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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Applied Geochemistry, June, 2011, Vol.26, p.S89-S93
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeochem.2011.03.038 Byline: Lin Ma (a)(b), Lixin Jin (a)(b), Susan L. Brantley (a) Abstract: a* Statistical analysis on element concentrations of bedrock, regolith, and sediments. a* Element groups with different geochemical behaviors during soil formation. a* Mineralogical, cycling, and geochemical controls during chemical weathering. Author Affiliation: (a) Earth and Environmental Systems Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA (b) Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968, USA
    Keywords: Shales -- Analysis ; Shales -- Chemical Properties
    ISSN: 0883-2927
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Applied Geochemistry, June, 2011, Vol.26, p.S40-S43
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeochem.2011.03.024 Byline: Elizabeth M. Herndon (a), Susan L. Brantley (b) Abstract: a* Soils throughout the United States and Europe are enriched in Mn near zones of industrial input. a* The decline of Mn in rivers reflects the decline of Mn in air since the mid-20th century. a* River chemistry can be used to evaluate the removal of Mn from soils. a* Rapid biocycling contributes to the retention of Mn in affected ecosystems. Author Affiliation: (a) 315 Hosler Bldg., Department of Geosciences, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA (b) 2217 Earth and Engineering Building, Earth and Environmental Systems Institute, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
    Keywords: Manganese (Metal) ; Rivers
    ISSN: 0883-2927
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Applied Geochemistry, June, 2011, Vol.26, p.S51-S56
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeochem.2011.03.027 Byline: Lixin Jin (a)(b), Susan L. Brantley (a) Abstract: a* Soils in a swale are controlled by weathering and colluvium sediment transport. a* Plagioclase and clay dissolution dictates elemental profiles at Shale Hills soils. a* Swales at Shale Hills are wetter but oxic, evidenced by the positive Ce.sup.a anomaly. Author Affiliation: (a) Earth and Environmental Systems Institute, Pennsylvania State University, 2217 Earth and Engineering Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA (b) Department of Geological Sciences, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968, USA
    Keywords: Geomorphology ; Soil Chemistry ; Shales ; Sediment Transport ; Hydrology
    ISSN: 0883-2927
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Applied Geochemistry, June, 2011, Vol.26, p.S108-S111
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeochem.2011.03.042 Byline: Xianzeng Niu (a), Kerstin A. Lehnert (b), Jennifer Williams (a), Susan L. Brantley (a) Abstract: Multiple Critical Zone Observatories (CZO) have been established in recent years in the USA and other international settings to conduct collaborative research on processes that occur at and near Earth's surface, also known as the Critical Zone (CZ). Data documentation and data sharing are two persistent problems facing the CZOs that impede the ability for cross-site comparisons and integrated analysis. In this study, a relational database was developed for CZ rock and regolith geochemical data - CZChemDB. There are a total of 24 interrelated tables in the database, each representing different aspects of CZ features. The main data group includes tables of locations, sites, samples, subsamples, preparation/treatments, laboratory-analysis and data values. The meta-data group includes tables of methods, references, and data quality. Lookup tables (variables, units, etc.) contain lists of "controlled" vocabularies. The CZChemDB is currently implemented in the MS Access database management system. It is expected to be integrated into the EarthChem portal by summer of 2011 for broader online accessibility and usability. This integration also complements the EarthChem's global geochemistry database with CZ regolith data. The structure of the CZChemDB is simple, straightforward, and flexible so that it has potential to accommodate other chemical data collected from CZOs, such as pore fluid data. Furthermore, the development of CZChemDB represents the first attempt toward the standardization of geochemical data documentation and data sharing among CZOs. This effort will establish a model to bridge the connections between data acquisition, data management, data sharing, and data searching/discovering that are all essential but weak in terms of linkages within most geoscience research projects. Author Affiliation: (a) Earth and Environmental Systems Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA (b) Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, 61 Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964, USA
    Keywords: Metadata -- Analysis ; Metadata -- Chemical Properties
    ISSN: 0883-2927
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Applied Geochemistry, 2011, Vol.26, pp.S51-S56
    Description: ► Soils in a swale are controlled by weathering and colluvium sediment transport. ► Plagioclase and clay dissolution dictates elemental profiles at Shale Hills soils. ► Swales at Shale Hills are wetter but oxic, evidenced by the positive Ce anomaly. Soil chemistry data (major and REEs) are presented from a swale transect for comparison to similar measurements on a planar transect published previously for the Susquehanna/Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory. Similar reaction fronts are observed: plagioclase dissolution is indicated by Na and Ca depletion and a negative Eu anomaly; clay dissolution followed by particle loss is accompanied by depletion of Mg, K, Fe, Al and Si. However, in contrast to the planar transect, soils along the swale transect, especially in the topographically depressed site, do not show smooth elemental profiles. This documents both residuum soils and accumulation of colluvium sediments. The soils in the swale transect are thicker and on average wetter than those along the planar transect; however, the Ce anomaly observed in the swale soils is consistent with a generally oxic environment. Thus, preferential flowpaths are an important mechanism for water transport, preventing swale soils from water saturation.
