2013, Vol.185(11), pp.9221-9236
    Description: The Bode catchment (Germany) shows strong land use gradients from forested parts of the National Park (23 % of total land cover) to agricultural (70 %) and urbanised areas (7 %). It is part of the Terrestrial Environmental Observatories of the German Helmholtz association. We performed a biogeochemical analysis of the entire river network. Surface water was sampled at 21 headwaters and at ten downstream sites, before (in early spring) and during the growing season (in late summer). Many parameters showed lower concentrations in headwaters than in downstream reaches, among them nutrients (ammonium, nitrate and phosphorus), dissolved copper and seston dry mass. Nitrate and phosphorus concentrations were positively related to the proportion of agricultural area within the catchment. Punctual anthropogenic loads affected some parameters such as chloride and arsenic. Chlorophyll a concentration and total phosphorus in surface waters were positively related. The concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was higher in summer than in spring, whereas the molecular size of DOC was lower in summer. The specific UV absorption at 254 nm, indicating the content of humic substances, was higher in headwaters than in downstream reaches and was positively related to the proportion of forest within the catchment. CO 2 oversaturation of the water was higher downstream compared with headwaters and was higher in summer than in spring. It was correlated negatively with oxygen saturation and positively with DOC concentration but negatively with DOC quality (molecular size and humic content). A principle component analysis clearly separated the effects of site (44 %) and season (15 %), demonstrating the strong effect of land use on biogeochemical parameters.
    Keywords: TERENO ; Land use ; Nutrients ; Heavy metals ; DOC ; Bode
    ISSN: 0167-6369
    E-ISSN: 1573-2959
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Microbial Ecology, 2010, Vol.60(3), pp.618-627
    Description: As extreme environmental conditions strongly affect bacterial community composition (BCC), we examined whether differences in pH—even at low pH—and in iron and sulfate concentrations lead to changes in BCC of acidic mining lakes. Thereby, we tested the following hypotheses: (1) diversity of the bacterial community in acidic lakes decreases with reducing pH, (2) BCC differs between epilimnion and hypolimnion, and (3) BCC in extremely acidic environments does not vary much over time. Therefore, we investigated the BCC of three acidic lakes with different pH values (2.3, 2.7, and 3.2) by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and subsequent sequencing of DGGE bands as well as catalyzed reporter deposition-FISH (CARD-FISH). BCC did not significantly vary among the studied lakes nor differ much between water layers. In contrast, BCC significantly changed over time, which is contradictory to our hypotheses. Bacterial communities were dominated by Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria, whereas Actino- and Acidobacteria rarely occurred. Cell numbers of both free and attached bacteria were positively related to DOC concentration. Overall, low pH and extreme chemical conditions of the studied lakes led to similar assemblages of bacteria with pronounced temporal differences. This notion indicates that temporal changes in environmental conditions including food web structure also affect unique communities of bacteria thriving at low pH.
    Keywords: Limnology ; Aquatic Ecological Zones ; Ph ; Mining Industry ; Universities And Colleges ; Sulfates;
    ISSN: 0095-3628
    E-ISSN: 1432-184X
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, 2015, Vol.187(7), pp.1-13
    Description: As benthic biofilms mediate essential functions in stream ecosystems (e.g., carbon flux, storage of nutrients and other substances), the element-specific regulation of the biofilm composition is of great interest. We tested whether (1) the elemental composition of biofilms is related to that of the water column and (2) there are different accumulation patterns from the dissolved phase (adsorption) and the particulate phase (incorporation of suspended matter). We analysed biomass parameters, nutrients and metals in biofilms and surface waters at 28 sites within a stream network (Bode catchment, Germany). Algal biomass in biofilms was dominated by diatoms. The P/C ratio in biofilms was positively related to total phosphorus of surface water (and to the proportion of agricultural area in the catchment) indicating phosphorus limitation of biofilms, whereas the N/C ratio was not related to nitrate levels of surface water, and neither the P/C nor the N/C ratio to the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of surface water. Biofilms were enriched in metals compared to their concentrations in water. The metals in biofilms were positively related to the concentration of dissolved metals in surface water for iron and strontium (but not for manganese, copper, zinc, arsenic or lead) and to the concentrations of particle-associated metals of surface waters for strontium and lead. Manganese and arsenic were the metals with a negative effect on the biomasses of biofilm diatoms and cyanobacteria. Overall, we observed element-specific accumulation patterns in biofilms with selected elements being related to the water column while others were probably subject to biofilm-internal processes.
