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  • 1
    In: BMC Neuroscience, 2010, Vol.11(Suppl 1), p.P4-P4
    Description: A possible strategy of information coding employed by cortical networks involves the propagation of activity through synchronously firing groups of neurons, termed assemblies. A hallmark signature of such an assembly coding scheme is the detection of synchronous spiking in parallel recordings of neuronal activity. Experimental work (e.g., [1]) indirectly substantiates the assembly idea with findings of behavioral correlates of significant excess synchronous spiking activity. Recently, we demonstrated [2] that such excess coincident spikes, or Unitary Events [3], also show an exceptionally strong phase-locking to oscillations of the local field potential (LFP), a signal measured directly at the population level. A theoretical model consistently embeds this experimentally observed relationship within the assembly framework. In this context, the weak entrainment of spikes of a single neuron to the LFP is explained as a reflection of the neuron's participation in different assemblies across the network.
    Keywords: Poster Presentation
    E-ISSN: 1471-2202
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: BMC Neuroscience, 01 July 2011, Vol.12(Suppl 1), p.P131
    Description: The recent years have seen a rapid increase of interest in simultaneously analyzing the activity recorded from large numbers of channels in order to investigate the role of concerted neural activity in brain function. These efforts have led to advances in data analysis methods [1] that exploit the parallel properties of such data sets [2]. However, an often neglected aspect is that massively parallel data streams place new demands on handling their complexity during all stages of the project [3]: from the initial recording, throughout the analysis process, to the final publication. Three factors contribute these new demands: First, the sheer quantity of data complicates the organization of data sources, and the resulting automatization of analysis steps renders the validation of interim and final results difficult. Second, modern analysis methods often require intricate, multi-layered implementations, leading to sophisticated analysis toolchains [4]. Third, a growing number of projects needs to be carried out in teams, within a laboratory or in collaborative efforts, requiring transparent workflows that guarantee smooth interaction. Taken together, the increase in complexity calls for a reevaluation of the ad-hoc traditional approaches to such projects. Can we derive general guiding principles that may be adopted for designs of efficient workflows? How could these improve our confidence in handling the data by providing better cross-validation of findings, reliably managing provenance data, and enabling tighter collaborative research, while at the same time leaving the scientist with the flexibility required for creative research?
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 1471-2202
    E-ISSN: 1471-2202
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: BMC Neuroscience, 01 July 2011, Vol.12(Suppl 1), p.P132
    Description: Living organisms do not only passively receive sensory stimuli from the external world, but also actively explore their surroundings using their sensory organs such as sniffing for odor sensation, whisking for touch sensation, and eye-movements for visual sensation. While neuronal activities underlying active sensing in olfaction and vibrissa sensation have been studied in detail, the activities related to active vision have remained largely unknown. In a recent study, we studied spike synchrony between neurons recorded from the primary visual cortex (V1) of monkeys while they perform visual exploration of natural scene images with self-paced, voluntary eye-movements and found that the V1 cells show excess synchrony around the onset of their response to visual fixation [1]. In the subsequent study, we further examined LFP activities recorded simultaneously with the spike data and found the evidence that the oscillatory LFP activity in the beta frequency band (10-25 Hz) related to the initiation of saccadic eye-movements modulates the timing of single spikes and supports the occurrence of spike synchrony of the V1 cells [2].
