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Berlin Brandenburg

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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Advances in Water Resources, Jan, 2013, Vol.51, p.217(30)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.advwatres.2012.07.018 Byline: Dorthe Wildenschild (a), Adrian P. Sheppard (b) Keywords: X-ray tomography; Porous media characterization; Multi-phase flow; Image analysis and quantification Abstract: a* We provide a review of recent developments and advances in pore-scale X-ray tomographic imaging of subsurface porous media. a* The particular focus is on immiscible multi-phase fluid flow and quantitative analyses. a* Advances in both imaging techniques and image processing are discussed and future trends are addressed. Author Affiliation: (a) School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA (b) Department of Applied Mathematics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    Keywords: Image Processing Equipment -- Methods ; Image Processing -- Methods
    ISSN: 0309-1708
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Advances in Water Resources, Sept, 2012, Vol.46, p.55(8)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.advwatres.2012.05.009 Byline: Ryan T. Armstrong (a), Mark L. Porter (b), Dorthe Wildenschild (a) Keywords: Capillary pressure; Interfacial curvature; Young-Laplace; Drainage; Imbibition; Computed microtomography Abstract: a* Computed tomography datasets were analyzed for interfacial curvature. a* Curvature and transducer-based measurements compare well. a* Disconnected and connected phase interfaces have significantly different curvatures. a* Connected phase interfacial curvature relaxes as the system equilibrates. Author Affiliation: (a) School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, 103 Gleeson Hall Corvallis, OR 97331-2702, United States (b) Los Alamos National Laboratory, Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos, NM 87545, United States Article History: Received 12 December 2011; Revised 18 May 2012; Accepted 18 May 2012
    ISSN: 0309-1708
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Advances in Water Resources, January 2013, Vol.51, pp.217-246
    Description: ► We provide a review of recent developments and advances in pore-scale X-ray tomographic imaging of subsurface porous media. ► The particular focus is on immiscible multi-phase fluid flow and quantitative analyses. ► Advances in both imaging techniques and image processing are discussed and future trends are addressed. We report here on recent developments and advances in pore-scale X-ray tomographic imaging of subsurface porous media. Our particular focus is on immiscible multi-phase fluid flow, i.e., the displacement of one immiscible fluid by another inside a porous material, which is of central importance to many natural and engineered processes. Multiphase flow and displacement can pose a rather difficult problem, both because the underlying physics is complex, and also because standard laboratory investigation reveals little about the mechanisms that control micro-scale processes. X-ray microtomographic imaging is a non-destructive technique for quantifying these processes in three dimensions within individual pores, and as we report here, with rapidly increasing spatial and temporal resolution.
    Keywords: X-Ray Tomography ; Porous Media Characterization ; Multi-Phase Flow ; Image Analysis and Quantification ; Engineering
    ISSN: 0309-1708
    E-ISSN: 1872-9657
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Advances in Water Resources, September 2012, Vol.46, pp.55-62
    Description: ► Computed tomography datasets were analyzed for interfacial curvature. ► Curvature and transducer-based measurements compare well. ► Disconnected and connected phase interfaces have significantly different curvatures. ► Connected phase interfacial curvature relaxes as the system equilibrates. Synchrotron-based tomographic datasets of oil–water drainage and imbibition cycles have been analyzed to quantify phase saturations and interfacial curvature as well as connected and disconnected fluid configurations. This allows for close observation of the drainage and imbibition processes, assessment of equilibrium states, and studying the effects of fluid phase disconnection and reconnection on the resulting capillary pressures and interfacial curvatures. Based on this analysis estimates of capillary pressure calculated from interfacial curvature can be compared to capillary pressure measured externally with a transducer. Results show good agreement between curvature-based and transducer-based measurements when connected phase interfaces are considered. Curvature measurements show a strong dependence on whether an interface is formed by connected or disconnected fluid and the time allowed for equilibration. The favorable agreement between curvature-based and transducer-based capillary pressure measurements shows promise for the use of image-based estimates of capillary pressure for interfaces that cannot be probed with external transducers as well as opportunities for a detailed assessment of interfacial curvature during drainage and imbibition.
