Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    In: Psychophysiology, September 2013, Vol.50(9), pp.909-919
    Description: The present study investigates the relation of perceived arousal (continuous self‐rating), autonomic nervous system activity (heart rate, heart rate variability) and musical characteristics (sound intensity, musical rhythm) upon listening to a complex musical piece. Twenty amateur musicians listened to two performances of hopin's “Tristesse” with different rhythmic shapes. Besides conventional statistical methods for analyzing psychophysiological reactions (heart rate, respiration rate) and musical variables, semblance analysis was used. Perceived arousal correlated strongly with sound intensity; heart rate showed only a partial response to changes in sound intensity. Larger changes in heart rate were caused by the version with more rhythmic tension. The low‐/high‐frequency ratio of heart rate variability increased—whereas the high frequency component decreased—during music listening. We conclude that autonomic nervous system activity can be modulated not only by sound intensity but also by the interpreter's use of rhythmic tension. Semblance analysis enables us to track the subtle correlations between musical and physiological variables.
    Keywords: Music ; Subjective Arousal ; Sound Intensity ; Heart Rate ; Heart Rate Variability ; Respiration Rate ; Tempo Rubato ; Semblance Analysis
    ISSN: 0048-5772
    E-ISSN: 1469-8986
    E-ISSN: 15405958
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    In: Journal of Sleep Research, December 2019, Vol.28(6), pp.n/a-n/a
    Description: Initially independent lines of research suggest that sleep‐specific brain activity patterns, observed as electroencephalographic slow oscillatory and sleep spindle activity, promote memory consolidation and underlying synaptic refinements. Here, we further...
    Keywords: Coupling Direction ; Cross‐Frequency Coupling ; Memory Consolidation ; Modulation Index
    ISSN: 0962-1105
    E-ISSN: 1365-2869
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    In: Ecology and Evolution, July 2016, Vol.6(14), pp.5043-5056
    Description: Mangroves play an important role in carbon sequestration, but soil organic carbon () stocks differ between marine and estuarine mangroves, suggesting differing processes and drivers of accumulation. Here, we compared undegraded and degraded marine and estuarine mangroves in a regional approach across the Indonesian archipelago for their stocks and evaluated possible drivers imposed by nutrient limitations along the land‐to‐sea gradients. stocks in natural marine mangroves (271–572 Mg ha m) were much higher than under estuarine mangroves (100–315 Mg ha m) with a further decrease caused by degradation to 80–132 Mg ha m. Soils differed in C/N ratio (marine: 29–64; estuarine: 9–28), N (marine: −0.6 to 0.7‰; estuarine: 2.5 to 7.2‰), and plant‐available P (marine: 2.3–6.3 mg kg; estuarine: 0.16–1.8 mg kg). We found N and P supply of sea‐oriented mangroves primarily met by dominating symbiotic N fixation from air and P import from sea, while mangroves on the landward gradient increasingly covered their demand in N and P from allochthonous sources and recycling. Pioneer plants favored by degradation further increased nutrient recycling from soil resulting in smaller stocks in the topsoil. These processes explained the differences in stocks along the land‐to‐sea gradient in each mangrove type as well as the stock differences observed between estuarine and marine mangrove ecosystems. This first large‐scale evaluation of drivers of stocks under mangroves thus suggests a continuum in mangrove functioning across scales and ecotypes and additionally provides viable proxies for carbon stock estimations in or schemes. In a comparative study of mangrove ecosystem across the Indonesian archipelago, we found SOC stocks in natural marine (271–572 Mg ha m) mangroves much higher than under estuarine mangroves (100–315 Mg ha m). Soils differed in C/N ratio (marine: 29–64; estuarine: 9–28), N (marine: −0.6 to 0.7‰; estuarine: 2.5 to 7.2‰), and plant‐available P (marine: 2.3–6.3 mg kg; estuarine: 0.16–1.8 mg kg). N and P supply of sea‐oriented mangroves was primarily met by dominating symbiotic N fixation from air and P import from sea, while mangroves on the landward gradient increasingly covered their demand in N and P via SOM recycling. These processes explained the differences in SOC stocks along the land‐to‐sea gradient in each mangrove type as well as the SOC stock differences observed between estuarine and marine mangrove ecosystems.
    Keywords: Ecosystem Functioning ; Global Change ; Indonesia ; Marine And Estuarine Mangroves ; Nitrogen ; Phosphorus ; Soil Organic Carbon ; Stable Isotopes
    ISSN: 2045-7758
    E-ISSN: 2045-7758
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages