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  • Ecosystems
  • Wiley Online Library  (5)
  • 1
    In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Water, November 2017, Vol.4(6), pp.n/a-n/a
    Description: We review the state‐of‐the‐art of cross‐disciplinary knowledge on phosphorus (P) cycling in temperate forest ecosystems, focused at studies from hydrology, biology, biogeochemistry, soil‐, and geosciences. Changes in soil P stocks during long‐term ecosystem development are addressed briefly; the general ranges of specific P pools and P fluxes within the ecosystem and the presumed underlying processes are covered more in depth. Wherever possible, we differentiate between coniferous and deciduous forests. As the most important P pools, mineral soil, forest floor, vegetation, and microbial biomass are described in terms of pool size, molecular composition, and turnover. Litterfall, soil water seepage, atmospheric deposition, and biotic uptake as the most studied P fluxes in the forest ecosystem are discussed in detail, spotlighting biogeochemical processes relevant for mobilization and retention of P in the rooting zone. Through a meta‐analysis of available literature, we build a dataset that allows the quantification of major P‐cycle components in temperate forests in terms of range and distribution, highlighting similarities and differences between coniferous and deciduous forests. The two forest types are notably distinct in their distribution of P within compartments of the plant biomass and forest floor. The possibility to construct closed local P balances is often hindered by missing information on fluxes of dissolved and particulate P across the ecosystem boundary, be it in the atmosphere, soil, or on the surface. These fluxes are irregular in space and time and feature large overall mass fluxes but comparatively small P fluxes, making the latter one difficult to quantify. 2017, 4:e1243. doi: 10.1002/wat2.1243 This article is categorized under: A schematic respresentation of the Phosphorus cycle in temperate forests. Pools and fluxes are scaled to their average size. See the full paper for more detailed information and data sources.
    Keywords: Phosphorus Cycle ; Phosphorus ; Phosphorus Cycle ; Compartments ; Phosphorus ; Uptake ; Biogeochemistry ; Biomass ; Plant Biomass ; Environmental Changes ; Soil Water ; Pools ; Soil Water ; Distribution ; Composition ; Forests ; Phosphorus Cycle ; Biogeochemistry ; Biogeochemistry ; Biomass ; Biology ; Phosphorus ; Forests ; Microorganisms ; Ecosystems ; Moisture Content ; Forest Floor ; Forest Ecosystems ; Forests ; Stocks ; Hydrology ; Forests ; Rooting ; Pools ; Seepage ; Components ; Hydrology ; Deciduous Forests ; Forest Floor ; Fluxes ; Atmospheric Pollutant Deposition ; Soils ; Hydrology ; Seepage ; Biomass ; Hydrology ; Forest Biomass;
    ISSN: 2049-1948
    E-ISSN: 2049-1948
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, April 2016, Vol.179(2), pp.129-135
    Description: Phosphorus is one of the major limiting factors of primary productivity in terrestrial ecosystems and, thus, the P demand of plants might be among the most important drivers of soil and ecosystem development. The P cycling in forest ecosystems seems an ideal example to illustrate the concept of ecosystem nutrition. Ecosystem nutrition combines and extents the traditional concepts of nutrient cycling and ecosystem ecology. The major extension is to consider also the loading and unloading of nutrient cycles and the impact of nutrient acquiring and recycling processes on overall ecosystem properties. Ecosystem nutrition aims to integrate nutrient related aspects at different scales and in different ecosystem compartments including all processes, interactions and feedbacks associated with the nutrition of an ecosystem. We review numerous previous studies dealing with P nutrition from this ecosystem nutrition perspective. The available information contributes to the description of basic ecosystem characteristics such as emergence, hierarchy, and robustness. In result, we were able to refine Odum's hypothesis on P nutrition strategies along ecosystem succession to substrate related ecosystem nutrition and development. We hypothesize that at sites rich in mineral‐bound P, plant and microbial communities tend to introduce P from primary minerals into the biogeochemical P cycle (acquiring systems), and hence the tightness of the P cycle is of minor relevance for ecosystem functioning. In contrast, tight P recycling is a crucial emergent property of forest ecosystems established at sites poor in mineral bound P (recycling systems). We conclude that the integration of knowledge on nutrient cycling, soil science, and ecosystem ecology into holistic ecosystem nutrition will provide an entirely new view on soil–plant–microbe interactions.