    Keywords: Nutrients ; Stoichiometry ; Heavy metals ; Total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) ; Stream biofilms ; River Bode
    ISSN: 0167-6369
    E-ISSN: 1573-2959
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Microbial Ecology, 2017, Vol.74(3), pp.534-549
    Description: Microbial decomposition of terrestrial carbon may be enhanced by the addition of easily decomposable compounds, a phenomenon referred to as priming effect. We investigated the microbial decomposition of terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in one-stage and two-stage flow-through cultures (chemostats) in the absence and presence of growing phytoplankton as phytoplankton-derived organic matter might facilitate the mineralization of more refractory terrestrial compounds. Peat water and soil leachate were used as terrestrial substrates, and only slight DOC decomposition was observed in the absence of phytoplankton for both substrates. A priming effect was revealed via 14 C data. Priming was more pronounced for the peat water substrate than for the soil leachate. The total DOC concentrations increased for both substrates in the presence of phytoplankton due to exudation and cell lysis. Samples from the soil leachate experiments were analyzed using ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Predominantly, the same saturated, aliphatic molecules with H/C ratios 〉1.5 were completely decomposed in the absence and in the presence of phytoplankton. The decomposition of more stable molecules differed in their intensity. Oxidized and unsaturated molecules with H/C ratios 〈1.0 and O/C ratios 〉0.4 were more strongly decomposed in phytoplankton presence (i.e., under priming). We conclude that an aquatic priming effect is not easily detectable via net concentration changes alone, and that qualitative investigations of the DOC processed by bacterial decomposition are necessary to detect aquatic priming.
    Keywords: Radiocarbon ; C ; Ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry ; FT-ICR MS ; DOM quality
    ISSN: 0095-3628
    E-ISSN: 1432-184X
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Microbial Ecology, 2015, Vol.69(2), pp.361-371
    Description: The fate of allochthonous dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in aquatic systems is primarily controlled by the turnover of heterotrophic bacteria. However, the roles that abiotic and biotic factors such as light and DOC release by aquatic primary producers play in the microbial decomposition of allochthonous DOC is not well understood. We therefore tested if light and autochthonous DOC additions would increase allochthonous DOC decomposition rates and change bacterial growth efficiencies and community composition (BCC). We established continuous growth cultures with different inocula of natural bacterial communities and alder leaf leachates (DOC leaf ) with and without light exposure before amendment. Furthermore, we incubated DOC leaf together with autochthonous DOC from lysed phytoplankton cultures (DOC phyto ). Our results revealed that pretreatments of DOC leaf with light resulted in a doubling of bacterial growth efficiency (BGE), whereas additions of DOC phyto or combined additions of DOC phyto and light had no effect on BGE. The change in BGE was not accompanied by shifts in the phylogenetic structure of the BCC, but BCC was influenced by the DOC source. Our results highlight that a doubling of BGE is not necessarily accompanied by a shift in BCC and that BCC is more strongly affected by resource properties.
    Keywords: Bacterial growth efficiency ; Continuous cultures ; Carbon decomposition ; Leaf litter ; Photolysis
    ISSN: 0095-3628
    E-ISSN: 1432-184X
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Earth Sciences, 2017, Vol.76(1), pp.1-25
    Description: This article provides an overview about the Bode River catchment that was selected as the hydrological observatory and main region for hydro-ecological research within the TERrestrial ENvironmental Observatories Harz/Central German Lowland Observatory. It first provides information about the general characteristics of the catchment including climate, geology, soils, land use, water quality and aquatic ecology, followed by the description of the interdisciplinary research framework and the monitoring concept with the main components of the multi-scale and multi-temporal monitoring infrastructure. It also shows examples of interdisciplinary research projects aiming to advance the understanding of complex hydrological processes under natural and anthropogenic forcings and their interactions in a catchment context. The overview is complemented with research work conducted at a number of intensive research sites, each focusing on a particular functional zone or specific components and processes of the hydro-ecological system.
    Keywords: Monitoring ; Catchment ; Water quality ; Observatory ; Water fluxes
    ISSN: 1866-6280
    E-ISSN: 1866-6299
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Aquatic Sciences, 2009, Vol.71(1), pp.46-54
    Description: Terrestrial-derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) contributes significantly to the energetic basis of many aquatic food webs. Although heterotrophic bacteria are generally considered to be the sole consumers of DOC, algae and cyanobacteria of various taxonomic groups are also capable of exploiting this resource. We tested the hypothesis that algae can utilise DOC in the presence of bacteria if organic resources are supplied in intervals by photolysis of recalcitrant DOC. In short-term uptake experiments, we changed irradiation in the range of minutes. As model substrates, polymers of radiolabelled coumaric acid (PCA) were used, which during photolysis are known to release aromatic compounds comparable to terrestrial-derived and refractory DOC. Three cultured freshwater algae readily assimilated PCA photoproducts equivalent to a biomass-specific uptake of 5–60% of the bacterial competitors present. Algal substrate acquisition did not depend on whether PCA was photolysed continuously or in intervals. However, the data show that photoproducts of terrestrial DOC can be a significant resource for osmotrophic algae. In long-term growth experiments, interval light was applied one hour per day. We allowed cultured Chlamydomonas to compete for ambient DOC of low concentration. We found higher abundances of Chlamydomonas when cultures were irradiated intermittently rather than continuously. These data suggest that photolysis of DOC supports algal heterotrophy, and potentially facilitates growth, when light fluctuations are large, as during the diurnal light cycle. We concluded that osmotrophic algae can efficiently convert terrestrial carbon into the biomass of larger organisms of aquatic food webs.
    Keywords: DOC ; allochthonous ; osmotroph ; photolysis ; plankton ; food web
    ISSN: 1015-1621
    E-ISSN: 1420-9055
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