    Keywords: Capillary Pressure ; Interfacial Curvature ; Young–Laplace ; Drainage ; Imbibition ; Computed Microtomography ; Engineering
    ISSN: 0309-1708
    E-ISSN: 1872-9657
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Advances in Water Resources, December 2018, Vol.122, pp.251-262
    Description: We introduce a new method for defining a pore-body to pore-throat aspect ratio from segmented 3D image data, based on a connectivity metric applicable to porous media with widely varying pore-space connectivity and pore-space morphology. The ‘Morphological Aspect Ratio’ (MAR) is identified from the pore-space connectivity, using the Euler number (χ) as a function of a pore-space size defined by a morphological opening (erosion and dilation) of the pore space. We show that residual non-wetting phase trapping in porous media resulting from secondary imbibition scales with the MAR. Trapping was investigated in a Bentheimer sandstone core and five columns of partially sintered glass-particle packs with different combinations of glass beads and crushed glass ranging in size from 0.3 to 1.2 mm, resulting in porosity levels of 22–36%. Residual non-wetting phase trapping scales with the MAR, in contrast to the aspect ratio calculated with the traditional Maximum Inscribed Sphere (MIS) algorithm applied after partitioning the pore space into pore bodies and pore throats with a watershed transform followed by a region merging algorithm. This novel aspect ratio is a robust method that is less affected by segmentation errors compared to other methods for calculating aspect ratio and is applicable to residual non-wetting phase trapping resulting from capillary-driven flow of a wetting fluid through water-wet porous media.
    Keywords: Connectivity ; Capillary-Dominated Flow ; Morphological Opening ; Nonwetting Phase Trapping ; X-Ray Micro-Tomography ; Porous Media ; Engineering
    ISSN: 0309-1708
    E-ISSN: 1872-9657
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Advances in Water Resources, Dec, 2013, Vol.62, p.47(12)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.advwatres.2013.09.015 Byline: Anna L. Herring, Elizabeth J. Harper, Linnea Andersson, Adrian Sheppard, Brian K. Bay, Dorthe Wildenschild Abstract: acents We examine the effect of NW phase connectivity on capillary trapping in porous media. acents We establish relationships of NW connectivity as a function of NW saturation. acents High initial NW connectivity results in reduced trapping for Bentheimer sandstone. acents Multiple drainage-imbibition cycles do not change the NW connectivity of the media. acents A WAG injection scheme reduces connectivity and promotes capillary trapping of CO.sub.2. Article History: Received 15 May 2013; Revised 25 September 2013; Accepted 27 September 2013
    ISSN: 0309-1708
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Advances in Water Resources, April 2018, Vol.114, pp.249-260
    Description: We present an improved method for estimating interfacial curvatures from x-ray computed microtomography (CMT) data that significantly advances the potential for this tool to unravel the mechanisms and phenomena associated with multi-phase fluid motion in porous media. CMT data, used to analyze the spatial distribution and capillary pressure–saturation ( – ) relationships of liquid phases, requires accurate estimates of interfacial curvature. Our improved method for curvature estimation combines selective interface modification and distance weighting approaches. It was verified against synthetic (analytical computer-generated) and real image data sets, demonstrating a vast improvement over previous methods. Using this new tool on a previously published data set (multiphase flow) yielded important new insights regarding the pressure state of the disconnected nonwetting phase during drainage and imbibition. The trapped and disconnected non-wetting phase delimits its own hysteretic – curve that inhabits the space within the main hysteretic – loop of the connected wetting phase. Data suggests that the pressure of the disconnected, non-wetting phase is strongly modified by the pore geometry rather than solely by the bulk liquid phase that surrounds it.
