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  • Article  (85)
  • Wiley Online Library  (85)
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  • Article  (85)
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  • 1
    In: Molecular Microbiology, April 2012, Vol.84(1), pp.1-5
    Description: The transcription factor CsgD governing the production of curli fimbriae and cellulose is a key player in the complex regulatory circuit that decides whether form biofilms. The gene itself is tightly controlled at the level of transcription by a large array of DNA‐binding proteins, but what happens after transcription is less understood. In this issue of , Jørgensen (2012), Mika (2012) and Thomason (2012) report on small RNAs (McaS, RprA and GcvB) that together with the RNA‐chaperone Hfq regulate the mRNAs of and other biofilm genes, and illustrate the burgeoning concept that the 5′ region of bacterial mRNA serves as a hub for sRNA‐mediated signal integration at the post‐transcriptional level.
    Keywords: Transcription (Genetics) ; Proteins ; Messenger Rna ; Genes ; Cellulose;
    ISSN: 0950-382X
    E-ISSN: 1365-2958
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  • 2
    In: EMBO Journal, 03 July 2013, Vol.32(13), pp.1802-1804
    Description: CRISPR systems not only defend bacteria from foreign DNA but also contribute to pathogenicity, by regulating endogenous gene expression to evade host innate immune responses.
    Keywords: Animals–Immunology ; Female–Pathogenicity ; Gammaproteobacteria–Immunology ; Gammaproteobacteria–Immunology ; Immune Evasion–Immunology ; Immunity, Innate–Immunology ; Germany ; Prokaryotes ; Gene Expression ; Eukaryotes ; Bacteria ; Molecular Biology;
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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  • 3
    In: EMBO Journal, 02 July 2018, Vol.37(13), pp.n/a-n/a
    Description: Long non‐coding s (lncs) play important roles in many cellular pathways, but their contribution to the defense of eukaryotic cells against pathogens remains poorly understood. A new study from Imamura in reports that infection in human cells impacts nuclear decay, which in turn drives the accumulation of otherwise unstable nuclear lncs, some of which may have protective effects against this common bacterial pathogen. These unexpected findings demand more efforts to fully decrypt the molecular functions of lncs in innate and adaptive immunity. infection impairs the nuclear RNA decay machinery in human cells, increasing the abundance of long non‐coding RNAs with a role in innate immunity.
    Keywords: Pathogens ; Immunity ; Infections ; Pathogens ; Molecular Chains ; Salmonella ; Bacterial Infections ; Pathogens ; Ribonucleic Acid–RNA ; Ribonucleic Acid–RNA ; Adaptive Immunity;
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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  • 4
    In: Molecular Microbiology, December 2010, Vol.78(6), pp.1327-1331
    Description: Although most bacterial small RNAs act to repress target mRNAs, some also activate messengers. The predominant mode of activation has been seen in ‘anti‐antisense’ regulation whereby a small RNA prevents the formation of an inhibitory 5′ mRNA structure that otherwise impairs translational initiation and protein synthesis. The translational activation might also stabilize the target yet this was considered a secondary effect in the examples known thus far. Two recent papers in investigate post‐transcriptional activation of collagenase mRNA by VR‐RNA, and streptokinase mRNA by FasX RNA, to suggest that small RNAs exert positive regulation of virulence genes primarily at the level of mRNA stabilization.
    Keywords: Protein Synthesis ; Messenger Rna;
    ISSN: 0950-382X
    E-ISSN: 1365-2958
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  • 5
    In: EMBO Journal, 03 June 2015, Vol.34(11), pp.1478-1492
    Description: There is an expanding list of examples by which one can posttranscriptionally influence the expression of others. This can involve sponges that sequester regulatory s of s in the same regulon, but the underlying molecular mechanism of such cross talk remains little understood. Here, we report sponge‐mediated cross talk in the posttranscriptional network of GcvB, a conserved Hfq‐dependent small with one of the largest regulons known in bacteria. We show that decay from the locus encoding an amino acid transporter generates a stable fragment (SroC) that base‐pairs with GcvB. This interaction triggers the degradation of GcvB by ase E, alleviating the GcvB‐mediated repression of other amino acid‐related transport and metabolic genes. Intriguingly, since the itself is a target of GcvB, the SroC sponge seems to enable both an internal feed‐forward loop to activate its parental in and activation of many ‐encoded s in the same pathway. Disabling this cross talk affects bacterial growth when peptides are the sole carbon and nitrogen sources. Decay of the bacterial GcvB , which keeps it from regulating its targets, is triggered by a 3′‐‐derived fragment from a target . This ability of s to compete for regulatory interaction presents a new mode of cross talk in bacteria. . Decay of the bacterial GcvB s, which keeps it from regulating its m targets, is triggered by a 3′‐‐derived fragment from a target m. This ability of ms to compete for regulatory interaction presents a new mode of cross talk in bacteria.
    Keywords: G Cv B ; H Fq ; Noncoding Rna ; Rn Ase E ; S Ro C
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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  • 6
    In: EMBO Journal, 01 February 2017, Vol.36(3), pp.245-247
    Description: While bacteria were long thought to rely primarily on transcriptional control, it is now well established that they also use numerous small s to regulate translation and stability. There has recently been a surge in studies, including one by Waters ([Waters SA, 2017]) in this issue of , that have used clever variations of the ‐seq technique to comprehensively map small –target networks. Several recent studies have used clever variations of RNA‐seq techniques to comprehensively map small RNA–target networks involved in controlling bacterial gene expression.