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 1471-2202
    E-ISSN: 1471-2202
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: BMC Neuroscience, 01 July 2011, Vol.12(Suppl 1), p.P144
    Description: Ever since the discovery of precisely timed events of cortical neurons [1], their role for information processing has been highly debated. The widespread belief that synchrony is an epiphenomenon caused by shared afferents among neurons [2] has constantly been challenged by reports observing task related modulation of synchrony, lately in primary visual cortex [3] and motor cortex [4]. More so, the recently found decorrelation in cortical networks [5] suggests that the ground state of recurrent balanced networks provides a suitable substrate on top of which synchronized events can represent information.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 1471-2202
    E-ISSN: 1471-2202
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: BMC Neuroscience, 01 July 2011, Vol.12(Suppl 1), p.O8
    Description: The local field potential (LFP), usually referring to the low-frequency part of an extracellularly recorded potential (〈 500 Hz), is nowadays routinely measured together with the spiking activity. The LFP is commonly believed to mainly reflect synaptic activity in a local population surrounding the electrode [1] but how large this population is, i.e. how many neurons contribute to the signal, is still debated. In this modeling study we investigate which factors influence the spatial summation of contributions that generate the LFP signal. A better understanding of this is crucial for a correct interpretation of the LFP, especially when analyzing multiple LFP signals recorded simultaneously at different cortical sites.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 1471-2202
    E-ISSN: 1471-2202
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  • 6
    In: BMC Neuroscience, 2010, Vol.11(Suppl 1), p.O15-O15
    Description: In the correlation analysis of experimentally recorded parallel spike trains one has to thoroughly consider the statistical features of the data in order to prevent false positive results [1]. Typically, the complexity of the data prevents us from using analytical expressions for evaluating the significance of observed correlations. Similarly, parametric tests presuppose models that are typically simplifications of the real neuronal data and thus may ignore important features. An alternative to these approaches is to use surrogate data, i.e. modified versions of the original data, to assess the significance [2]. The goal of this study is to develop selection criteria for suitable surrogate types.
    Keywords: Oral Presentation
    E-ISSN: 1471-2202
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: BMC Neuroscience, 7/2012, Vol.13(S1)
    Description: Hebb (1949) suggested cell assemblies as the building blocks of information processing in the brain. The member neurons are assumed to show correlated activity. Advances in multi-electrode technology providing simultaneous recordings from 100 or more neurons increased chances to identify such ensembles considerably. We present a data mining method that detects assemblies in massively parallel spike data both reliably and efficiently.
    Keywords: Medicine;
    ISSN: BMC Neuroscience
    E-ISSN: 1471-2202
    Source: CrossRef
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: BMC Neuroscience, 01 July 2012, Vol.13(Suppl 1), p.P123
    Description: The neocortex of mammalian brains shows prominent oscillatory activity in the local field potential (LFP) and EEG signal within a broad range of frequencies from slow (1-8 Hz) delta/theta band to gamma band (40-100 Hz) and higher frequencies [1]. Oscillations in different frequency bands seem to be linked. There is increasing evidence that amplitude modulations in the gamma frequency band are phase-locked to the delta/theta rhythm [2]. Several studies have linked theta-gamma phase-amplitude coupling to cognitive processes [3]. Here we report that in awake mice gamma band LFP power in the barrel cortex is phase-locked to the concurrent theta band LFP oscillation and that this theta band oscillation is strongly correlated to the respiratory rhythm. When the animals were briefly exposed to hypoxic air, the resulting frequency increases in the respiratory rhythm were paralleled in the delta/theta band LFP oscillations (Fig.1A-D). LFP oscillations in sub-bands of the broad (40 – 100 Hz) gamma frequency band were amplitude-modulated in phase with the breathing frequency (Fig. ​(Fig.1E).1E). After removal of the olfactory bulb the frequency profile of the phase-amplitude coupling was significantly changed. Particularly the respiration-locked amplitude modulation in the high gamma band (64-128 Hz), which was prominent in healthy control mice, shifted to lower frequencies in bulbectomized mice. Our findings imply that in mice respiratory activity directly modulates delta/theta band LFP oscillations through respiration-locked olfactory bulb activity and indirectly, through phase-amplitude coupling, gamma band power.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 1471-2202
    E-ISSN: 1471-2202
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: BMC Neuroscience, 01 July 2012, Vol.13(Suppl 1), p.P127
    Description: Oscillations of the local field potential (LFP) are regarded as a signature of synchronized activity in neuronal networks. In primary motor (MI) and premotor (PM) cortex, LFPs typically exhibit such oscillatory activity in the beta range (15–30Hz) during an instructed delay [1]. These oscillations tend to display a wave-like propagation across the cortical surface [2]. In parallel, temporally precise, behavior-related spike synchronization is often observed during periods of movement preparation and expectation [3]. In a previous study we demonstrated that the occurrence of significant spike coincidences is dependent on the phase of LFP beta oscillations [4]. In order to extend these studies to include positional information, we here study how the spatio-temporal organization of the LFP activity across cortical distances of several millimeters is related to that of spike synchronization [5].
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 1471-2202
    E-ISSN: 1471-2202
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: BMC Neuroscience, 01 July 2009, Vol.10(Suppl 1), p.P253
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 1471-2202
    E-ISSN: 1471-2202
    Source: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)
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