    Keywords: Ecosystem Properties ; P Recycling ; P Nutrition Strategy ; Forest Nutrition ; P Acquiring
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, August 2016, Vol.179(4), pp.472-480
    Description: Among several environmental factors shaping soil microbial communities the impact of soil nutrients is of special interest. While continuous application mainly of N and P dramatically shifts community composition during fertilization, it remains unclear whether this effect is consistent in generic, unfertilized beech forest ecosystems of Germany, where differences in nutrient contents are mostly a result of the parental material and climatic conditions. We postulate that in such ecosystems nutrient effects are less pronounced due to the possibility of the soil microbiome to adapt to the corresponding conditions over decades and the vegetation acts as the major driver. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the bacterial community composition in five different German beech dominated forest soils, representing a natural gradient of total‐ and easily available mineral‐P. A community fingerprinting approach was performed using terminal‐Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis of the 16S rRNA gene, while abundance of bacteria was measured applying quantitative real‐time PCR. Bacterial communities at the five forest sites were distinctly separated, with strongest differences between the end‐members of the P‐gradient. However the majority of identified microbial groups (43%) were present at all sites, forming a core microbiome independent from the differences in soil chemical properties. Especially in the P‐deficient soil the abundance of unique bacterial groups was highly increased, indicating a special adaption of the community to P limitation at this site. In this regard Correspondence Analysis elucidated that exclusively soil pH significantly affected community composition at the investigated sites. In contrast soil C, N and P contents did mainly affect the overall abundance of bacteria.
    Keywords: Core Microbiome ; Forest Soil ; Nutrient Content ; Diversity
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, October 2010, Vol.173(5), pp.644-653
    Description: Riparian forests are assumed to play a crucial role in the global carbon cycle. However, little data are available on C stocks of floodplains in comparison to other terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, we quantified the C stocks of aboveground biomass and soils of riparian vegetation types at 76 sampling sites in the Donau‐Auen National Park in Austria. Based on our results and a remotely sensed vegetation map, we estimated total C stocks. Carbon stocks in soils (up to 354 t ha within 1 m below surface) were huge compared to other terrestrial ecosystems. As expected, soils of different vegetation types showed different texture with a higher percentage of sandy soils at the softwood sites, while loamy soils prevailed at hardwood sites. Total C stocks of vegetation types were significantly different, but reflect differences in woody plant biomass rather than in soil C stocks. Mature hardwood and cottonwood forests proved to have significantly higher total C stocks (474 and 403 t ha, respectively) than young reforestations (217 t ha) and meadows (212 t ha). The C pools of softwood forests (356 t ha) ranged between those of hardwood/cottonwood forests and of reforestations/meadows. Our study proves the relevance of floodplains as possible C sinks, which should be increasingly taken into account for river management. Furthermore, we conclude that plant‐species distribution does not indicate the conditions of sedimentation and soil C sequestration over the time span of interest for the development of soil C stocks.
    Keywords: Carbon Stocks ; Organic Carbon ; Donau‐Auen National Park ; Fluvial Ecosystems ; Riparian Forest
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
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  • 5
    In: European Journal of Soil Science, May 2019, Vol.70(3), pp.454-465
    Description: Soil structural traits provide links between soil structure and ecosystem functioning. The size and stability of soil aggregates are assumed to provide information on aggregate formation and turnover. A standard method to analyse these traits is to determine the mass distribution on sieves. The major drawback of this method is the small size resolution because of a small number of size classes. A promising, yet still unexplored, method for size distribution analysis in soil science, is dynamic image analysis, which foremost allows a much larger diameter resolution and the assessment of both size and shape distributions. The aim of our study was to validate the applicability of dynamic digital image analysis in combination with sonication to characterize the size and shape distribution and the stability of aggregates. We used two different heterogeneous reference materials and three different soil samples with different aggregate stabilities to test this method. The soil samples were chosen based on increasing clay, humus and calcium carbonate contents. The method yielded reproducible results for diameter and shape distributions for both reference materials and soil samples. The most important improvement compared to well‐established methods was the extremely large size resolution. This allows specification of the pattern of diameter‐dependent breakup curves by relating them to specific soil properties. The information on sphericity adds supplementary information on the aggregates released. We found much lower sphericity of 1‐mm aggregates mobilized from topsoil samples formed from the activity of living organisms than aggregates mobilized from subsoil samples formed mainly by physicochemical processes. Highlights Our aim was to validate dynamic digital image analysis to characterize soil aggregates.Dynamic image analysis allows high resolution and shape analysis compared to established methods.The method yielded reproducible results for diameter and shape distributions.We established high‐resolution disruption patterns of aggregates enabling new approaches in future research.
    Keywords: Aggregate Breakdown Dynamics ; Particle‐Size Distribution ; Ultrasonic Dispersion
    ISSN: 1351-0754
    E-ISSN: 1365-2389
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