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Berlin Brandenburg

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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 2017, Vol.40(6), pp.875-885
    Description: Breast cancer patients often experience adverse physical side effects of medical treatments. According to the biobehavioral model of cancer stress and disease, life stress during diagnosis and treatment may negatively influence the trajectory of women’s physical health-related adjustment to breast cancer. This longitudinal study examined chronic and episodic stress as predictors of bothersome physical symptoms during the year after breast cancer diagnosis. Women diagnosed with breast cancer in the previous 4 months ( N  = 460) completed a life stress interview for contextual assessment of chronic and episodic stress severity at study entry and 9 months later. Physical symptom bother (e.g., pain, fatigue) was measured at study entry, every 6 weeks through 6 months, and at nine and 12 months. In multilevel structural equation modeling (MSEM) analyses, both chronic stress and episodic stress occurring shortly after diagnosis predicted greater physical symptom bother over the study period. Episodic stress reported to have occurred prior to diagnosis did not predict symptom bother in MSEM analyses, and the interaction between chronic and episodic stress on symptom bother was not significant. Results suggest that ongoing chronic stress and episodic stress occurring shortly after breast cancer diagnosis are important predictors of bothersome symptoms during and after cancer treatment. Screening for chronic stress and recent stressful life events in the months following diagnosis may help to identify breast cancer patients at risk for persistent and bothersome physical symptoms. Interventions to prevent or ameliorate treatment-related physical symptoms may confer added benefit by addressing ongoing non-cancer-related stress in women’s lives.
    Keywords: Stress ; Life events ; Breast cancer ; Physical symptoms ; Survivorship
    ISSN: 0160-7715
    E-ISSN: 1573-3521
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 2016, Vol.50(3), pp.370-384
    Description: BACKGROUND: Few studies examine whether dispositional approach and avoidance coping and stressor-specific coping strategies differentially predict physical adjustment to cancer-related stress.PURPOSE: This study examines dispositional and situational avoidance and approach coping as unique predictors of the bother women experience from physical symptoms after breast cancer treatment, as well as whether situational coping mediates the prediction of bother from physical symptoms by dispositional coping.METHOD: Breast cancer patients (N = 460) diagnosed within the past 3months completed self-report measures of dispositional coping at study entry and of situational coping and bother from physical symptoms every 6weeks through 6months.RESULTS: In multilevel structural equation modeling analyses, both dispositional and situational avoidance predict greater symptom bother. Dispositional, but not situational, approach predicts less symptom bother. Supporting mediation models, dispositional avoidance predicts more symptom bother indirectly through greater situational avoidance. Dispositional approach predicts less symptom bother through less situational avoidance.CONCLUSION: Psychosocial interventions to reduce cancer-related avoidance coping are warranted for cancer survivors who are high in dispositional avoidance and/or low in dispositional approach.
    Keywords: Avoidance ; Approach ; Coping ; Breast cancer ; Physical symptoms
    ISSN: 0883-6612
    E-ISSN: 1532-4796
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy, 2018, Vol.67(2), pp.285-298
    Description: Vaccines that elicit targeted tumor antigen-specific T-cell responses have the potential to be used as adjuvant therapy in patients with high risk of relapse. However, the responses induced by vaccines in cancer patients have generally been disappointing. To improve vaccine function, we investigated the possibility of exploiting the immunostimulatory capacity of type 1 Natural killer T (NKT) cells, a cell type enriched in lymphoid tissues that can trigger improved antigen-presenting function in dendritic cells (DCs). In this phase I dose escalation study, we treated eight patients with high-risk surgically resected stage II–IV melanoma with intravenous autologous monocyte-derived DCs loaded with the NKT cell agonist α-GalCer and peptides derived from the cancer testis antigen NY-ESO-1. Two synthetic long peptides spanning defined immunogenic regions of the NY-ESO-1 sequence were used. This therapy proved to be safe and immunologically effective, inducing increases in circulating NY-ESO-1-specific T cells that could be detected directly ex vivo in seven out of eight patients. These responses were achieved using as few as 5 × 10 5 peptide-loaded cells per dose. Analysis after in vitro restimulation showed increases in polyfunctional CD4 + and CD8 + T cells that were capable of manufacturing two or more cytokines simultaneously. Evidence of NKT cell proliferation and/or NKT cell-associated cytokine secretion was seen in most patients. In light of these strong responses, the concept of including NKT cell agonists in vaccine design requires further investigation.
    Keywords: Melanoma ; Dendritic cell ; NKT cell ; α-Galactosylceramide ; NY-ESO-1
    ISSN: 0340-7004
    E-ISSN: 1432-0851
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Immunogenetics, 1993, Vol.38(6), pp.387-399
    Description: The human immunoglobulin lambda-like ( IGLL ) genes, which are homologous to the human immunoglobulin lambda ( IGL ) light chain genes, are expressed only in pre-B cells and are involved in B cell development. Three IGLL genes, 14.1, 16.1, and 16.2 are present in humans as opposed to one, λ5 ( Igll ), found in the mouse. To precisely map the location of the human IGLL genes in relation to each other and to the human IGL gene locus, at 22q11.1–2, a somatic cell hybrid panel and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were used. Hybridization with a λ-like gene-specific DNA probe to somatic cell hybrids revealed that these genes reside on 22q11.2 between the breakpoint cluster region ( BCR ) and the Ewing sarcoma breakpoint at 22q12 and that gene 16.1 was located distal to genes 14.1 and 16.2 . Gene 14.1 was found by PFGE to be proximal to 16.2 by at least 30 kilobases (kb). A 210 kb Not I fragment containing genes 14.1 and 16.2 is adjacent to a 400 kb Not I fragment containing the BCR locus, which is just distal to the IGL-C ( IGL constant region) genes. We have determined that the IGLL genes 14.1 and 16.2 are approximately 670 kb and 690 to 830 kb distal, respectively, to the 3′-most IGL-C gene in the IGL gene locus, IGL-C7 . We thus show the first physical linkage of the IGL and the IGLL genes, 14.1 and 16.2 . We discuss the relevance of methylation patterns and CpG islands to expression, and the evolutionary significance of the IGLL gene duplications. Consistent with the GenBank nomenclature, these human IGLL genes will be referred to as IGLL1 (14.1) , IGLL2 (16.2) , and IGLL3 (16.1) , reflecting their position on chromosome 22, as established by this report.
    Keywords: Chromosomes, Human, Pair 22 ; Genes, Immunoglobulin -- Genetics ; Immunoglobulin Lambda-Chains -- Genetics;
    ISSN: 0093-7711
    E-ISSN: 1432-1211
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