    Keywords: Multiphase Flow ; Porous Media ; Computed Microtomography ; Curvature ; Capillary Pressure Measurement ; Engineering
    ISSN: 0309-1708
    E-ISSN: 1872-9657
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Advances in Water Resources, May 2015, Vol.79, pp.91-102
    Description: We investigate trapping of a nonwetting (NW) phase, air, within Bentheimer sandstone cores during drainage–imbibition flow experiments, as quantified on a three dimensional (3D) pore-scale basis via x-ray computed microtomography (X-ray CMT). The wetting (W) fluid in these experiments was deionized water doped with potassium iodide (1:6 by weight). We interpret these experiments based on the capillary–viscosity–gravity force dominance exhibited by the Bentheimer–air–brine system and compare to a wide range of previous drainage–imbibition experiments in different media and with different fluids. From this analysis, we conclude that viscous and capillary forces dominate in the Bentheimer–air–brine system as well as in the Bentheimer–supercritical CO –brine system. In addition, we further develop the relationship between initial (post-drainage) NW phase connectivity and residual (post-imbibition) trapped NW phase saturation, while also taking into account initial NW phase saturation and imbibition capillary number. We quantify NW phase connectivity via a topological measure as well as by a statistical percolation metric. These metrics are evaluated for their utility and appropriateness in quantifying NW phase connectivity within porous media. Here, we find that there is a linear relationship between initial NW phase connectivity (as quantified by the normalized Euler number, ) and capillary trapping efficiency; for a given imbibition capillary number, capillary trapping efficiency (residual NW phase saturation normalized by initial NW phase saturation) can decrease by up to 60% as initial NW phase connectivity increases from low connectivity ( ≈ 0) to very high connectivity ( ≈ 1). We propose that multiphase fluid-porous medium systems can be engineered to achieve a desired residual state (optimal NW phase saturation) by considering the dominant forces at play in the system along with the impacts of NW phase topology within the porous media, and we illustrate these concepts by considering supercritical CO sequestration scenarios.
    Keywords: Co2 Sequestration ; Topology ; Pore-Scale ; Force Balance ; Nonwetting Phase Trapping ; X-Ray Microtomography ; Engineering
    ISSN: 0309-1708
    E-ISSN: 1872-9657
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Advances in Water Resources, September 2016, Vol.95, pp.288-301
    Description: Biofilm growth changes many physical properties of porous media such as porosity, permeability and mass transport parameters. The growth depends on various environmental conditions, and in particular, on flow rates. Modeling the evolution of such properties is difficult both at the porescale where the phase morphology can be distinguished, as well as during upscaling to the corescale effective properties. Experimental data on biofilm growth is also limited because its collection can interfere with the growth, while imaging itself presents challenges. In this paper we combine insight from imaging, experiments, and numerical simulations and visualization. The experimental dataset is based on glass beads domain inoculated by biomass which is subjected to various flow conditions promoting the growth of biomass and the appearance of a biofilm phase. The domain is imaged and the imaging data is used directly by a computational model for flow and transport. The results of the computational flow model are upscaled to produce conductivities which compare well with the experimentally obtained hydraulic properties of the medium. The flow model is also coupled to a newly developed biomass–nutrient growth model, and the model reproduces morphologies qualitatively similar to those observed in the experiment.
    Keywords: Porescale Modeling ; Imaging Porous Media ; Microtomography ; Biomass and Biofilm Growth ; Parabolic Variational Inequality ; Multicomponent Multiphase Flow and Transport in Porous Media ; Engineering
    ISSN: 0309-1708
    E-ISSN: 1872-9657
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Advances in Water Resources, 2015, Vol.79, p.91(12)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.advwatres.2015.02.005 Byline: Anna L. Herring, Linnea Andersson, Steffen Schluter, Adrian Sheppard, Dorthe Wildenschild Abstract: * We investigate residual trapping of nonwetting (NW) phase (air) in sandstone cores. * We describe initial air configurations with connectivity metrics. * Factors influencing trapping are a function of dominant pore-scale forces. * Trapping efficiency decreases as initial air connectivity increases. * Pore-scale forces and NW connectivity are important for engineering applications. Article History: Received 23 August 2014; Revised 6 February 2015; Accepted 9 February 2015
    ISSN: 0309-1708
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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