    Keywords: Geology
    ISSN: 0883-2927
    E-ISSN: 1872-9134
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Applied geochemistry, 2011, Vol.26S, pp.S51-S56
    Description: Soil chemistry data (major and REEs) are presented from a swale transect for comparison to similar measurements on a planar transect published previously for the Susquehanna/Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory. Similar reaction fronts are observed: plagioclase dissolution is indicated by Na and Ca depletion and a negative Eu anomaly; clay dissolution followed by particle loss is accompanied by depletion of Mg, K, Fe, Al and Si. However, in contrast to the planar transect, soils along the swale transect, especially in the topographically depressed site, do not show smooth elemental profiles. This documents both residuum soils and accumulation of colluvium sediments. The soils in the swale transect are thicker and on average wetter than those along the planar transect; however, the Ce anomaly observed in the swale soils is consistent with a generally oxic environment. Thus, preferential flowpaths are an important mechanism for water transport, preventing swale soils from water saturation. ; p. S51-S56.
    Keywords: Calcium ; Clay ; Hydrology ; Soil Chemistry ; Magnesium ; Plagioclase ; Colluvium ; Shale ; Sodium ; Silicon ; Weathering ; Iron ; Aluminum ; Potassium ; Geochemistry ; Soil
    ISSN: 0883-2927
    Source: AGRIS (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Applied Geochemistry, 2011, Vol.26, pp.S89-S93
    Description: ► Statistical analysis on element concentrations of bedrock, regolith, and sediments. ► Element groups with different geochemical behaviors during soil formation. ► Mineralogical, cycling, and geochemical controls during chemical weathering. Major and trace element concentrations were measured in bedrock, regolith and stream sediments from a first-order catchment developed entirely on grey shale in central Pennsylvania, USA. These elements can be classified into five major groups based on statistical data analysis. The presence of different elemental groups is due to the mineralogical origin, cycling processes, and geochemical properties of these elements during soil formation. A better understanding of the behaviors of these elements during chemical weathering would allow for their possible use as natural tracers in Critical Zone processes.
    Keywords: Geology
    ISSN: 0883-2927
    E-ISSN: 1872-9134
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Applied geochemistry, 2011, Vol.26S, pp.S89-S93
    Description: Major and trace element concentrations were measured in bedrock, regolith and stream sediments from a first-order catchment developed entirely on grey shale in central Pennsylvania, USA. These elements can be classified into five major groups based on statistical data analysis. The presence of different elemental groups is due to the mineralogical origin, cycling processes, and geochemical properties of these elements during soil formation. A better understanding of the behaviors of these elements during chemical weathering would allow for their possible use as natural tracers in Critical Zone processes. ; p. S89-S93.
    Keywords: Bedrock ; Tracer Techniques ; Shale ; Sediments ; Watersheds ; Soil Formation ; Streams ; Trace Elements ; Geochemistry ; Weathering ; Regolith
    ISSN: 0883-2927
    Source: AGRIS (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Applied geochemistry, 2011, Vol.26S, pp.S40-S43
    Description: Humans have transferred large quantities of metals from the lithosphere to the Earth’s surface, drastically altering the natural flow of these elements. The geographic dispersal of many metals and their impacts on the environment are unknown. Here, existing datasets are compiled to assess how anthropogenic inputs of Mn to the air have altered soil and water chemistry over time. Although levels of Mn in the air have declined in recent decades, soils throughout the USA and Europe are enriched in Mn, revealing past contamination near zones of industrial input. Examination of river chemistry indicates a similar decline in Mn and can be used to evaluate the removal of Mn from soils. We use a small watershed, the Susquehanna/Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory, as a focus site to investigate geochemical mass balance models and find that rapid biocycling contributes to the retention of Mn in this affected ecosystem. ; p. S40-S43.
    Keywords: Models ; Data Collection ; Soil Chemistry ; Environmental Impact ; Watersheds ; Ecosystems ; Air ; Humans ; Rivers ; Manganese ; Hydrochemistry ; Geochemistry
    ISSN: 0883-2927
    Source: AGRIS (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Applied Geochemistry, 2011, Vol.26, pp.S40-S43
    Description: ► Soils throughout the United States and Europe are enriched in Mn near zones of industrial input. ► The decline of Mn in rivers reflects the decline of Mn in air since the mid-20th century. ► River chemistry can be used to evaluate the removal of Mn from soils. ► Rapid biocycling contributes to the retention of Mn in affected ecosystems. Humans have transferred large quantities of metals from the lithosphere to the Earth’s surface, drastically altering the natural flow of these elements. The geographic dispersal of many metals and their impacts on the environment are unknown. Here, existing datasets are compiled to assess how anthropogenic inputs of Mn to the air have altered soil and water chemistry over time. Although levels of Mn in the air have declined in recent decades, soils throughout the USA and Europe are enriched in Mn, revealing past contamination near zones of industrial input. Examination of river chemistry indicates a similar decline in Mn and can be used to evaluate the removal of Mn from soils. We use a small watershed, the Susquehanna/Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory, as a focus site to investigate geochemical mass balance models and find that rapid biocycling contributes to the retention of Mn in this affected ecosystem.
    Keywords: Geology
    ISSN: 0883-2927
    E-ISSN: 1872-9134
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
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