    Keywords: Biology ; Chemistry;
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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  • 7
    In: Molecular Microbiology, November 2011, Vol.82(4), pp.797-806
    Description: Founded on ground‐breaking discoveries such as the operon model by Jacob and Monod more than 50 years ago, molecular microbiology is now one of the most vibrant disciplines of the life sciences. The first Mol Micro Meeting Würzburg (‘M3W’) hosted more than 160 scientists from 14 countries to exchange their latest ideas in this field of research. Divided into the four main sessions Gene Regulation, Pathogenesis, Microbial Cell Biology and Signalling, the conference provided insight into current advances and future goals and challenges.
    Keywords: Microbiology ; Life Sciences ; Scientists ; Bacteria;
    ISSN: 0950-382X
    E-ISSN: 1365-2958
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  • 8
    In: EMBO Journal, 17 October 2012, Vol.31(20), pp.4005-4019
    Description: The small RNAs associated with the protein Hfq constitute one of the largest classes of post‐transcriptional regulators known to date. Most previously investigated members of this class are encoded by conserved free‐standing genes. Here, deep sequencing of Hfq‐bound transcripts from multiple stages of growth of revealed a plethora of new small RNA species from within mRNA loci, including DapZ, which overlaps with the 3′ region of the biosynthetic gene, . Synthesis of the DapZ small RNA is independent of DapB protein synthesis, and is controlled by HilD, the master regulator of invasion genes. DapZ carries a short G/U‐rich domain similar to that of the globally acting GcvB small RNA, and uses GcvB‐like seed pairing to repress translation of the major ABC transporters, DppA and OppA. This exemplifies double functional output from an mRNA locus by the production of both a protein and an Hfq‐dependent ‐acting RNA. Our atlas of Hfq targets suggests that the 3′ regions of mRNA genes constitute a rich reservoir that provides the Hfq network with new regulatory small RNAs. Deep sequencing of Hfq‐binding RNAs isolated from at different growth stages reveals that the 3′ UTR of bacterial mRNAs are a rich source of regulatory small RNAs which modulate gene expression in trans.
    Keywords: Abc Transporter ; Dapz ; Gcvb ; Hfq ; 3′ Utr
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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  • 9
    In: EMBO Journal, 13 November 2013, Vol.32(22), pp.2963-2979
    Description: Small RNAs use a diversity of well‐characterized mechanisms to repress mRNAs, but how they activate gene expression at the mRNA level remains not well understood. The predominant activation mechanism of Hfq‐associated small RNAs has been translational control whereby base pairing with the target prevents the formation of an intrinsic inhibitory structure in the mRNA and promotes translation initiation. Here, we report a translation‐independent mechanism whereby the small RNA RydC selectively activates the longer of two isoforms of mRNA (encoding cyclopropane fatty acid synthase) in . Target activation is achieved through seed pairing of the pseudoknot‐exposed, conserved 5′ end of RydC to an upstream region of the mRNA. The seed pairing stabilizes the messenger, likely by interfering directly with RNase E‐mediated decay in the 5′ untranslated region. Intriguingly, this mechanism is generic such that the activation is equally achieved by seed pairing of unrelated small RNAs, suggesting that this mechanism may be utilized in the design of RNA‐controlled synthetic circuits. Physiologically, RydC is the first small RNA known to regulate membrane stability. The small RNA RydC stabilizes target mRNAs in a translation‐independent manner through base pairing to the 5′UTR, blocking RNase E access. Cyclopropane fatty acid synthase is a target for RydC, providing the first link between sRNA regulation and membrane biosynthesis in bacteria.
    Keywords: Fatty Acid Synthesis ; Hfq ; Mrna Activation ; Noncoding Rna ; Small Rna
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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  • 10
    In: EMBO Journal, 18 May 2011, Vol.30(10), pp.1977-1989
    Description: MicroRNAs have well‐established roles in eukaryotic host responses to viruses and extracellular bacterial pathogens. In contrast, microRNA responses to invasive bacteria have remained unknown. Here, we report cell type‐dependent microRNA regulations upon infection of mammalian cells with the enteroinvasive pathogen, Typhimurium. Murine macrophages strongly upregulate NF‐κB associated microRNAs; strikingly, these regulations which are induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) occur and persist regardless of successful host invasion and/or replication, or whether an inflammatory response is mounted, suggesting that microRNAs belong to the first line of anti‐bacterial defence. However, a suppression of the global immune regulator miR‐155 in endotoxin‐tolerant macrophages revealed that microRNA responses also depend on the status of infected cells. This study identifies the family as the common denominator of ‐regulated microRNAs in macrophages and epithelial cells, and suggests that repression of relieves cytokine IL‐6 and IL‐10 mRNAs from negative post‐transcriptional control. Our results establish a paradigm of microRNA‐mediated feed‐forward activation of inflammatory factors when mammalian cells are targeted by bacterial pathogens. This study describes the global mammalian micoRNA response to infection and the role of miRNAs in regulating the post‐transcriptional control of inflammatory cytokines.
    Keywords: Il‐10 ; Let‐7 ; Mir‐155 ; Mirna ; Salmonella
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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